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Printed materials including reports, event programs, newsletters, and brochures published by the Beloved Community Center between 2002-2013. Topics include local governance, the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the Greensboro Police Department. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Beloved Community Center is a community-based, grassroots organization dedicated to social activism, advocacy, and uplift in the Greensboro, NC area. The collection comprises printed materials, including reports, event programs, newsletters, and brochures published by the Beloved Community Center between 2002-2013. Topics include local governance, the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the Greensboro Police Department. Reports include: "A Decade of Building a Spirit of Beloved Community" and "Our Democratic Mission: Transitioning the Greensboro Police Department from Double Standards and Corruption to Accountability and Professionalism." Newsletters and brochures included are: "Towards a New Democratic Conversation: Connecting Mass Movements to Building Local People Power and Governance," "Celebrating 20 Years: A New Era for Greensboro and the Nation," "The Democracy Road: Toward a More Racially Just City, A Sustainable Economy, Good Jobs for All, and Relevant, Equitable Education." Also included is the event program for the "Swearing in and Seating of the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission." Reports include: "A Decade of Building a Spirit of Beloved Community" and "Our Democratic Mission: Transitioning the Greensboro Police Department from Double Standards and Corruption to Accountability and Professionalism." Newsletters and brochures included are: "Towards a New Democratic Conversation: Connecting Mass Movements to Building Local People Power and Governance," "Celebrating 20 Years: A New Era for Greensboro and the Nation," "The Democracy Road: Toward a More racially Just City, A Sustainable Economy, Good Jobs for All, and Relevant, Equitable Education." Also included is the event program for the "Swearing in and Seating of the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission."

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Falkener Family papers, 1893-2001 9 Linear Feet — 7000 Items

African-American family based in Greensboro (Guildford Co.), North Carolina. Waldo C. Falkener served on the Greensboro City Council from 1959-1963. His wife, Margaret, was also politically active. The collection primarily documents the political career of Waldo C. Falkener, and comprises minutes and reports from Greensboro City Council meetings. There are also materials from his campaigns for office and items that document his successes as a council member. In addition, there are documents relating to other family members, including photographs, news articles, correspondence, and deeds. Later accessions include clippings, correspondence, and other materials documenting the political careers of the Falkeners. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection primarily documents the political career of Waldo C. Falkener and comprises minutes and reports from Greensboro City Council meetings. The council minutes include committee reports (finance, public works, transportation, and real estate committees), as well as ordinances, laws, memoranda, and letters. Meeting notes are arranged by date, spanning 1959-1966. There are also materials from his campaigns for office and items that document his successes as a council member. Some correspondence relates to the life of Falkener's father, Henry Hall Falkener, also an active politician and public school teacher. Documents span beyond Falkener's death in 1992 up until 2001, including obituaries and memorial material. In addition, there are documents relating to other family members, George H. Falkener, Henry Hall Falkener, Madge Z. Mitchell Falkener, and Margaret E. Falkener. Materials include photographs, news articles, correspondence, and deeds. Printed materials consist largely of those published by the Greensboro City Council, including annual budget reports, personel reviews, and handbooks. The collection includes newspaper articles about Falkener's civic services and letters of appreciation (1972, 1979), as well as materials related to the successful campaign to name a Greensboro elementary school after Falkener and his father (2001).

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.