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American Literature records, 1927-2000s 43 Linear Feet — 32,075 items

The earliest documents date from 1927, the year before the first issue was published. New material will continue to arrive as the journal's office deems files inactive. The bulk of the journal's papers consists of correspondence and editorial comments on submitted articles.

Aside from a relatively few submissions which seem to have been rejected after a single reading by the chair or other in-house editor (because they were too long or clearly unsuitable for the journal), articles were sent out to at least two members of the Editorial Board. They sent back written comments and a recommendation (reject, accept, accept pending revision). These responses make up the Editorial Comments Series(1928-1983) and a portion of the Correspondence and Editorial comments Series(1984-1989). By the late 1980s, the journal was receiving several hundred submissions each year, but the editorial comments suggest that the proportion of fine articles in the pool had not been maintained as sheer numbers increased. Members of the Editorial Board take on this responsibility in addition to their normal institutional duties.

The comments in the Editorial Comments Series are sometimes brief and dismissive, sometimes quite elaborate. Even in the absence of the rejected articles themsleves, they are a rich record of individual and institutional critical predispositions. In its early years, the journal was working to establish a solid documentary foundation for the profession of American literary study. Favored topics were unpublished manuscripts, biographical work, and influence studies. The journal was slow to accept the move to New Critical interpretations of texts, reluctant to give up its tradition of more empirical scholarship. Such moments of critical change or expansion - late 1960s psychoanalytical criticism, 1970s feminist readings, 1980s post-structuralism, etc. - are vividly documented by the Editorial Board's varied members. Not infrequently, one reader will enjoy the provocative nature of an article, while the other considers it to be careless scholarship or too polemical.

Most of the correspondence is in the Alphabeticaland Correspondence Series.It deals with submitted articles or reviews, but there are more substantial letters dealing with policy, critical positions, and disputes (primarily about reviews).

All other papers are contained in the Subject Files Series.Included there are correspondence preceding and relevant to the inception of the journal; Foerster Prize records; materials relating to the selection of editors and the formulation of policy; annual reports to the American Literature Section of the MLA; materials relating to Duke Press and publicity; and information gathered in the early years about who was doing what with American literature (for the purpose of mapping the field and finding reviewers).

Additionally in the Card Files Seriesthere are three boxes sized for 3 x 5 cards which are full of information saved by the American Literature offices between (roughly) 1928 and 1950. These constitute something like a scrapbook of American literature, containing: bibliography cards; sketches of periods and genres; course descriptions; etc. These materials are typed and handwritten. Finally, there are samples of the 5 x 7 cards used to process and keep track of submissions and book reviews. These cards do not contain information (in either their content or organization) that is unavailable elsewhere, but they do illustrate the process by which articles and book reviews were handled.

The accessions (2009-0177) and (2009-0242) include editorial comments and correspondence from American Literature, beginning in 1993 and continuing through the early 2000s. Materials are organized alphabetically by each person's last name.

(by box/period divisions, including only regular contributors)

