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Allan Gurganus Papers, 1961-2019 65 Linear Feet

Allan Gurganus (1947- ), a gay, white, Southern writer, was born in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. Gurganus trained as a painter, served in the United States Navy during the Vietnam War, then studied at Sarah Lawrence College and the Iowa Writers' Workshop. He later taught writing at Sarah Lawrence College; the Iowa Writers' Workshop; Stanford University; and Duke University. The collection includes the following series: (1) Writings; (2) Correspondence; (3) Personal Papers; (4) Artwork; and (5) Others' Works.

The (1) Writings Series is divided into the Books, Novellas and Articles subseries, Uncollected Works subseries, and Addresses and Speeches subseries. Gurganus's writings, collected here as manuscripts, typescripts, and proofs with notes, documenting his development of well-known and critically-acclaimed works. His collected works include White People; The Practical Heart; Plays Well with Others; and, Local Souls. Gurganus's other books and individual stories, essays, and drawings or illustrations related to the titles are included in this Series.

The (2) Correspondence Series is divided into the Chronological Correspondence subseries which consists of letters to and from Gurganus, publishers, and friends, and the Correspondence, Alphabetical by Name subseries is comprised of correspondence between Gurganus and other writers, artists, literary figures, and close friends.

The (3) Personal Papers Series contains Gurganus's family correspondence, documents, many of the books, letters, art and photographs kept in his home. Financial and legal records as well as documentation of his writing career through contracts and royalty statements are also included in this series. The (4) Artwork Series is comprised of doodles, drawings, paintings, and sketches. Series (5) Others' Works, includes books, articles, and typescripts written by friends, students, and others.

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Arlin Turner papers, 1927-1980 15.6 Linear Feet — circa 9750 Items

The papers span Turner's career as a scholar of American literature, from his undergraduate education at West Texas State University in 1927 to his death in 1980, when he was an instructor at Southwest Texas State University. Comprised primarily of personal and professional correspondence with scholars and publishers of American literature, including Gay Wilson Allen, John Q. Anderson, Louis Budd, Robert Cantwell, James B. Colvert, Eddie Gay Cone, Benjamin Franklin Fisher, Albert Mordell, Norman Holmes Pearson, William Stafford, and Edmund Wilson. There are also letters, printed matter, reports, and minutes that Turner collected as a member or officer of organizations, including the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association, Committee for American Studies, and the Associated Research Council. The Turner Papers also document the development of high school, collegiate, and graduate level instruction in American literature through the organizational records and course materials, the latter of which include Turner's personal writings and research notes, subject files, clippings, lecture notes, and other printed materials on various authors or genres of American literature, including Southern literature, American humor, Nathaniel Hawthorne and George Washington Cable.

The Arlin Turner Papers, 1927-1980, span Turner's entire career as a scholar of American literature, from his undergraduate education at West Texas State University in 1927 to his death in 1980, when he was an instructor at Southwest Texas State University. The Turner Papers are comprised primarily of personal and professional correspondence with scholars and publishers of American literature. The correspondence includes letters, printed matter, reports, and minutes that Turner collected as a member or officer of organizations to which many of these literary scholars belonged. These materials, in addition to the clippings, printed materials and other writings Turner collected, provide insight into the development of the profession of American literary scholarship in the 1920s and 1930s; demonstrate the major concerns, issues, conflicts, and interests of its practitioners over the following four decades; and record research advancements and contributions to scholarship on the literary figures of most interest to Turner. The Turner Papers also document the development of high school, collegiate, and graduate level instruction in American literature through the organizational records and course materials, the latter of which include Turner's personal writings and research notes, subject files he collected, clippings, lecture notes, and other printed materials on various authors or genres of American literature. Finally, this collection provides glimpses into Turner's personal career and scholarly thought through the writings which are included, both those he presented orally as speeches or lectures, or those he published as articles or books. The Turner Papers are organized into five series: Correspondence, Course Materials, Organizations, Printed Material, and Writings and Speeches.

