Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject American literature -- 19th century Remove constraint Subject: American literature -- 19th century

Search Results

collection icon

American Revolution Bicentennial Administration records, 1976-1977 1.5 Linear Feet

The American Revolution Bicentennial Administrstion was created by Congress in 1974 to encourage and coordinate local events commemorating the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. Collection includes copies of ARBA administrative materials.

Collection contains copies of ARBA administration papers including administration correspondence, advisory board files, N.C. Travelling Speakers History Courses information, and nomination forms. Originals of these are in the National Archives. Also included are the one hundred volumes chosen. The questionnaires asking for title nominations went to leading universities in each state and the U.S. territories. Then an advisory board of authorities, headed by Carlos Baker of Princeton, chose from these nominations the 100 titles to be newly printed. The books chosen span the entire period of American history; each one was individually redesigned, leather bound and tooled in gold. Many were newly illustrated by leading artists. Each work has notes from the editors such as pictures and information about the author, the work and its importance in American history. Part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

collection icon

Bliss Perry Whitman collection transcription, 1937 0.6 Linear Feet — 605 pages

Bliss Perry, was an American literary critic, writer, editor, and teacher. Collection comprises a four volume set of a 1937 typescript transcription made for Clifton Joseph Furness of Whitman materials offered for sale by Bliss Perry. Each volume in the collection (there is no volume 3) has a detailed table of contents.

Collection comprises a four volume set of a 1937 typescript transcription made for Clifton Joseph Furness of Whitman materials offered for sale by Bliss Perry. Each volume in the collection (there is no volume 3) has a detailed table of contents. Included are Volumes I and II, containing transcriptions of letters from correspondents, dated 1863-1928 and undated, among them Whitman, Richard Maurice Bucke, John Burroughs, Moncure D. Conway, William Sloane Kennedy, William D. O'Connor, and Horace Traubel. In the second volume there are also transcriptions of several manuscripts by Whitman and William D. O'Connor, including Whitman "on himself" and a note on A Backward Glance. Also includes transcriptions of seven newspaper clippings, an offprint of "Death of a Fireman" by Whitman, and an advertisement and circular regarding the sale of Whitman's books. There is also a transcription of the catalog for the Bliss Perry collection.

In collection volumes IV and V there are transcriptions of Whitman material held in other repositories, such as The Library of Congress, Pierpont Morgan Library, New York Public Library, and Harvard Library, among others. Includes typescript transcription, facsimiles, and photostatic copies of various letters, manuscripts, clippings, and articles. There is one original letter from John Addington Symonds to Walt Whitman (1872 Feb. 7).

collection icon

David Kelly Jackson papers, 1850 1925-1991 and undated 4.7 Linear Feet — 1860 Items

Duke University alumnus and independent scholar on Edgar Allan Poe and 19th century American literature. Correspondence, research, and writings on Edgar Allan Poe and other 19th century American writers, including Hardin E. Taliaferro and Augustin L. Taveau. Prominent correspondents include Clarence Gohdes, Jay B. Hubbell, Thomas Ollive Mabbott, Joel Myerson, Dwight Thomas, and J.H. Whitty. Research notes and writings include material on Jackson's books Poe and the Southern Literary Messenger, and The Poe Log: A Documentary Life of Edgar Allan Poe, 1809-1847, as well as articles by Poe scholars Richard Kopley and Benjamin Franklin Fisher. The collection is part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The David Kelly Jackson Papers span the years 1925 to 1991, with one item dating to 1850. The collection contains correspondence, research notes, and writings accumulated during Jackson's lifelong study of Edgar Allan Poe and other 19th century American writers. As documented by the Correspondence Series, Jackson's work in these areas led him to correspond with such literary scholars as Clarence Gohdes, Jay B. Hubbell, Thomas Ollive Mabbott, Joel Myerson, Dwight Thomas, and J.H. Whitty. A number of letters relate specifically to Jackson's research on two books: his first, Poe and the Southern Literary Messenger; and the 1987 book he co-authored with Thomas, The Poe Log. Drafts of the latter book, including a complete draft of Jackson's early, unpublished, solo version of it, comprise the bulk of the Writings Series. There is also a significant amount of his research on the Southern Literary Messenger, a Richmond, Virginia literary periodical that Poe once edited. The SLM files include a June 1850 letter to one of its contributors, Augustin L. Taveau. Finally, the series contains research materials pertaining to Hardin E. Taliaferro, a 19th-century North Carolina humorist whose writings Jackson collected into a book entitled Carolina Humor. The third series, Professional and Personal Activities, consists mainly of research in the form of various printed materials from such scholarly associations as the Poe Museum, the Edgar Allan Poe Society, the Poe Studies Association and the Society for the Study of Southern Literature. Also found here are articles written by Poe scholars Richard Kopley and Benjamin Franklin Fisher.