  1. William B. Cairns
  2. Jay B. Hubbell
  3. Kenneth Murdock
  4. Fred Lewis Pattee
  5. Ralph Rusk
  1. William B. Cairns
  2. Jay B. Hubbell (minimal)
  3. Kenneth Murdock
  4. Ralph Rusk
  5. Robert Spiller
  1. Killis Campbell
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
  1. Norman Foerster (some)
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
  5. Laurance Thompson
  1. Norman Foerster
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
  1. Norman Foerster
  2. Clarence Gohdes (some)
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
  5. Stanley Williams
  1. Norman Foerster
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Robert Spiller
  4. Stanley Williams
  1. Emory Holloway
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Austin Warren
  4. Stanley Williams
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. James D. Hart
  3. Willard Thorp
  4. George Whicher
  1. Walter Blair
  2. Harry Hayden Clark
  3. Willard Thorp
  4. George Whicher
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. James D. Hart
  3. Willard Thorp
  4. George Whicher
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. James D. Hart
  3. Fred B. Millett
  4. Willard Thorp
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. Ernest Leisy
  3. Fred B. Millett
  4. Willard Thorp
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. Ernest Leisy
  3. Henry Nash Smith
  4. Willard Thorp
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. Ernest Leisy
  3. Russell Nye
  4. Henry Nash Smith
  1. Lewis Leary
  2. Norman Pearson
  3. Henry Pochmann
  1. Charles R. Anderson
  2. Edwin Cady
  3. Theodore Hornberger
  4. Lewis Leary
  5. Norman Pearson
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Henry Nash Smith
  8. Floyd Stovall
  9. George Whicher
  1. Charles R. Anderson
  2. Edwin Cady
  3. Theodore Hornberger
  4. Lewis Leary
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Floyd Stovall
  8. George Whicher
  1. Charles R. Anderson
  2. Edwin Cady
  3. William Charvat
  4. Theodore Hornberger
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Floyd Stovall
  1. Edwin Cady
  2. William Charvat
  3. R.H. Fogle
  4. Theodore Hornberger
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Sherman Paul
  7. Henry Pochmann
  8. Floyd Stovall
  1. James Beard
  2. Walter Blair
  3. William Charvat
  4. R.H. Fogle
  5. James D. Hart
  6. Theodore Hornberger
  7. Russel Nye
  8. Sherman Paul
  9. Henry Pochmann
  10. Ernest Samuels
  1. William Charvat
  2. Richard B. Davis
  3. R.H. Fogle
  4. James D. Hart
  5. Theodore Hornberger
  6. Russel Nye
  7. Ernest Samuels
  1. Gay Wilson Allen
  2. George Arms
  3. William Charvat
  4. Richard B. Davis
  5. R.H. Fogle
  6. James D. Hart
  7. Russel Nye
  8. Ernest Samuels
  1. Gay Wilson Allen
  2. George Arms
  3. Richard B. Davis
  4. R.H. Fogle
  5. James D. Hart
  6. Russel Nye
  7. Henry Pochmann
  8. Ernest Samuels
  9. Floyd Stovall
  1. Gay Wilson Allen
  2. George Arms
  3. Richard B. Davis
  4. John T. Flanagan
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Ernest Samuels
  1. Richard P. Adams
  2. Gay Wilson Allen
  3. George Arms
  4. James M. Cox
  5. John T. Flanagan
  6. R.H. Fogle
  7. Allen Guttmann
  8. David Levin
  9. Russel Nye
  10. Henry Pochmann
  11. Ernest Samuels
  12. John D. Seelye
  13. Lewis P. Simpson
  1. Richard P. Adams
  2. James M. Cox
  3. Lawrence S. Dembo
  4. Warren G. French
  5. Allen Guttmann
  6. Annette Kolodny
  7. David Levin
  8. Russel Nye
  9. Donald Pizer
  10. Patrick F. Quinn
  11. John D. Seelye
  12. Walter Sutton
  1. Sacvan Bercovitch
  2. Lawrence S. Dembo
  3. Warren G. French
  4. Annette Kolodny
  5. J.A. Leo Lemay
  6. Jay Martin
  7. Terence Martin
  8. Roy Harvey Pearce
  9. H. Dan Piper
  10. Donald Pizer
  11. Joel M. Porte
  12. Patrick F. Quinn
  13. Walter B. Rideout
  14. John D. Seelye
  15. Walter Sutton
  16. G. Thomas Tanselle
  17. Darwin Turner
  1. Nina Baym
  2. Sacvan Bercovitch
  3. Panthea Broughton
  4. Lawrence Buell
  5. Don Cook
  6. Hamlin Hill
  7. Annette Kolodny
  8. J.A. Leo Lemay
  9. T. Martin
  10. Hershel Parker
  11. Roy Harvey Pearce
  12. H. Dan Piper
  13. Joel M. Porte
  14. Walter B. Rideout
  15. Charles Scruggs
  16. G. Thomas Tanselle
  17. Linda Wagner
  1. Elizabeth Ammons
  2. Martha Banta
  3. Nina Baym
  4. Lawrence Buell
  5. Cathy Davidson
  6. Scott Donaldson
  7. Norman Grabo
  8. Philip Gura
  9. Hamlin Hill
  10. Marcus N. Klein
  11. J.C. Levenson
  12. Horace Porter
  13. Donald A. Ringe
  14. Charles Scruggs
  15. Kenneth Silverman
  16. Werner Sollors
  17. Robert Stepto
  18. Linda Wagner
  19. Christof A. Wegelin
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Former English Professor at Duke University, and Vice-Provost for Interdisciplinary Affairs. Author of fiction and memoirs, and editor of The Book of Love and Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States. The Cathy Davidson Papers encompass Davidson's various writings, organizational work, correspondence, and materials related to Fred Hampton.