A student of the first generation of American literature scholars in the 1920s, Turner played an important role in the network of scholarly exchange that was vital to the emergence of the discipline in the decades following. Turner kept in contact with numerous colleagues in colleges and universities across the United States and throughout the world, including many former graduate students who later became influential literary scholars and critics themselves. The Correspondence Series, 1930-1980, documents Turner's role in this network of scholarly exchange. The Individuals Subseries, 1930-1980, includes Turner's most voluminous correspondents: American literature specialists and authors Gay Wilson Allen, John Q. Anderson, Louis Budd, Robert Cantwell, James B. Colvert, Eddie Gay Cone, Benjamin Franklin Fisher, Albert Mordell, Norman Holmes Pearson, William Stafford, and Edmund Wilson. The Publications Subseries, 1934-1979, contains portions of Turner's communications with editors, publishers, and presses primarily regarding article reviews or manuscript evaluations of others' work. This subseries also contains some information concerning Turner's own articles, manuscripts, and various published works. Correspondence, brochures, press releases, reports, and contractual information concerning Turner's speaking engagements or attendance at professional meetings is collected in the Conferences, Speeches, and Lectures Subseries, 1961-1978 (bulk 1961-1964). Miscellaneous materials comprised primarily of letters arranged by subject are assembled in the Other Correspondence Subseries, 1948-1979 and undated This subseries also contains research notes, memos, and printed material. These papers document Turner's visiting professor appointments and awards, as well as his interest in topics such as the Duke University Library, the Huntington Library, George W. Cable primary sources, and international scholars of American Literature.

The Course Materials Series, undated, is comprised of information Turner collected to aid in composing classroom lectures, and other teaching materials. He maintained an extensive set of files on American authors, which can be found in the Lecture Notes, By Author Subseries, undated Most files contain a brief biography of the author and list of his major compositions, but may also include copies of their works, a typescript of Turner's lecture on the author, and related materials such as clippings or Turner's handwritten research notes. Turner also collected files on genres of literature, delineated both by region, such as Louisiana or British literature, or by style, such as Short Stories or Recent Fiction. These can be found in the Lecture Notes, By Subject Subseries, undated The Class Files Subseries, undated, contains Turner's teaching materials including syllabi, quizes, and exams. These files pertain to courses Turner taught (or in a few early instances, took) in subjects including American Literature before the Civil War, Post-Civil War Literature, Hawthorne and Melville, American Humor, and Southern Literature. Specific course numbers and titles have been provided wherever possible.

Arlin Turner was an active leader and participant in many of the organizations associated with his profession and interests, which are chronicled in the Organizations Series, 1929-1979 (bulk 1936-1979). These scholarly groups developed policies, conducted studies, and otherwise governed the profession. Thus, Turner's influential positions in most of these associations render his thorough collection of organizational records both valuable and useful. Folders in this series primarily contain correspondence, minutes, memoranda, reports, and printed matter such as newsletters, brochures, and clippings. Most notable is Turner's work with the Modern Language Association (MLA), whose American Literature Section members are primarily responsible for the spread of American Studies programs across the globe. Turner's records also document his work with the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA), the American Studies Association (ASA), and the Southeastern American Studies Association (SEASA). This series likewise chronicles Turner's leadership roles in the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Turner was also a member of the Committee for American Studies, the advisory group for the Conference Board of Associated Research Councils' (CBC) Committee for International Exchange of Persons (CIEP). The Organizations Series also includes files on the selection of Fulbright Scholars that he collected as a member of that committee. In addition, Turner served as chairman of this committee during the period in which the "Loewenberg controversy" consumed the CIEP's affairs. When Prof. Bert J. Loewenberg was denied a Fulbright Award in 1959 despite the committee's recommendation, its members threatened to resign in protest against allegations that Loewenberg's past political activity was to blame. Thus, significant amounts of correspondence from fellow committee members Ray Billington, John Hope Franklin, Harvey Wish, and Charles Barker regarding the controversy is found in this series.

Arlin Turner accumulated a significant number of clippings, newsletters, pamphlets, reprints, and publications related to American Literature. These are collected in the Printed Material Series, undated Included in this series are materials from the Educational Testing Service (ETS), memorabilia from Turner's time at the University of Hull in England, literary magazines, and miscellaneous clippings primarily regarding Southern writers (especially North Carolina authors), William Faulkner, and the New Critics (a.k.a. The Fugitives).

