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Akea Brionne Brown photographs, 2016-2018 2.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 33 prints

These thirty-three color inkjet portraits are from the body of work "Black Picket Fences" by Akea Brionne Brown, and explore the life of middle-class African Americans in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. Taken in part to confront stereotypes of African American neighborhoods and majority black American cities as dangerous and violent, the images chiefly portray family groups and individuals in interiors of homes and in outside environments such as front yards. The majority of the prints measure 19 3/8 x 24 inches. This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Documentarians of Color. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

These thirty-three color inkjet photographs are from the body of work "Black Picket Fences" by Akea Brionne Brown and explore the lives of middle-class African Americans in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. Taken in part to confront stereotypes of African American neighborhoods and majority black American cities as dangerous and violent, the images chiefly portray family groups and individuals in interiors of homes and in outside environments such as front yards and streets. The majority of the prints measure 19 3/8 x 24 inches. Two are sized slightly smaller at 15 3/4 x 20 3/4 and 15 x 20 1/4 inches.

The prints are accompanied by the artist's statement, in which she writes: "The project manifested through my own personal critique and observation of the suburban landscape as an ideologically 'white space.' I began to consider the importance of representation and exposure in relation to the formation of black identity, the performativity of blackness, and the ways in which the home transforms into a place of familiarity and/or unfamiliarity depending on who enters the space. In turn, this body of work aims to highlight an often overlooked group in contemporary American culture: the black, suburban middle class."

This work received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of Color. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The Behind the Veil Oral History Project was undertaken by Duke University's Lyndhurst Center for Documentary Studies in 1990. It seeks to record and preserve the living memory of African-American life during the age of legal segregation in the American South, from the 1890s to the 1950.

The Behind the Veil: Documenting African-American Life in the Jim Crow South Records span the years 1940-1997 (bulk 1993-1997) and are comprised chiefly of interviews recorded on cassette tapes. The 1260 interviews, 1993-1997, in this collection cover a number of topics related to African-American life in the 20th century with a focus on the age of southern segregation. The collection includes interviews with people from Albany, Ga.; Fargo, Ark.; Birmingham and Tuskegee, Ala.; Charlotte, Durham, Enfield, New Bern and Wilmington, N. C.; LeFlore County, Miss.; Memphis, Tenn.; Muhlenburg County, Ky.; New Iberia and New Orleans, La.; Norfolk, Va.; Columbia, Orangeburg, St. Helena, and Summerton, S. C.; and Tallahassee, Fla. In addition to interviews conducted specifically for the Behind the Veil project, the collection includes six interviews from the James City Historical Society, Craven County, N.C. as well as eight interviews conducted by Paul Ortiz in Tallahassee, Fla., in the summer of 1997 as part of his dissertation research.

The collection includes duplicate sets of approximately 1700 interview tapes. The Master Tapes Series is closed except for appropriate use by authorized staff from the Behind the Veil project and the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The Use Tapes Series contains copies of the tapes for use by researchers. The Printed Materials Series provides biographical information about informants, interview agreement forms, proper names sheets, and brief summaries (one-three pages) of each of the 1260 interviews. Also included are some personal papers, the earliest of which is dated 1940. The Transcripts Series currently includes unverified transcripts of 314 interviews in the collection. These transcripts are also available as electronic documents. A disk directory log exists. Contact Research Services staff for more information. More transcripts will be available each semester.

The Behind the Veil collection will eventually include approximately 5100 photographs and slides. This Visual Materials Series will contain items donated by informants and others in the communities where Behind the Veil field-workers conducted interviews. The vast majority of these pictures show family and community members at home or at special events. A smaller number portray buildings and other local places. Images of political events are notably rare in the collection. We also anticipate the eventual addition of the Behind the Veil project's papers, which will be held as the Administrative Files Series.

Behind the Veil interviewers were provided with a list of Interview Questions before they entered the field. Although most interviews in the collection do not follow the list question by question, the list provides a useful research guide to the type of inquiry many interviews follow. The list of questions is included as an appendix in this guide. Frequently discussed topics include family history, local neighborhoods, educational background, employment history, religious institutions, experiences of segregation, local political activities, civic organizations and activities, black-owned businesses and local culture. Behind the Veil informants represent a number of occupational groups, including domestic workers, educators, homemakers, health professionals, manufacturing workers, miners, ministers, political figures, professionals and servicemen.