The Cathy Davidson Papers encompass Davidson's various writings, organizational work, correspondence, and materials related to Fred Hampton. The Writings Series includes her research and assemblage of famous authors' love letters (Book of Love), as well as drafts of various books, short stories, writing workshops, and publication matters. The Organizations and Professional Activities Series includes files relating to her work with the American Studies Association, the American Literature Section of the MLA, and the American Literature Association, as well as various other professional activities. Part of Davidson's Duke career is documented in the papers as well, particularly her work with the MacArthur Foundation grant for learning institutions in a digital age, as well as some HASTAC materials. The Fred Hampton Materials pertain to the assassination of Fred Hampton in 1969 and Davidson's related photography projects. This series is closed until 2017. Additionaly, permission from Cathy Davidson is required to view any materials in accession 2012-0248 (boxes 21-23) during her lifetime.

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Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes papers, 1811-1990s and undated, bulk 1905-1981, bulk 1905-1981 6.2 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — Approximately 4650 items — 4650 Items

Collection consists of research materials, correspondence, writings, clippings and other printed materials, and a few photographs, mainly from the latter half of Gohdes's career. The earliest date (1811) refers to reproductions of original research materials. Correspondence with other American Literature teachers and authors, combined with other materials relating to Gohdes's institutional and organizational affiliations, in particular with Duke University, the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the journal AMERICAN LITERATURE, comprise the most substantive aspects of this collection. They provide insight into American literary scholarship in the early and mid-twentieth century. Noted authors and scholars of the time whose letters and other writings are in the collection include Alexander Blackburn, Oscar Cargill, Lewis Chase, Robert Elias, Norman Foerster, Arthur Rubin, Arthur Quinn, and Upton Sinclair. Original manuscripts by Gohdes, inscribed reprints of writings by his colleagues, and materials relating to many major British and American literary figures, make up the rest of the collection. There is substantial material on Edgar Allen Poe and American humor. The collection also includes papers documenting Gohdes's research and writing for his last book project, a history of the muscadine grape in North Carolina entitled Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography

The Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes Papers date from 1811 to the 1990s, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1905 to 1981. Collection consists of research materials, correspondence, writings, clippings and other printed materials, and a few photographs, mainly from the latter half of Gohdes's career. The earliest date (1811) refers to reproductions of original materials used in his research. Correspondence with other American Literature teachers and authors, combined with other materials relating to Gohdes's institutional and organizational affiliations, in particular with Duke University, the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the journal AMERICAN LITERATURE, comprise the most substantive aspects of this collection. They provide insight into the bureaucratic and institutional exigencies of American literary scholarship in the early and mid-twentieth century. Noted authors and scholars of the time whose letters and other writings are in the collection include Alexander Blackburn, Oscar Cargill, Lewis Chase, Robert Elias, Norman Foerster, Arthur Rubin, Arthur Quinn, and Upton Sinclair. Original manuscripts by Gohdes, inscribed reprints of writings by his colleagues, and materials relating to many major British and American literary figures, make up the rest of the collection. There is substantial material on Edgar Allen Poe and American humor. The collection also includes papers documenting Gohdes's research and writing for his last book project, a history of the muscadine grape entitled Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines.

