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Resident of Richmond, Va., socialist and grassroots political activist in his early life; founder of the Southern Electoral Reform League; later sided with conservatives such as Barry Goldwater and George Wallace. The David Gordon George Papers span the years 1919 to 1976, with the bulk of the collection dated between 1935 and 1965, and are organized into the Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials and Writings, Photographic Materials, and Subject Files Series. The collection consists primarily of correspondence and files related to George's involvement in a variety of political and social movements, documenting his early involvement in grassroots socialist and leftist democratic organizing and electoral reform work, decades of involvement with national and regional labor organizations, and his late-life support of anti-communist and socially conservative politics, including segregationist platforms. His complex views on the political and social status of African Americans in the South, particularly in Virginia, are documented in his writings and correspondence. Among the organizations well-represented in the collection are the Southern Electoral Reform League, the Virginia Electoral Reform League, and the United States Information Service. The papers include correspondence with a wide spectrum of national political leaders, from Socialists (Norman Thomas and Victor Berger) to Democrats (Hubert Humphrey and Estes Kefauer) to Conservatives (George Wallace), as well as staff of diverse labor organizations and a number of Virginia politicians across a broad ideological spectrum. Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

The David Gordon George Papers span the years 1919 to 1976, with the bulk of the collection dated between 1935 and 1965, and are organized into the Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials and Writings, Photographic Materials, and Subject Files Series. The collection consists primarily of correspondence and files related to George's involvement in a variety of political and social movements, documenting his early involvement in grassroots socialist and leftist democratic organizing and electoral reform work, decades of involvement with national and regional labor organizations, and his late-life support of anti-communist and socially conservative politics. His complex views on the political and social status of African Americans in the South, particularly in Virginia, are documented in his writings and correspondence. Among the organizations well-represented in the collection are the Southern Electoral Reform League, founded by George primarily to campaign against poll taxes, and the United States Information Service. The papers include files of correspondence with a wide spectrum of prominent national political leaders, from Socialists (Norman Thomas and Victor Berger) to Democrats (Hubert Humphrey and Estes Kefauer) to Conservatives (George Wallace), as well as staff of diverse labor organizations and a number of Virginia politicians across a broad ideological spectrum. There are also several files of correspondence relating to George's business ventures in Mexico, particularly his interests and operations in mining in the Chihuahua region.

George's writings, including many editorials and letters to the editor, and correspondence reveal his complex and shifting allegiances to various reform organizations during particularly eventful decades for the labor movement in the U.S. His work for labor-related causes in different guises put him in at least tacit opposition to positions he had advocated earlier. He also offers often contradictory views on race, supporting local black politicians at one point but joining the segregationist Citizens Council later in his life. In addition, George's experiences during the McCarthy Era demonstrate the lasting professional consequences of the alleged Communist ties in his past.

Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

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Correspondence, legal and financial papers, printed materials, and photographs document the personal relationships and professional activities of Rosser, a successful single African American businesswoman. Correspondence, 1920s-1940s, pertains to Rosser's business ventures in regard to the management of her rental property in Lynchburg, Virginia, and Durham, North Carolina; personal loans made to family and friends during the Depression; and her investments in government stocks and bonds. Later correspondence centers around her relationships with her foster daughter, Mattie Burton Meyers, and Rosser's niece, June. A folder of printed materials includes news clippings on both family events and local politics, church programs, and obituaries, and a 2012 publication about Fannie Rosser's foster daughter, Mattie Burton Meyers, active in the NAACP in Fresno, California. Family photographs date back to about the 1860s and include an early ambrotype, cabinet cards, and snapshots of Rosser and her friends in the 1920s and her daughter's family in Fresno, Calif., in the 1960s.

The papers of Fannie B. Rosser document the personal and professional life of a black businesswoman within a fiscally sound African American community in Durham, N.C. Correspondence, legal and financial papers, printed materials, and photographs reflect both her business activities and her relationships with close friends and family members from the turn of the century to the 1970s.