The Writings and Speeches Series, 1938-1980 and undated (bulk 1964-1977), contains copies of Turner's significant oral presentations and other written work, both published and unpublished, in addition to some writings of other authors he accumulated. Files from Turner's speaking engagements include both correspondence and typed copies of his presentations. This series also contains unidentified speech notes and writings, in addition to a bound typescript with handwritten edits of Turner's Nathaniel Hawthorne: A biography . Writings about Turner, including obituaries, tributes, his curriculum vita and the like, are also found in the Writings and Speeches Series.

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Dorothy Allison papers, 1965-2010 92.5 Linear Feet — 69,375 Items

Dorothy Allison is an author and feminist who has written numerous books and short stories, including Trash (1988), Bastard Out of Carolina (1992), and Cavedweller (1998). The Dorothy Allison Papers include drafts and manuscripts of her writings (including Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, Cavedweller, and other works), personal and professional correspondence, research materials and subject files, her personal journals, and other materials. Includes some photographs, electronic files, and oversize materials. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Dorothy Allison Papers include drafts and manuscripts of her writings (including Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, Cavedweller, and other works). All of Allison's unpublished works are RESTRICTED and require permission from the creator prior to use. Personal and professional correspondence, including exchanges with her publishers and other authors, are held in the chronological and work files. The collection also contains Allison's research materials and subject files, covering topics on feminism, lesbianism, sexuality, pornography, writing, and other related files. Allison's journals, dating from 1985 through the 2000s, consist of both handwritten and electronic formats, with all of the electronic journals printed for the archive. All of Allison's journals are RESTRICTED and require permission from the creator prior to use. Also included are materials from her speaking engagements, workshops, and other professional activities. There are a variety of special formats within the collection, including some photographs, electronic files, audio tapes, video cassettes, DVDs, and oversize posters.

Collection was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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George P. Garrett papers, 1929-2008 (bulk 1960-2000), bulk 1960-2000 268 Linear Feet

George P. Garrett (1929-2008) was a poet, editor, author, and professor of English. The papers of George P. Garrett span the years 1929 to 2000 with the bulk of the material being dated between 1960 and 1990. The papers were initially collected and assembled by author, bibliographer, and publisher Stuart T. Wright. Wright published a number of Garrett's works at his Palaemon Press and also assembled the Stuart Wright Bibliographic Collection of George Garrett (see related materials held by the Rubenstein Library). Additional materials were received by the Library directly from George Garrett. The papers document Garrett's literary career as an author of novels, short stories, poetry, and dramatic works (including filmscripts) and the tremendous influence he had as an English professor and an editor on an entire generation of writers, particularly in the South. Correspondence with numerous authors, publishers, and educators offers much information about the history of 20th-century Southern literature, publishing, and literary education. The collection is divided into the Writings Series (with subseries of Writings by Garrett, Writings Edited by Garrett, Writings by Others, and Proofs); the Correspondence Series (with 5 subseries of alphabetically and chronologically arranged correspondence); the Audiovisual Material Series; and the Miscellaneous Papers Series.

The papers of George P. Garrett span the years 1929 to 2000 with the bulk of the material being dated between 1960 and 1990. The papers were initially collected and assembled by author, bibliographer, and publisher Stuart T. Wright. Wright published a number of Garrett's works at his Palaemon Press and also assembled the Stuart Wright Bibliographic Collection of George Garrett (see related materials held by the Rubenstein Library). Additional materials were received by the Library directly from George Garrett.

The collection primarily documents Garrett's literary career as an author of novels, short stories, poetry, and dramatic works (including filmscripts) and the tremendous influence he had as an English professor and an editor on an entire generation of writers, particularly in the South. Correspondence with numerous authors, publishers, and educators offers much information about the history of 20th-century Southern literature, publishing, and literary education. The collection is divided into the Writings Series (with subseries of Writings by Garrett, Writings Edited by Garrett, Writings by Others, and Proofs); the Correspondence Series (with 5 subseries of alphabetically and chronologically arranged correspondence); the Audiovisual Material Series; and the Miscellaneous Papers Series.

