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Alice J. Cutright Kaine papers, 1864-1947 0.8 Linear Feet — 305 Items

The papers of Alice J. Cutright Kaine document her work primarily as an administrative advisor at the Tuskegee Institute but also include information on her employment as a public school teacher in Springfield, Ill., her service on the board of the Wisconsin Industrial School for Girls and the State Board of Control (for prisons), and her travels to Dixfield, Maine, and Nelson County, Va. The collection contains correspondence, writings, legal papers, printed materials, photographs, and ephemera.

The strength of the collection lies with its documentation of Tuskegee Institute. Kaine was hired in 1894 as the head of the Household Department to supervise everything "from the making of bricks to the baking of white bread." (newsclipping, 1947) At the time, Kaine was the only white person on the Institute's staff.

Letters to her brother, Austin Cutright, describe her work her at Tuskegee Institute as well as the Tuskegee community in general. In these letters she speaks frankly about Booker T. Washington's educational philosophy and management style and her close relationship with Washington's wife Margaret and their children. Kaine visited several black families and churches in Tuskegee with the Washingtons and her letters and writings describe the living conditions and religious services she observed as well as the difficulties she had as a white woman in an all black community.

Approximately half of the correspondence from 1896-1903 consists of letters written to Kaine from Tuskegee administrators and Margaret Washington after Kaine's departure from Tuskegee. Letters from J.H. Washington, Superintendent of Industries, contain information on the maintenance of housekeeping practices established by Kaine. Letters from Margaret Washington are of a more personal nature and contain anecdotes and news from Tuskegee. Several of the writings and speeches concern Kaine's work at Tuskegee and describe her experiences from a sympathetic yet somewhat patronizing point of view. A file of printed materials relates exclusively to Tuskegee Institute, and a portrait of the Washington family (ca. 1895) is filed in the photographs series.

Outside of the materials relating to Tuskegee Institute, the papers provide only fragmented documentation of Kaine's life. A few letters to Kaine in the 1860s and 1870s describe her appointment to various teaching positions. Legal papers, writings and addresses, and newsclippings reflect her work with the Wisconsin Industrial School for Girls, the State Board of Control, and various social and civic organizations.

Earlier letters, chiefly written to her husband, depict Kaine's visits in the 1880s to New England, particularly Dixfield, Maine, and to her ancestral home in Nelson County, Va. Letters from Dixfield describe the local community life in detail. The series of photographs contains several views of Lovingston, Va., including churches, the courthouse, a hotel, Negro houses and other homes. Letters to Kaine from her brother during the 1940s detail his life in Milwaukee during World War II and to some extent Kaine's life at the Grand Army Home until her death.

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Elizabeth Johnson Harris memoir, 1923 .1 Linear Feet — 22 x 35 cm. — Includes preservation photocopy and use photocopy

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85-page handwritten memoir supplemented with photographs and clippings documenting the personal and family history of poet and writer Elizabeth Johnson Harris of Augusta, GA, daughter of formerly enslaved parents. It includes her reflections on race relations, the place of African-Americans in society, as well as the importance of religion, education, and music in her life.

85-page handwritten manuscript in a bound notebook. It starts on the front side of the pages until the end of the notebook, where it continues from back to front on the backs of the pages. It covers her life in chronological order with the exception of some earlier stories recounted in later sections.

Harris divided the memoir into two sections: her childhood years and her life during and after her courtship and marriage. The manuscript also includes tipped in photographs and newsclippings. The photograph on the inside front cover above the dedication is an image of Johnson's adult daughter, Mattie Louise. The appendix contains the majority of the clippings, which consist of her poetry, several folk tales, and news stories about the Harris family.

The memoir describes Harris' childhood in Augusta, GA, race relations, her ambivalence about her place in society as an African-American, and the importance of religion and education in her life. She includes the story of her courtship and marriage, as well as descriptions of the adult lives of several of her children. Her son Charles Jacob Harris (1885-1988), was a classically trained pianist, composer, and teacher whose papers are also held by the Rubenstein Library.

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Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas was the wife of Jefferson Thomas, Confederate officer and Georgia planter. This collection contains diaries, partially unbound, for the years 1848-1849, 1851-1852, 1855-1859, 1861-1866, 1868-1871, and 1878-1889, with the first volume in a different hand from the rest. Typed copies of the diaries are also included. The entries describe in detail Mrs. Thomas' reading; studies at Macon Female College (now called Wesleyan College) in Macon, Ga.; conversion to methodism; clothing and dress styles; gossip and social life; shopping and prices; church services; courtship by and marriage to Jefferson Thomas; and plantation life in Burke and Columbia counties.

This collection contains diaries, partially unbound, for the years 1848-1849, 1851-1852, 1855-1859, 1861-1866, 1868-1871, and 1878-1889, with the first volume in a different hand from the rest. Typed version of the diaries are also included. The entries describe in detail Mrs. Thomas' reading; studies at Macon Female College (now called Wesleyan College) in Macon, Ga.; conversion to methodism; clothing and dress styles; gossip and social life; shopping and prices; church services; courtship by and marriage to Jefferson Thomas; and plantation life in Burke and Columbia counties.

Other subjects discussed include black religion; the institution of slavery and the relations between white men and slave women; Civil War military activities, especially concerning Jefferson Thomas' career; destruction of property by Union troops; social conditions after the war; spiritualism; labor and servant problems, financial losses and poverty; school teaching; and the earthquake of 1886.