The Gohdes Papers are divided into seven series: Biographical Data, Correspondence, Author Files, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, Scuppernong , and Clippings.

The Biographical Data Series briefly sketches the major events of Gohdes's life. It consists of only a few items, including a one-page sketch by Gohdes of his career's highlights, and photocopies of Gohdes's obituaries. Further biographical information, especially pertaining to Gohdes's academic life, can be culled from materials in the Correspondence Series.

The Correspondence Series contains letters exchanged with university administrators, publishers, colleagues, librarians, and literary figures. The series is divided into four subseries, American Literature , Lewis Chase, Duke University, and General. The bulk of the correspondence concerns professional and academic affairs, such as appointments, editorships, research and reviews, and publishing. Included are exchanges between Gohdes and Duke University administrators about English Department and American Literature affairs, as well as between Gohdes and contemporary literary critics about the study of American literature. There are also several documents that illuminate Gohdes's political affiliations and social concerns.

Materials on approximately fifty authors, largely major British and American writers, are in the Author Files Series and were originally gathered by Gohdes and his colleague, Lewis Chase. The folders contain a variety of information on the represented authors, in an equally varied mix of formats: clippings, notes, lectures, student papers, photographs, and reproductions or photocopies of original writing.

Included in the Subject Files Series are materials relating to several projects and interests which engaged Gohdes during his career. These include: bibliographies, poetry, travel narratives and the American West, and the United Nations' Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)/American Literature Section's Best American Books List. The bibliographies collected in this series reflect Gohdes's interest in this genre, as he participated in and edited many such projects throughout his career.

The Writings and Speeches Series contains manuscript and printed materials in two subseries: Writings by Gohdes and Writings by Others. The Writings by Gohdes Subseries includes manuscripts of short stories, poetry, and academic essays, as well as notes and notecards. The manuscripts also contain folders pertaining to unfinished projects and writings. The Writings by Gohdes Subseries also contains several folders of printed materials, consisting of reprints and reproductions of as well as advertising and promotional materials for Gohdes's published writings. This subseries consists almost entirely of reprints that are inscribed to Gohdes by the authors.

Materials relating to the writing and research of Gohdes's last published book, Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines, are in the Scuppernong Series. Three subseries make up this series: Correspondence, Research and Notes, and Publication Materials. Correspondence plus photocopied articles and essays about the grape and agricultural production form the bulk of the series. Also included are Gohdes's many notes and notecards, as well as reviews and materials relating to the book's publication.

The Clippings Series contains the few clippings that are not housed in the Author Files Series. These clippings mostly consist of articles relating to literary figures.

Related collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library include the records of American Literature and the Modern Language Association's American Literature Section, as well as the papers of many of Gohdes's colleagues, such as Jay B. Hubbell and Arlin Turner.

Processing Note:

Roman numerals and transcribed titles taken from the original folders have been appended to certain folders, such as the Contemporary Poetry Selections.

Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.

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Dorothy Allison papers, 1965-2010 92.5 Linear Feet — 69,375 Items

Dorothy Allison is an author and feminist who has written numerous books and short stories, including Trash (1988), Bastard Out of Carolina (1992), and Cavedweller (1998). The Dorothy Allison Papers include drafts and manuscripts of her writings (including Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, Cavedweller, and other works), personal and professional correspondence, research materials and subject files, her personal journals, and other materials. Includes some photographs, electronic files, and oversize materials. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Dorothy Allison Papers include drafts and manuscripts of her writings (including Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, Cavedweller, and other works). All of Allison's unpublished works are RESTRICTED and require permission from the creator prior to use. Personal and professional correspondence, including exchanges with her publishers and other authors, are held in the chronological and work files. The collection also contains Allison's research materials and subject files, covering topics on feminism, lesbianism, sexuality, pornography, writing, and other related files. Allison's journals, dating from 1985 through the 2000s, consist of both handwritten and electronic formats, with all of the electronic journals printed for the archive. All of Allison's journals are RESTRICTED and require permission from the creator prior to use. Also included are materials from her speaking engagements, workshops, and other professional activities. There are a variety of special formats within the collection, including some photographs, electronic files, audio tapes, video cassettes, DVDs, and oversize posters.