The Alphabetical Correspondence Subseries: Group A contains letters from numerous contemporary American authors, among them Madison Smartt Bell, who wrote regarding the progress of his fiction, his experience with publishers and literary agents, and his interview with Garrett for Paris Review; and Fred Chappell, whose letters provide commentary on his own works The Inkling and Dagon as well as praise for Garrett's Death of the Fox,The Magic Striptease, and Welcome to the Medicine Show. The Writings by Others Subseries contains Bell's interview with Garrett, in which Garrett discusses his writing process, and critical essays by Fred Chappell (including one on Garrett's The Stranger in the Mirror and one on the work of Sylvia Wilkinson). The Proofs Subseries contains a proof of Reynolds Price's Collected Stories, with brief comments by Garrett.

Garrett's own literary career is documented throughout the collection. The Writings by Garrett Subseries contains manuscripts, typescripts, notes, and drafts of his work, some of it bearing notes for revision. The Chronological Correspondence Subseries contains letters in which Garrett wrote about his works in progress and letters from friends and publishers regarding his work. The comments of noted literary figures regarding Garrett's work frequently appear in letters in the Alphabetical Correspondence Subseries: Group A. This series also affords researchers a detailed view of literary criticism and support exchanged between Garrett and the many authors represented in the collection. His negotiations with publishers are best documented in the Alphabetical Correspondence Subseries: Group B. The Audiovisual Material Series contains some recordings of Garrett reading from his own work.

The Audiovisual Material Series, which contains many recordings of Garrett's lectures, classes, and addresses to groups of writers, students, and literary scholars, documents Garrett's teaching style and his ideas on the teaching of writing. Recordings of lectures and readings by many other well-known authors also appear in this series. Garrett's impact on his students and fellow authors is again visible in the Writings by Others Subseries, which consists of numerous manuscripts, typescripts, and drafts (some bearing notes by Garrett) of work sent to Garrett for commentary and revision.

The addition (Acc. 1998-0356) (5500 items, 15 linear feet; dated 1980-1998 [bulk 1995-1997]) further documents the life, career, and writing of the author and educator. It consists of audiotapes of various authors, including Garrett reading their works; a videocassette entitled "The Great Gatsby"; printed materials and writings, including published books, journals, drafts, and bound proofs; a large amount of personal and business correspondence; and manuscripts submitted to Garrett for comment.

The addition (Acc. 1999-0268) (1 item, 0.3 linear feet; dated [ca. 1996]) consists of a photocopied typescript of Garrett's novel The King of Babylon Shall Not Come Against You with handwritten annotations.

The addition (Acc. 1999-0379) (450 items, 0.6 linear feet; dated 1956-1972) is primarily comprised of incoming correspondence, chiefly professional; a number of writings are interfiled with or attached to letters. Also included are miscellaneous printed materials such as brochures and clippings.

The addition (Acc. 2000-0085) (9100 items, dated 1964-1999) further documents Garrett's literary career with additional manuscripts, often parts of or related to The King of Babylon Shall not Come Against You. There are audiotapes of readings by Garrett and others, literary correspondence, and clippings.

The addition (Acc. 2000-0303) (15 items, 1 linear foot; dated 1995-2000) documents some of Garrett's writing process and his direct comments in readings and on videotape. Included are page proofs and a revised typescript of The King of Babylon Shall Not Come Against You, a revised typescript of Entered From the Sun, 11 cassette tapes of readings and lectures presumably by Garrett, and a videotape entitled "Writers - East of the Blue Ridge" on which he is interviewed.

The addition (Acc. 2002-0034) (1 item, 1 lin. ft.; dated 2002) comprises an uncorrected page proof, with color cover, for Garrett's Going to See the Elephant: Pieces of a Writing Life. This accession is unprocessed and has been interfiled.

Additions (Acc. 2005-0067) (1875 items, 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1990s-2003) and (Acc. 2004-0133) (2 items, 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 2004) comprise manuscripts, drafts, notes, typescripts, and correspondence for Double Vision, The Year in Fiction, and Every Bitter Thing. Also includes typescripts, notes, holograph manuscripts, and typescripts with holograph corrections for essays, stories, and other writings; and a broadside of Garrett's poem, Luck's Shinning Child, printed for the 2004 Virginia Festival of the Book.