The David Kelly Jackson Papers are part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

collection icon

James Howard Whitty papers, 1792-1943 and undated 19 Linear Feet — Approx. 12,275 Items

Journalist, businessman, Poe scholar and editor, and an avid collector of Poe memorabilia; resided in Richmond, Virginia. The James Howard Whitty papers include letters, drafts of books and articles, research notes, newspaper clippings, and other papers, all relating to Whitty's writings on Edgar Allan Poe's life and career, his editorship of Poe's poetry, and his relationship with other literary scholars. The numerous clippings are found both loose and mounted in three scrapbooks. There is also a manuscript volume containing a Richmond, Virginia book seller's accounts. Other research materials on Poe consist of transcripts of Poe's letters and over 600 images related to Poe's life. There is voluminous correspondence from Poe scholars and other literary critics, including George Woodberry, Mary E. Phillips, and Thomas O. Mabbott. Whitty's research papers also contain copies of letters from John C. Frémont to Joel Poinsett in 1838, research material and correspondence relating to Virginia planter and early Congressman John Randolph of Roanoke, and the history of Richmond, Virginia.

Papers of James Howard Whitty, author and authority on the life and work of Edgar Allan Poe, are chiefly comprised of correspondence, research writings and notes, printed material such as clippings and engravings, and copies of 19th century correspondence, all relating to Whitty's writings on literary figures and Virginia history.

Whitty's research materials on Edgar Allen Poe include copies of a large number of letters by Edgar Allan Poe and members of his family; documents concerning the events surrounding Poe's death; a large amount of correspondence with other Poe scholars, particularly George E. Woodberry, Mary E. Phillips, and Thomas Ollive Mabbott; and research notes made by Whitty, including material for a complete Poe bibliography, and rough drafts of Whitty's writings on Poe. There are also over 600 images, chiefly engravings, including portraits of Poe and his family, images of the places where Poe lived, and the museums and shrines dedicated to him. In addition, there are letters relating to Whitty's work as organizer and first president of the Edgar Allan Poe shrine in Richmond, Virginia, and to Whitty's quarrel with the directors of the shrine in 1924.

The hundreds of clippings included in this collection consist of what seems to be almost every article or mention of Poe from 1900-1935. Many of the articles are in duplicate and many of them contain notations by Whitty. There are also three scrapbooks of clippings.

Other materials center on Whitty's interest in the history of Richmond, Virginia; business correspondence pertaining to Whitty's work on the staff of the Richmond Times; notes on and copies of correspondence of John Randolph of Roanoke, 1814-1816 (Virginia planter and Congressman) to Ann Morris, in which he accuses her of being a common prostitute and the murderess of her child and of his brother. Copies of her answers to his accusations are also included. Whitty was interested in writing on John Randolph of Roanoke, but apparently never did so. Additional research materials include notes on and copies of letters from John Charles Frémont to Joel R. Poinsett, 1838; and other printed material, including reviews, copies of sections of books, publication notices, and advertisements. There is also a manuscript volume containing the accounts of a Richmond bookseller, 1929-1936.

collection icon

Walt Whitman papers, 1841-1940, bulk 1841-1891 28 Linear Feet

Collection includes correspondence separated into two subseries: "Letters To or About Walt Whitman," and "Letters From or By Walt Whitman." Most of Whitman's letters in the collection were written between 1880 and 1891. Letters include those written to and from friends, family members, editors, publishers, and soldiers Whitman met in and around Washington, D. C. during the Civil War. The Clippings Series includes both large groups of clippings collected and annotated by Whitman, and clippings Whitman took from complete or nearly complete articles. Also included are manuscripts and printed materials about or relating to Whitman, most of which date during Whitman's lifetime. There are portraits, etchings, engravings, and sketches both of Whitman and of his brother, George, and sister, Hannah. A Writings Series contains manuscript and printed versions of poetry and prose dating from Whitman's career in journalism up to the end of his life. It is divided into four subseries: Manuscript Poems (1855-1882 and undated); Manuscript Prose (1852-1891 and undated); Proofs (1874-1891 and undated); and Periodicals Containing Contributions by Whitman (1841-1891).