Collection was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Edith Ella Baldwin papers, 1848-1920 4.1 Linear Feet — 39 Items

Artist, craftswoman, and author from Worcester, Massachusetts. Collection consists of 39 unpublished volumes of stories, novels, poetry, lecture notes, and family history from Edith Ella Baldwin, including a novel about sex education for women, diary excerpts describing her visits with painter Mary Cassatt, and typescript copies of letters from her aunt, Ellen Frances Baldwin, dating from 1848 to 1854. Edith Baldwin's writings tend to cover timeless themes of religion and love, although some compositions include contemporary issues such as automobiles, labor strikes, and women's rights. Each volume is arts-and-crafts style construction with typed texts, frequently annotated by hand.

The collection and its volumes represent over 20 years of work by Edith Ella Baldwin. There is no indication that any of her writings were published, although rejection letters included in one of the volumes suggests that she did attempt to become published at one point.

Each volume consists of typescript or carbon copy pages, sewn into cloth boards with dyed red cloth covers stamped with gold lettering; two volumes are burlap and one is corduroy. Some of the volumes' bindings are loose or separated from their covers. The texts have been copy-edited with corrections throughout, along with several re-titled in pencil. Most volumes' title pages include notes explaining whether the work is a fragment, unfinished, or complete; how they "must not be changed"; and how many are "the only copy in existence." Several stories also include Baldwin's handwritten introduction, summarizing the action or presenting the theme.

Many of the stories explore love and religion, but several are noteworthy for their contemporary subjects. "The Automobile" is a short story written in 1907 following two women as they tour New England in their Pope Hartford automobile. "Antony the Foreigner," an unpublished 1912 novel, concerns anarchists, labor strikes, worker unrest, and the suspicion of foreigners. The most notable text is the 1911 "Affairs at Farslope," a 140-page novella about a women's refuge for troubled young girls and how proper sex education could have prevented their misfortune.

Along with Baldwin's fiction and poetry, the collection includes lecture notes from several courses she took on bookbinding, cooking, nursing, and art. There are also her efforts at preserving her family's history, including a copy of her aunt's diary, dated 1848-1854; several of her grandfather's sermons; a volume of stories and poems by her younger sister, who died at age 11; and selected excerpts of her own journal kept while studying art in Paris from 1889-1892.

The materials have been arranged by genre, with the Fiction and Poetry Series making up the bulk of the collection; the Non-Fiction Series consisting largely of lecture notes and diary entries; and the Family History Series, which includes her aunt's diary, other family writings, and sermons. Within each series, materials have been arranged chronologically.

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The papers consist of correspondence from Jay B. Hubbell and John Olin Eidson. The Eidson letters (5 items) discuss the upcoming program of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association of America and suggest Richard Armour as the featured speaker. The letters are arranged chronologically.

Accession (1992-0127) (20,000 items, 30.0 lin. ft.) includes correspondence, research and teaching notes, writings, student offprints, card files, photostats, materials relating to the Center for Editions of American Authors, files relating to American Literature, printed matter, clippings, and other miscellaneous items. Correspondence includes letters from Jay B. Hubbell and John O. Eidson; the latter concern the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association.

Accession (2002-0104), dated 1858-2000 (1251 items; 6.8 linear feet) primarily comprises materials related to writings by Cady and his former student Thomas F. O'Donnell regarding author, editor, and critic William Dean (W.D.) Howells. In 2000, Cady edited and wrote an introduction to a volume of Howells' poetry entitled Pebbles, Monochromes, and Other Modern Poems, 1891-1916, and his collection holds various drafts of this work as well as correspondence between Cady and his publishers concerning the book's publication. Also included is material written by or collected by Cady or O'Donnell while editing or writing other books and articles regarding Howells' poetry; and original correspondence from Howells to his publishers.