The addition (Acc. 2006-0090) (750 items, 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2005-2006) contains proofs for Bad Man Blues and The King of Babylon Shall not Come Against You.; manuscripts for Godfather and several short stories; print materials including books and journals authored or edited by Garrett; 2 DVDs; and 12 computer diskettes. The content of these diskettes has been migrated to archival storage server. Closed pending processing.

The addition (Acc. 2007-0075)(5,400 items; 7.2 lin. ft.; dated 1971-2006) primarily contains drafts of Garrett's writings as typescripts and electronic files on diskettes. Also included are books and journals that feature his works and works of other authors; audiocassettes and CDs of interviews and readings by Garrett; and correspondence. Closed pending processing.

The addition (Acc. 2008-0181) (760 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2008) contains notes, research, and drafts of Garrett's short story "The Source", eventually renamed "Thanksgiving". There are also some folders of correspondence, transcripts of interviews, and some audiovisual material including four audiocassette tapes and one DVD.

The addition (Acc. 2008-0271) (375 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1985-2008) contains correspondence; drafts and notes for poems and other projects, including an "Armies of Occupation" project; and copies of newspaper clippings and interviews with Garrett.

Addition (Acc. 2013-0168) (50 items, 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 1964-1972) comprises a file of letters to Garrett from those whose last names begin with the letter "P."

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Jody Jones Hunter Collection of Works by Anne Tyler, 1958-1998 3.6 Linear Feet — 82 Items

The collection consists primarily of first editions, limited editions, translations, and other editions (many of them autographed or inscribed, 1965-1998) of the works of Anne Tyler, delineating her prolific career. Also includes books about or containing contributions by Tyler (1958-1993); issues of periodicals containing her contributions or reviews of her work (1965-1996); and three pieces of her original correspondence (1979-1989).

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Jody Jones Hunter Collection of Works by Reynolds Price, 1954-2001 21.7 Linear Feet — 550 Items

This collection documents Price's career as a prolific and versatile author. Items include his works of fiction, books containing his contributions, books containing printed encomia, books entirely about Price, books and periodicals containing interviews with and/or articles about Price, books and periodicals formerly owned by Price, audio and video recordings, typescripts, letters, postcards, self-portraits, and photographs.

The addition (2001-0057) (90 items, 1.7 linear feet; dated 1955-2001) consists largely of books and printed material either written by or containing reference to or contributions from Price. Also includes his professional and personal correspondence, 1962-1990; a printer's proof, with editing marks, of Clear Pictures: First Loves, First Guides (1989); the original typescript of his senior honors thesis on John Milton (1955); and five self-portraits in various media.

Addition (2008-0082) (3 items, 2 lin. ft.; dated 1998 and undated) comprises one poster and two black-and-white photographs of Price. One photograph features Price and William Styron.

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Jody Jones Hunter Collection of Works by William Styron, 1831-2001 19.5 Linear Feet — 645 Items

The Jody Jones Hunter Collection of Works by William Styron includes first editions, limited editions, translations, and other editions, many of them autographed or inscribed, of the works of William Styron, along with published articles, correspondence, manuscripts, and related materials. The correspondence is chiefly letters written by Styron to Stuart Wright, the owner of Palaemon Press in Winston-Salem, N.C. and publisher of several limited editions of Styron's work. Also included with the collection is a carbon typescript of Confessions of Nat Turner, with holograph notes, and the original typescript of Styron's recipe for southern fried chicken from The Artist's and Writer's Cookbook (1961).

The addition (Accession 2001-0056) consists largely of books (mostly first editions, some signed or inscribed) and printed material written by or about Styron, or containing his contributions (1951-2001). Also includes editions of All the Finest Girls (2001), by Alexandra Styron (his youngest daughter); an original manuscript review of Sophie's Choice (1979) by Julian Symons; an original publisher's advertisement for The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967); an uncorrected proof of Admiral Robert Penn Warren and the Snows of Winter: A Tribute (1978?); and an original holograph manuscript of Styron's 1977 review of Philip Caputo's A Rumor of War (1977).

Addition (08-081)(5 items, .1 lin. ft.; undated) comprises a signed black-and-white photograph, and four pages of Styron's writing (two sheets are signed).

