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Collection
Printed materials including reports, event programs, newsletters, and brochures published by the Beloved Community Center between 2002-2013. Topics include local governance, the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the Greensboro Police Department. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Beloved Community Center is a community-based, grassroots organization dedicated to social activism, advocacy, and uplift in the Greensboro, NC area. The collection comprises printed materials, including reports, event programs, newsletters, and brochures published by the Beloved Community Center between 2002-2013. Topics include local governance, the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the Greensboro Police Department. Reports include: "A Decade of Building a Spirit of Beloved Community" and "Our Democratic Mission: Transitioning the Greensboro Police Department from Double Standards and Corruption to Accountability and Professionalism." Newsletters and brochures included are: "Towards a New Democratic Conversation: Connecting Mass Movements to Building Local People Power and Governance," "Celebrating 20 Years: A New Era for Greensboro and the Nation," "The Democracy Road: Toward a More Racially Just City, A Sustainable Economy, Good Jobs for All, and Relevant, Equitable Education." Also included is the event program for the "Swearing in and Seating of the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission." Reports include: "A Decade of Building a Spirit of Beloved Community" and "Our Democratic Mission: Transitioning the Greensboro Police Department from Double Standards and Corruption to Accountability and Professionalism." Newsletters and brochures included are: "Towards a New Democratic Conversation: Connecting Mass Movements to Building Local People Power and Governance," "Celebrating 20 Years: A New Era for Greensboro and the Nation," "The Democracy Road: Toward a More racially Just City, A Sustainable Economy, Good Jobs for All, and Relevant, Equitable Education." Also included is the event program for the "Swearing in and Seating of the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission."

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection

Falkener Family papers, 1893-2001 9 Linear Feet — 7000 Items

African-American family based in Greensboro (Guildford Co.), North Carolina. Waldo C. Falkener served on the Greensboro City Council from 1959-1963. His wife, Margaret, was also politically active. The collection primarily documents the political career of Waldo C. Falkener, and comprises minutes and reports from Greensboro City Council meetings. There are also materials from his campaigns for office and items that document his successes as a council member. In addition, there are documents relating to other family members, including photographs, news articles, correspondence, and deeds. Later accessions include clippings, correspondence, and other materials documenting the political careers of the Falkeners. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection primarily documents the political career of Waldo C. Falkener and comprises minutes and reports from Greensboro City Council meetings. The council minutes include committee reports (finance, public works, transportation, and real estate committees), as well as ordinances, laws, memoranda, and letters. Meeting notes are arranged by date, spanning 1959-1966. There are also materials from his campaigns for office and items that document his successes as a council member. Some correspondence relates to the life of Falkener's father, Henry Hall Falkener, also an active politician and public school teacher. Documents span beyond Falkener's death in 1992 up until 2001, including obituaries and memorial material. In addition, there are documents relating to other family members, George H. Falkener, Henry Hall Falkener, Madge Z. Mitchell Falkener, and Margaret E. Falkener. Materials include photographs, news articles, correspondence, and deeds. Printed materials consist largely of those published by the Greensboro City Council, including annual budget reports, personel reviews, and handbooks. The collection includes newspaper articles about Falkener's civic services and letters of appreciation (1972, 1979), as well as materials related to the successful campaign to name a Greensboro elementary school after Falkener and his father (2001).

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection

International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) records, 1918-2020, bulk 1970-2020 221 Linear Feet — 155 boxes; 3 oversize folders — 2700 Gigabytes

Online
The International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) is a non-profit organization that assists countries in pursuing accountability for mass atrocities and human rights abuses. Its records span the years 1918 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1970s-2020. Materials include ICTJ office and administrative files, program and conference records, annual reports, legal journals, human rights organization publications, reports and white papers, newspapers, subject files, teaching materials, trial transcripts, and posters and ephemera. There are many audiovisual and digital records. Groups and governing bodies represented in the materials include ICTJ, Amnesty International, United Nations organizations and missions, the European Union, the Washington Office on Latin America, the World Bank, Minority Rights Group International, criminal courts, truth commissions, and many others. Administrative files include the papers of former ICTJ Presidents and other staff files, including Juan E. Mendez, Priscilla Hayner, Louis Bickford, Alex Boraine, Ian Martin, Lisa Magarrell, and Marieke Wierda -- as well as institutional memory files that document the narrative of the creation and work of ICTJ. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The records of the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) span the years 1918 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials from the late 20th and early 21st century. The materials document the activities of ICTJ in its support of peace processes and to the pursuit of legal reparations and reconciliation in areas of conflict involving human rights violations. Formats in the collection include ICTF office and administrative files, annual reports, single articles, legal journals, human rights organization publications, reports and white papers, conference proceedings, newspapers and clippings, trial transcripts, teaching materials, and photographs, as well as some posters and other ephemera such as fliers, graphics, invitations, and programs. There are many audiovisual and digital formats.

There are four main series: Geographic Files, Reference and Reports, Program and Subject Files, and Administrative Files. The Geographic series contains materials from countries directly impacted by the work of ICTJ and its partners. It is arranged by continent and then by country. These materials cover virtually every major case of human rights abuse and violation worldwide. There are also materials on affiliated armed conflicts such as the Iraq War and the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina; violent ethnic clashes; refugee movements; refugee and detention camps; women's rights; and case studies of human rights abuses.

The Reference and Reports series formed ICTJ's documentation library. The Program and Subject files contain thematically-arranged publications about ICTJ's main subject areas, such as transitional justice and reparations, as well as the programatic materials from ICTJ conferences, workshops, publications, truth commissions, and program divisions. The final series, administrative files, is largely comprised of the files of former ICTJ presidents Alex Boraine and Juan Mendez and other staff files, including Louis Bickford, director of multiple ICTJ units. The staff files and the institutional memory files come together to form the narrative of the creation and work of ICTJ since its beginnings in 2001.

Each series also lists audiovisual materials and digital files. These materials are inserted into the series they correspond with. Formats include Betamax tapes, mini-DVs, DVDs, CDs, VHS tapes, and cassette tapes. The audiovisual materials include trial recordings, staff interviews, conference recordings, and truth commission proceedings; some of these were digitized by ICTJ staff. The born-digital records contain similar materials and also include training materials, ICTJ administrative materials, and program specific documents.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.