Accession (2010-0083) (300 items; 7.5 lin. ft.) includes books by and about William Dean Howells, most with annotations by Edwin Cady and Harry H. Clark, as well as materials (first proofs, drafts, and other Howells publications) that were used by Cady in the preparation of Howells' complete works. Books date from approximately 1881-1981; manuscript materials date from approximately 1879-1992.

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Harriet R. Holman papers, 1869-1986 16.5 Linear Feet — About 7899 Items

Author and professor of English from Anderson, S.C. Collection is chiefly significant for Holman's correspondence with writers, publishers and colleagues concerning the teaching and writing of American literature. Significant correspondents include Jay B. Hubbell, Rayburn Moore, Henry Field, Ann Page Johns, Armistead C. Gordon, Jr., Dr. Jeremiah N. Fusco, Corydon Bell, Guy Davenport, Edith Buchanan, Margaret Meaders, David Stocking, Marion Kingston Stocking, Newman I. White, E. M. Lander, Jr., Mattie U. Russell, and members of the Thomas Nelson Page and John Fox families. There are also letters from South Carolina authors, including Rosa Pendleton Chiles, Sidelle Ellis, Patricia Kneas Hill, Katharine M. Jones, Mary Boone Robertson Longley, and Alice L. O'Connell. Also includes works written or edited by Holman and others, a typed transcription of Cherokee stories as told by Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey, clippings, notecard files, printed material, and photographs of Thomas Nelson and Florence Lathrop Page, and Nannie Mae Tilley.

The papers of Harriet Rebecca Holman span the years 1869-1986, and are chiefly significant for Holman's correspondence with writers, publishers and colleagues concerning the teaching and writing of American literature. Significant correspondents include Jay B. Hubbell, Rayburn Moore, Henry Field, Ann Page Johns, Armistead C. Gordon, Jr., Dr. Jeremiah N. Fusco, Corydon Bell, Guy Davenport, Edith Buchanan, Margaret Meaders, David Stocking, Marion Kingston Stocking, Newman I. White, E. M. Lander, Jr., Mattie U. Russell and members of the Thomas Nelson Page and John Fox families. The Page family materials constitute a large portion of the materials in this collection and are represented by their own series. There are also letters from South Carolina authors, including Rosa Pendleton Chiles, Sidelle Ellis, Patricia Kneas Hill, Katharine M. Jones, Mary Boone Robertson Longley, and Alice L. O'Connell. Also includes works written or edited by Holman and others, a typed transcription of Cherokee stories as told by Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey, clippings, notecard files, printed material, and photographs of Thomas Nelson and Florence Lathrop Page, and Nannie Mae Tilley. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.

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James Leslie Woodress papers, 1941-1976 2.4 Linear Feet — 1112 Items

Professor of American literature at the University of California, Davis. The James Leslie Woodress Papers span the years from 1941 to 1976. The collection (2.4 linear feet) consists mainly of professional papers including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, editors and publishers, copyright holders, libraries, and others regarding the production of a number of Woodress' published works on the history of American literature.

The James Leslie Woodress Papers span the years from 1941 to 1976. The collection consists mainly of professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, editors and publishers, copyright holders, libraries, and others regarding the production of a number of Woodress' published works, including Booth Tarkington: Gentleman from Indiana, Dissertations in American Literature, Eight American Authors, Essays Mostly on Periodical Publishing in America: A Collection in Honor of Clarence Gohdes, Howells and Italy, A Yankee's Odyssey: The Life of Joel Barlow, and "Voices from America's Past," a historical pamphlets series. Among the significant correspondents are Ashbel G. Brice and John Menapace of the Duke University Press, Elizabeth Blackert and Robert F. Wilson of McGraw-Hill, and scholars such as Walter Blair, Hugh Holman, Jay B. Hubbell, Lewis Leary, Floyd Stovall, and Willard Thorp. Background notes and drafts of publication materials are also contained in the collection. The collection is divided into seven series, corresponding to Woodress' published works and arranged in alphabetical order by title: Booth Tarkington, Dissertations in American Literature, Eight American Authors, Essays Mostly on Periodical Publishing in America, Howells and Italy, Voices from America's Past, and Yankee's Odyssey. These series are described fully below. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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John Olin Eidson papers, 1849-1985 10.5 Linear Feet — Approximately 923 Items