Database:

A Behind the Veil Database, created by Alex X. Byrd, will soon accompany the collection. The fields included are in two categories: Informant and Circumstance of Interview. The Informant fields are Last Name, First Name, Middle or Maiden Name, Sex, Zip Code, Date of Birth, Place of Birth, and Principal Occupations. The Circumstance of Interview fields are Date of Interview, Location of Interview, Processing Subseries, and Interviewers. The other fields are: was the informant part of a group interview?; has the interview been transcribed?; if part of a group interview, under whose name is the material filed?; number of tapes for interview.

Consult reference staff concerning the availability of the database.

The addition (acc# 2001-0183)(100 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) includes a course syllabus, interviews of African-American North Carolinians on cassette tapes, some student self-evaluations, contracts, indices, and transcript excerpts. The area most represented is Durham, N.C. Students were to aim for insight into how African-Americans built communities during an age of racial oppression. The interviews include much information about family history and social and community issues.

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Elizabeth Johnson Harris memoir, 1923 .1 Linear Feet — 22 x 35 cm. — Includes preservation photocopy and use photocopy

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85-page handwritten memoir supplemented with photographs and clippings documenting the personal and family history of poet and writer Elizabeth Johnson Harris of Augusta, GA, daughter of formerly enslaved parents. It includes her reflections on race relations, the place of African-Americans in society, as well as the importance of religion, education, and music in her life.

85-page handwritten manuscript in a bound notebook. It starts on the front side of the pages until the end of the notebook, where it continues from back to front on the backs of the pages. It covers her life in chronological order with the exception of some earlier stories recounted in later sections.

Harris divided the memoir into two sections: her childhood years and her life during and after her courtship and marriage. The manuscript also includes tipped in photographs and newsclippings. The photograph on the inside front cover above the dedication is an image of Johnson's adult daughter, Mattie Louise. The appendix contains the majority of the clippings, which consist of her poetry, several folk tales, and news stories about the Harris family.

The memoir describes Harris' childhood in Augusta, GA, race relations, her ambivalence about her place in society as an African-American, and the importance of religion and education in her life. She includes the story of her courtship and marriage, as well as descriptions of the adult lives of several of her children. Her son Charles Jacob Harris (1885-1988), was a classically trained pianist, composer, and teacher whose papers are also held by the Rubenstein Library.

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William J. Anderson photographs and papers, 1920s, 1947-2011, bulk 1960-2008 7.0 Linear Feet — 9 boxes — Approximately 1000 items — 7.0 linear feet; approximately 1000 items

Collection features the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson, from his earliest years as an art student in the 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color. Anderson's images primarily document the Deep South, especially Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on portraits of African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and Civil Rights movement events. Two significant bodies of work were taken at Daufuskie Island and a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina; other images were taken in Mexico, Central America, and France. Also includes Anderson's professional papers, fliers, and posters, chiefly relating to exhibits, and a sketchbook. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson, from his earliest years as an art student in the early 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color.

Anderson's images primarily document African American culture and society in the Deep South, particularly in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and political rallies, riots, and Civil Rights marches and commemorations. Two significant bodies of work were taken on Daufuskie Island and in a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina. Other images, many of which are available only in negative format, were taken in San Francisco, Louisiana, Mexico, Central America, and France. Most of the images from Mexico and Central America date from the 1960s and are among his earliest work. There are also many images, spanning his career, of his sculptures and other artwork, and photographs of his exhibition openings. Additionally, there are some family photographs and negatives, a few of which appear to date from the 1920s and 1950s.

The large prints range in size from approximately 10x14 to 16x20 inches, and are all labeled with a title and date and print number, assigned by the photographer; they are arranged in original print number order. The other photographic work is mostly unlabeled and arranged in original order as received.

The collection also includes Anderson's professional correspondence, printed materials such as clippings, posters, and fliers, and other papers, all chiefly relating to exhibits and loans, and a sketchbook on the human form from his earliest student days, about 1957. Among the correspondence is a copy of a letter written by Coretta Scott King, thanking him for his participation in a commemorative event.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.