Addition (08-325)(4 items, .3 lin. ft.; dated 1982-1995 and undated) comprises two items of correspondence, a signed photograph, and an undated screenplay, SET THIS HOUSE ON FIRE.

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Reynolds Price papers, 1880-2014 and undated 151 Linear Feet — 1 Gigabyte — 1,300 document (MS Word and text formats) and digital image files; approximately 1 gigabytes. — 354 boxes

Reynolds Price (1933-2011) was a novelist, short story writer, poet, dramatist, essayist, translator, and James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University, where he taught creative writing and literature beginning in 1958. He was an alumnus of Duke and of Oxford University, which he attended on a Rhodes Scholarship. He received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and his books were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. The collection is comprised of correspondence, writings, serials, clippings, speeches, interviews, legal and financial papers, photographs, audiovisual materials, and digital materials reflecting Price's career and personal life. Personal and professional correspondence document his education at Duke University, especially his studies under William Blackburn; his period abroad as a Rhodes Scholar at Merton College, Oxford; and his literary work and interaction with other authors, including Stephen Spender, Eudora Welty, and Allan Gurganus. Writings include manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, outlines, and notes produced in the creation and publication of all his major works, including: A Long and Happy Life; Kate Vaiden; A Palpable God; Clear Pictures; A Whole New Life; The Collected Stories; The Collected Poems; A Letter to a Godchild; Ardent Spirits; The Good Priest's Son, and many other books, individual stories, poems, and essays.

The (1) Correspondence Series is divided into the Correspondence, chronological subseries and the Correspondence, alphabetical by name subseries. The chronological correspondence subseries consists of letters to and from family, friends, teachers, and admirers of Price's work. The alphabetical correspondence subseries comprises correspondence between Price and other writers, literary figures, celebrities, and close friends including Eudora Welty and Stephen Spender. The (2) Writings Series contains various writings by Price and is divided into the Books, Scribner's Files, Uncollected Fiction and Nonfiction, Price Writing in Serials, Reviews by Price, Addresses and Speeches, and Audiovisual Recordings of Price Regarding Writing subseries. The Books subseries is composed chiefly of drafts, typescripts, and proofs of Price's novels, plays, autobiographical works, and volumes of poetry.

The (3) Events Series contains materials documenting Price's achievements, his education, and performances of his dramatic work and his speaking engagements, as well as performances, and presentations of interest to Price. The (4) Personal Papers Series has expanded significantly following the author's death. The Series contains many of the books, letters, art and photographs kept in his home, including personal health and financial records. The Series also includes personal scrapbooks, his postcard collection, and a collection of family home movies. Price's teaching career in the Duke University English Department is documented by the (5) Duke University Series. And manuscripts sent to Price by fellow authors and students make up the (6) Writings by Others Series.

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Richard Bausch papers, 1965-1998 and undated 13.5 Linear Feet — 1600 Items

The Richard Bausch Papers, 1965-1998, document the career of the American novelist and short story writer through personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts of published and unpublished works, and printed materials. The Correspondence Series begins in the 1960s with mainly personal letters, but by the 1970s begins to document Bausch's emergent writing career, including mention of his work on early short stories and his acceptance to the Iowa Writers' Workshop. From that point on several prominent American writers and literary figures appear, including frequent correspondence at various times with Charles Baxter, Frederick Busch, Richard Ford, George Garrett, Gordon Lish, William Maxwell, and C.K. Williams; Bausch's agent, Harriet Wasserman; and his twin brother, novelist Robert Bausch. Prominent though less frequent correspondents include Fred Chappell, Alan Gurganus, Barry Hannah, and Jean Thompson. The Writings Series documents the development of Bausch's novels and story collections and consists mainly of typescripts and various stages of proofs. Although most are fair copies or only moderately hand-corrected, the sheer number of versions documents the process of creation. Of special note in this regard are the novels Rebel Powers and Violence. Two smaller series, Printed Materials and Writings by Others, make up the remainder of the collection. Highlights of the latter series include a copy of Bob Balaban's screenplay for the Bausch novel, The Last Good Time, and typescripts of several early stories by Gurganus dating from the 1970s.