Professor of American Literature, President of Georgia Southern College from 1968 to 1971, and editor of the Georgia Review from 1950 to 1957. Collection contains John Olin Eidson's research papers pertaining to Alfred Lord Tennyson in America. There are copies of reviews of Tennyson's dramatic works and of performances by Mrs. D. P. Bowers, actress. Also included are notes, writings, and clippings about American authors (Thomas Wolfe, Charles Stearns Wheeler, John Hall Wheelock, and many others).

Collection contains papers pertaining to research on Alfred Lord Tennyson in America, which was the subject of Eidson's Duke University thesis in 1941, and led to the publication of Tennyson in America, His Reputation and Influence From 1827 to 1858. There are copies of reviews of Tennyson's dramatic works and of performances by Mrs. D. P. Bowers, actress (1830-1895). Also included are notes, writings, and clippings about American authors (Thomas Wolfe, Charles Stearns Wheeler, John Hall Wheelock, and many others). Box titles taken directly from container labels.

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John Seelye was a professor of English and American Literature at the University of California at Berkeley, University of Connecticut, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dartmouth College, and the University of Florida. The papers of John Seelye span the years 1862-2015, with the bulk of the papers dated between 1955 and 2007, covering Seelye's professional career as both an scholar and as an editor of the Penguin Classics series for literature. Although there are files related to his teaching and career as an academic, the emphasis of the collection is on Seelye's work as author and editor. The collection consists of correspondence (sent and received) and contracts; subject files Seelye maintained at each of his institutions and for his research; writings by Seelye, including book reviews, poetry, articles and prose, as well as books, including a copy of the Life of Asa G. Sheldon: Wilmington Farmer (1862); and personal items, which include incoming correspondence intended for Suzanne Everett Throop, who received a large number of love letters from "Marguerite" between 1897 and 1898 and some additional letters from "Harriet" and "Chandler" in the 1920s. Subjects in the papers include Mark Twain, the literary criticism and interpretation of Herman Melville's works and American literature generally, the West in fiction, rivers in the United States, cowboys in popular culture, the history of Plymouth Rock, and the publishing of poetry in the United States.

The papers of John Seelye span the years 1862-2015, with the bulk of the papers dated between 1955 and 2007, covering Seelye's professional career as both an scholar and as an editor of the Penguin Classics series for literature. Although there are files related to his teaching and career as an academic, the emphasis of the collection is on Seelye's work as author and editor. The Correspondence and Contracts Series includes primarily professional correspondence sent (1956-2014) and received (1958-2012 and undated) by Seelye, as well as contracts and supporting documents focusing on Seelye's contact with his publishers. The Academia Series contains subject files Seelye maintained during his professional career while at the University of California at Berkeley (1959-1965), the University of Connecticut (1966-1974), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1974-1984), the University of Florida (1984-2008), and Dartmouth (1982-1992). The Research/Subject Files Series includes materials related to research Seelye carried out to support his writings as well as subject files on people and topics of interest to him or related to other work he carried out. The Writings Series contains drafts, notes, edits, and published versions of Seelye's book reviews, film reviews, poetry, and prose, including his numerous scholarly and fiction essays and articles, books, and edited works. The Personal series contains assorted materials relevant to Seelye's life, including several versions of his curriculum vitae as well as early report cards, photographs and headshots, and school newspapers from his various schools. Also includes a Bible owned by Dwight L. Moody and incoming correspondence intended for Suzanne Everett Throop, including a large number of love letters from "Marguerite" between 1897 and 1898 and some additional letters from "Harriet" and "Chandler" in the 1920s. Subjects in the papers include Mark Twain, the literary criticism and interpretation of Herman Melville's works and American literature generally, the West in fiction, rivers in the United States, cowboys in popular culture, the history of Plymouth Rock, and the publishing of poetry in the United States.