The Walt Whitman papers incorporates material spanning the dates 1841-1940, with the bulk of the material dating from 1841-1891. The virtual reorganization of the collection, based upon that devised by Ellen F. Frey in A Bibliography of Walt Whitman (Port Washington, NY: Kennikat Press, 1945), divides it into six series: Correspondence, Writings, Clippings, Material About or Relating to Whitman, Portraits, and Miscellany.

Items marked as unavailable are currently missing.

Correspondence is separated into two subseries: "Letters To or About Walt Whitman," and "Letters From or By Walt Whitman." Most of Whitman's letters in the collection were written between 1880 and 1891. The Clippings Series lists both large groups of clippings collected and annotated by Whitman, and clippings Whitman took from complete or nearly complete articles. Whenever possible, these have been dated according to the periodical in which the articles originally appeared. Material About or Relating to Whitman is comprised of subseries that catalog manuscript versions of Richard Maurice Bucke's biography of Whitman, as well as other manuscript material written by Whitman or recorded by his friends. The Portraits Series includes formal photographic and painted portraits, etchings, engravings, and sketches, both of Whitman and of his brother, George, and sister, Hannah. The Miscellany consists of ephemera related to Whitman's life and career as a poet. Two scrapbooks, book wrappers for the first edition of Leaves of Grass, and documents relating to the Whitman fund are listed among this series' eclectic contents.

By far the largest series in the collection, the Writings Series contains manuscript and printed versions of poetry and prose dating from Whitman's career in journalism to the end of his life. It is divided into four subseries: Manuscript Poems (1855-1882 and undated); Manuscript Prose (1852-1891 and undated); Proofs (1874-1891 and undated); and Periodicals Containing Contributions by Whitman (1841-1891). The first subseries, "Manuscript Poems," is further subdivided into categories intended to define three separate levels of poetic composition: manuscript versions of poems that appear in at least one edition of Leaves of Grass, manuscript versions of poems not published in Leaves of Grass, and verse fragments and outlines. The researcher is advised to consult the NYU Collected Writings of Walt Whitman, particularly Harold W. Blodgett and Sculley Bradley, eds., Leaves of Grass: A Comprehensive Reader's Edition (New York: NYUP, 1965), pp. 585-706, for publication of previously uncollected material. Although older, Oscar Lovell Triggs, ed., Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman, vol. 3 of 10 (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1902) and Clarence Gohdes and Rollo G. Silver, eds., Faint Clews and Indirections: Manuscripts of Walt Whitman and His Family (Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1949) are also helpful, the former particularly when used alongside Frey's Bibliography.

The Manuscript Prose Subseries in the Writings Series is further divided into seven categories. The first three are comprised of manuscript versions of stories, prefaces, and essays and lectures, respectively. Four less distinct subheadings follow. "Notes on Literature" represents an almost exact transliteration of Frey's category of the same name, however it should be noted that this category does not, at the time of writing, list all of Trent's holdings in Whitman's literary-critical manuscripts. Some literary criticism is contained in "Autobiographical Manuscripts" and "Whitman on His Own Writings," along with more purely impressionistic self-reflection. "Miscellany" should also be consulted, as it brings together in an unsystematic way Whitman's notes on travel, reading, and education as well as a scattering of notes on poetry and different forms of literary production.

The last two subseries of the Writings Series bring together various published versions of Whitman's writing. Annotated proofs of his poetry and prose are identified in the finding aid, and cross-references are included between the Proofs Subseries and the Periodicals Containing Contributions by Whitman Subseries in instances where the collection lists both a proof and a published version of a poem or article among its headings. The Periodicals Containing Contributions by Whitman Subseries provides a survey of his writing during his lifetime.

Many published works by and about Walt Whitman and housed in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library have been cataloged individually. These can be found by searching the Duke online catalog.