The bulk of the correspondence until the 1950s pertains to Rosser's business ventures, including maintenance of her property, personal loans made to family and friends, and her investments in government stocks and bonds. Letters from her lifelong friend and business partner, Virginia Randolf of Lynchburg, Va., document the process of maintaining Rosser's rental property over the course of thirty years. They highlight, among other things, the apparent ghettoization of the neighborhood in which her houses were situated, and Randolf's personal and financial response to that process.

Friends and family members often deferred financial matters to Rosser, a careful and respected business woman, and were often dependent on her for monetary support. The correspondence illustrates Rosser's financial acumen and demonstrates the extent to which her personal relationships and business activities overlapped. Of particular interest is an exchange with the Wilhoite's, a couple to whom she loaned $1000, during the Depression. Their correspondence illustrates the personal nature of her business dealings and the difficulties Rosser had in balancing finances and friendships.

Later correspondence centers around Rosser's relationships with her foster daughter Mattie Burton Meyers and niece June. There are scattered references to the political climate of the 1960s, and correspondence from Mattie mentions her work with the NAACP. Also, in the printed materials there is a 2012 published biography of Mattie written by her granddaughter Sharon Revis-Green.

The printed materials consist of materials such as news clippings on both family events and local politics, church programs, and obituaries. A large series of financial and legal papers, 1895-1969, provide extensive detail on Rosser's investments, insurance policies, and legal activities. Many of these documents are associated with firms such as the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, where Rosser was employed.

The photographs in the collection date back to the early 1860s and are mostly individual portraits and group photographs of African American family members and friends. An unidentified ambrotype of an African American woman dated prior to the Civil War indicates that the family might have been free.

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Glenn Scarboro photographs, 1962-1976 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 168 items — 168 items

This collection of 166 black-and-white inkjet 13x19 inch photographs by Glenn Scarboro explores through street photography, landscapes, and portraits the social life and culture of southern Virginia in the 1960s and 1970s. About half of the photographs were taken in Danville, the photographer's hometown, while other images were taken in Richmond, Blacksburg, Roanoke, and other towns of the region. A dozen or so photographs were taken in other states such as Georgia and North Carolina, and there are a few from Rhode Island and New York. The street scenes in Danville and other towns include images of white and African American residents, small businesses, houses, and churches; rural themes include horse shows. county fairs, and country landscapes. There is also a series of family portraits taken in the 1960s. Collection includes one handmade photobook by Scarboro containing eleven photographs and handwritten text. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

This collection of 166 13x19 inch black-and-white inkjet prints by Glenn Scarboro explores through street photography, landscapes, and portraits the social life and culture of southern Virginia in the 1960s and 1970s. About half of the photographs were taken in Danville, a small town with industries linked to tobacco, railroads, and textile mills, and the artist's hometown. Other images were taken in Richmond, Blacksburg, Roanoke, and other towns of the region. A dozen or so photographs were taken in other states such as Georgia and North Carolina, and there are a few from Rhode Island and New York.

The street scenes of Danville and other towns include images of white and African American residents of all ages and backgrounds, chiefly from the 1960s; small businesses; people and their cars; house exteriors and interiors; churches; and outdoor advertising and logos. One photograph is of the house of free black craftsman Thomas Day, in Milton, NC.

Rural themes include portraits of country people, barns and tobacco warehouses, livestock, and rural landscapes, with a large series of images particular focused on southern Virginia horse shows and county fairs.

There are no photographs of the social protests and political activities that took place in small towns such as Danville at that time, but the street photographs do speak to social culture and conditions in southern Virginia during the 1960s, and some, as the photographer notes, allude to the sense of social disruption and alienation in small-town Southern society.

The series ends with a series of portraits, chiefly of Scarboro and his immediate family, taken in the 1960s. One portrait of Scarboro in New York City was taken by photographer, instructor, and friend Emmet Gowin.

The collection also includes a 15-page handmade artist's book by Scarboro containing eleven black-and-white photographs taken in 1963 and printed from original negatives in 1965. The book was assembled in 1972 and is number six of a limited edition of seven, and features a unique cover with a pen-and-ink drawing.