Other items include letters (two from Jefferson Thomas); photograph of a portrait of Mrs. Thomas; and a life membership certificate from the National Woman Suffrage Association of the United States (later the National American Woman Suffrage Association).

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John K. Smith papers, 1867-1924 0.5 Linear Feet — 70 Items

African American farmer and family of Meadowview (Washington County), Virginia. Correspondence, legal, and financial papers of several generations of a rural black family in Washington County, Va., concerning personal and family matters, men working away from home, county taxes, black societies, religious activities, insurance and other topics.

Correspondence and legal and financial papers from the late 19th and early 20th centuries of several generations of a rural black family in Washington County, Virginia. Topics concern personal and family matters, men working away from home, county taxes, black societies, religious activities, insurance and other topics. The financial papers in the collection document insurance investments, rental contracts, and the extent of the Smith family's land holdings in Washington County. Smith held an insurance policy with the Southern Aid Society of Virginia, and a death benefit with the Sons of Zion Benevolent Society. Letters in the collection touch on emigration, long-distance courtship, and itinerant labor.

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John Wilson Fleming papers, 1948-2005 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes

Collection comprises sermons, teaching materials, writings, and other professional papers of John Wilson Fleming, Baptist pastor and professor of history, philosophy, and religion at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina. Handwritten drafts of sermons date from the 1950s to the 2000s, and make up almost half of the collection. Other papers include: drafts of speeches, articles, and an unpublished full-length novel, Girded with strength; church programs; lecture notes, syllabi, and a few student papers; Shaw University administrative papers; papers pertaining to politics and school districts in Raleigh, North Carolina, 1964; and some biographical materials, including a resumé and obituary. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises sermons, teaching materials, writings, and other professional papers of John Wilson Fleming, Baptist pastor, university administrator, and professor of history, philosophy, and religion at Shaw University. Handwritten drafts of sermons date from the 1950s to the 2000s, and make up almost half of the collection. Other papers include drafts of speeches, articles, and an unpublished full-length novel, Girded with strength; church programs; lecture notes, syllabi, and a few student papers; Shaw University administrative papers; papers pertaining to politics and school districts in Raleigh, North Carolina, 1964; and some biographical materials including a resumé and obituary.

The sermons and other writings by John W. Fleming, make up the bulk of the collection. There are only small amounts of correspondence. Topics of significance in the papers include: African American perspectives on religion and Christianity; study and teaching of religion, theology, history, and philosophy; African American educators and university administrators; and religious aspects of African American history, race relations, and the civil rights movement.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Kristin Bedford photographs, 1930s-2018 10 Linear Feet — 15 boxes — 172 photographic prints; approximately 75 related items

Kristin Bedford is a photographer based in Los Angeles. The 172 color photographs taken by Bedford from 2012 to 2018, derive from three projects: "Be Still: A Storefront Church in Durham," which consists of images of African American worshippers and their pastor in Durham, North Carolina; "The Perfect Picture," images from the multi-racial Peace Mission Movement religious community, founded by Father and Mother Divine in the 1930s, and the community's estate, Woodmont, near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Bedford's latest work, "Cruise Night," a photographic essay on the lowrider community in Los Angeles, California. The "Perfect Picture" prints are accompanied by a variety of related materials (1930s-1990s), including movement publications and print ephemera, historical photographs, a CD of sermons, memorabilia, and other items; materials in this project speak to race relations in the 20th century, the civil rights movement, and African American religious culture. All three projects include a set of large color inkjet exhibit prints as well as a duplicate set of smaller handling prints, and an essay written by the photographer for each project. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographic work in the Kristin Bedford collection derives from three projects undertaken by Bedford from 2012 to 2018. The images explore three very different communities in the United States: two religious communities and their expressions of beliefs and faith, one in North Carolina and one in Pennsylvania, and the culture and identity of Mexican American lowriders in Los Angeles.

The project titled "Be Still: A Storefront Church in Durham" offers portraits of an African American community of worshippers of the Apostolic Deliverance Rebirth Outreach Ministries, in Durham, North Carolina. Images show the congregation as well as their church building.

"The Perfect Picture" project documents the daily lives of the remaining members of the International Peace Mission Movement, a multi-racial religious community founded by Father Divine in New York State in the 1930s, and was photographed at the community's estate, "Woodmont," near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The project title, "Perfect Picture," refers to Father Divine's use of photography as an analogy for creating a perfect life of faith and unity. The color inkjet photographs are accompanied by a variety of related materials (1930s-1990s): publications, photographs, some correspondence, a CD of sermons, memorabilia, and other items. The "Perfect Picture" project offers insights into race relations in the United States; African American religion; religious life in New York State and Pennsylvania; the 20th century civil rights movement; and the utopian philosophies of U.S. religious communities in the 20th century.

The "Cruise Nights" project, undertaken by Bedford in 2014, gives insights into the lowrider community of Los Angeles. The photographs are intense color close-ups of customized car exteriors and interiors, their drivers and passengers, and the lowriders cruising down expansive Los Angeles boulevards; the images emphasize not only the lowriders and their cars, but also the interplay of self-expression, gender, and photography.

All three projects include a set of large color inkjet exhibit prints as well as a duplicate set of smaller 11x17 or 13x19 inch handling prints for research use. A short essay for each project written by the photographer is included in each box of handling prints.