A print inventory created by the photographer contains additional biographical narrative and commentary, and is available in the first box. The photographs are arranged in original order as received.

From the artist's statement: "There was a photograph in The Family of Man made by Jerry Cooke (originally published in Life magazine) of a woman sitting quite forlorn on a bench in a very dark place that gave no clues as to time, place, person or situation...which are the four psychiatric attributes of reality. She was alone. The quote under the photograph read, 'I am alone with the beating of my heart.' (Lui Chi) Making photographs in the streets of my hometown in the 60/70s calmed the beating of my unsettled heart and gave a face to the feelings of social alienation endemic to that time. Danville streets were the places of my earliest identity. In the process of becoming a close observer of ordinary life…I had become an artist.

Anxiety is always at the edge of identity."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Collection comprises correspondence, documents and print materials belonging to merchant and land owner Robert Anderson of Williamsburg and Yorktown, Virginia. The materials date from 1735-1908, with the bulk dating from 1735 to 1859, and consist of over eighty letters, both incoming and outgoing, many legal and financial papers, other manuscript documents, and ephemeral print items such as broadsides and circulars. One folder contains military muster lists and fines stemming from Anderson's service as clerk of the 68th regiment of the Virginia militia. Topics in the correspondence include slavery and slave trade, particularly in Virginia, colonization efforts, emancipation, the status of mixed-race individuals, Virginia and U.S. politics, Virginia military history, religion and church affairs, and education. Of particular note are several letters and documents relating to Anderson's children, who he fathered with one or more slaves; one of these children, Haidee, was sent to Eaglewood, a boarding school run by abolitionists Angelina Grimké Weld and Theodore Dwight Weld. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of correspondence, documents and ephemera belonging to merchant and land owner Robert Anderson of Williamsburg and Yorktown, Virginia. The materials date from 1735-1908, with the bulk dating from 1735-1859. The earliest document is a deed of gift of land from Thomas Vine of York County, Virginia, to his grandson.

There are over 100 pieces of incoming and outgoing correspondence dating from 1804 to 1859, with a few letters dated much later. Many of the retained copies and drafts are written on small slips of paper and docketed, which appears to have been Anderson's idiosyncratic method of dealing with his correspondence. Topics include religion and church matters; U.S. and Virginia politics; Virginia history; mercantile transactions; education; and slavery, including prices for slaves in the Richmond market, and Anderson's correspondence referring to purchases and sales of individual slaves. A printed circular letter from 1850 concerns colonization efforts to send freed slaves to Liberia.

Of note are several letters relating to children Anderson fathered with enslaved women, especially his daughter Haidee, who he sent to Eaglewood, the boarding school run by abolitionists Angelina Grimké and Theodore Dwight Weld; one long letter was written by Grimké to Anderson, exhorting him to emancipate Haidee and her mother. Eaglewood was part of the utopian community in Raritan Union Bay, New Jersey.

Stemming from Anderson's work as clerk for the 68th Regiment of the Virginia militia in James City County (Jamestown), there are 39 items, some written by Anderson, some by the Sheriff of Williamsburg, which consist chiefly of detailed muster lists and fines (1806-1858), and two printed lists of individuals receiving military pensions received due to an Act of Congress in 1828. Other documents in the collection refer to Virginia history during the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, and to the history of the Virginia Norfolk Junior Volunteers, founded in 1802, in which Anderson served.

There are also deeds, wills, and other documents; several dozen financial receipts; and a few printed and partially printed ephemeral items. Family names appearing in the deeds, bonds, and other documents are Bryan, Coke, Moody, Dickeson, Nelson, White, and Chapman. Among the later documents is a list of medical expenses from 1852 that seem to relate to Anderson's slaves or servants, and an 1858 bill for boarding school expenses for Haidee, signed by Theodore Weld. A document from 1855 records citizens protesting a request from the ship "Seabird" to land cargo and passengers, due to an outbreak of yellow fever in the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Thomas Smith was a resident of the burrough of Norfolk, Va. Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.