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Edith Ella Baldwin papers, 1848-1920 4.1 Linear Feet — 39 Items

Artist, craftswoman, and author from Worcester, Massachusetts. Collection consists of 39 unpublished volumes of stories, novels, poetry, lecture notes, and family history from Edith Ella Baldwin, including a novel about sex education for women, diary excerpts describing her visits with painter Mary Cassatt, and typescript copies of letters from her aunt, Ellen Frances Baldwin, dating from 1848 to 1854. Edith Baldwin's writings tend to cover timeless themes of religion and love, although some compositions include contemporary issues such as automobiles, labor strikes, and women's rights. Each volume is arts-and-crafts style construction with typed texts, frequently annotated by hand.

The collection and its volumes represent over 20 years of work by Edith Ella Baldwin. There is no indication that any of her writings were published, although rejection letters included in one of the volumes suggests that she did attempt to become published at one point.

Each volume consists of typescript or carbon copy pages, sewn into cloth boards with dyed red cloth covers stamped with gold lettering; two volumes are burlap and one is corduroy. Some of the volumes' bindings are loose or separated from their covers. The texts have been copy-edited with corrections throughout, along with several re-titled in pencil. Most volumes' title pages include notes explaining whether the work is a fragment, unfinished, or complete; how they "must not be changed"; and how many are "the only copy in existence." Several stories also include Baldwin's handwritten introduction, summarizing the action or presenting the theme.

Many of the stories explore love and religion, but several are noteworthy for their contemporary subjects. "The Automobile" is a short story written in 1907 following two women as they tour New England in their Pope Hartford automobile. "Antony the Foreigner," an unpublished 1912 novel, concerns anarchists, labor strikes, worker unrest, and the suspicion of foreigners. The most notable text is the 1911 "Affairs at Farslope," a 140-page novella about a women's refuge for troubled young girls and how proper sex education could have prevented their misfortune.

Along with Baldwin's fiction and poetry, the collection includes lecture notes from several courses she took on bookbinding, cooking, nursing, and art. There are also her efforts at preserving her family's history, including a copy of her aunt's diary, dated 1848-1854; several of her grandfather's sermons; a volume of stories and poems by her younger sister, who died at age 11; and selected excerpts of her own journal kept while studying art in Paris from 1889-1892.

The materials have been arranged by genre, with the Fiction and Poetry Series making up the bulk of the collection; the Non-Fiction Series consisting largely of lecture notes and diary entries; and the Family History Series, which includes her aunt's diary, other family writings, and sermons. Within each series, materials have been arranged chronologically.

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Kentucky Foundation for Women records, 1985-2017 62.0 Linear Feet — 168 Gigabytes

Sallie Bingham was the founder and first Executive Director of the Kentucky Foundation for Women and profoundly shaped its goals. The overall purpose of the Foundation is to support feminist women in the arts. The collection includes materials about grassroots feminist activism, philanthropy, not-for-profit organizations and artistic patronage, feminist art, and women's culture. Additionally, the collection includes grant applications and files, files for the publication, The American Voice, and information on the Hopscotch House and Wolf Pen Writers Colony, among other materials.

The Kentucky Foundation for Women Records span the dates 1985-2017. The collection provides a rich source of information about grassroots feminist activism, philanthropy, not-for-profit organizations and artistic patronage, feminist art and women's culture. The records of the Foundation include a range of materials, primarily a large number of grant files, including applications and supporting materials of those awarded grants. Also notable are the files for its publication, The American Voice, which include correspondence, copy-edited drafts of poetry and other writings, business records, other publications, miscellaneous ephemera, broadsides, and books of poetry. In addition, there is information on the Hopscotch House and Wolf Pen Writers Colony, miscellaneous correspondence, subject files, annual reports, newsletters, and brochures. The records consist primarily of files, but videocassettes, audiocassettes, and compact disks are also included. The collection is divided into four series: Administrative Files, Project Files, American Voice Files, and Grant Files.

The Administrative Files Series contains Foundation newsletters; administrative correspondence; minutes of Board of Directors meetings; and financial, legal and tax papers. The Project Files Series contains papers on short-term special projects, as well as long-term projects such as the Hopscotch House and the Wolf Pen Women Writers Colony. The American Voice Files Series contains information regarding the publication of the feminist literary journal The American Voice. The series contains correspondence between the editors ( Frederick Smock and Sallie Bingham) and contributors; copy-edited drafts of poetry, prose, and non-fiction essays; business records; broadsides; chapbooks (i.e. hand-bound books); miscellaneous publications; and a partially complete run of the journal. Some of the better-known authors to be published in The American Voice include: Paula Gunn Allen, Isabel Allende, Wendell Berry, Jorge Louis Borges, Kay Boyle, Jo Carson, Andrea Dworkin, Elaine Equi, Doris Grumbach, Joy Harjo, Fenton Johnson, Robin Morgan, Marge Piercy, Reynolds Price, Joyce Carol Oates, and Anne Firor Scott.

Finally, the largest series, the Grant Files Series, contains documentation on the evolution of the Foundation's grant program over the years, as well as files on those projects that received grant monies from the Foundation from 1986 to 1993. The Foundation awarded grants to both men and women, though women are in the majority. The grants supported the work of visual artists, writers, scholars, musicians, composers, documentary and fiction filmmakers, playwrights, painters, sculptors, puppeteers, quilters and other fabric artists, political activists, advocates for physically handicapped women, and those concerned with women and religion and women's employment issues. A unique concern of the grant givers was supporting the exploration and improvement of the situation of women in Appalachia, encouraging women to explore and study the wilderness, and defining and encouraging the emerging field of Ecofeminism.

The addition (Accession 2001-0012) (2208 items, 3.8 lin. ft.; dated 1986-1999) continues to document the process of publishing The American Voice. Materials include correspondence, board minutes, grant applications and evaluations, financial statements, video (3) and audio (4) cassettes and one audio compact disc, and information files for volumes 32-49. Also included are writings by Sallie Bingham. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The addition (Accession 2007-0126) (5 lin. ft.) consists primarily of files documenting the organization's grant program, and also includes project files, files related to the feminist literary journal The American Voice, publications, and files from Hopscotch House.

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Feminist and author. The Sallie Bingham Papers provide rich documentation of the personal life, literary development, and philanthropic activities of Sallie Bingham, feminist and writer. The papers, dated 1900-2011, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1940s to 2011, are comprised of correspondence, speeches, writings, subject files, personal papers, diaries and notebooks, legal and financial papers, audiovisual recordings, and photographic media. Included also are some records of The Kentucky Foundation for Women, a philanthropic organization founded by Bingham; The American Voice, a literary journal founded by Bingham and published under the auspices of The Kentucky Foundation for Women; and Santa Fe Stages, a regional theater founded by Bingham. Arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Correspondence, Diaries and Notebooks, Kentucky Foundation for Women, Legal and Financial, Miscellaneous, Photographs, Poetry, Santa Fe Stages, Speeches, Subject Files, Writings, and Oversize Material, with the Writings, Diaries and Notebooks, and Correspondence Series composing the bulk of the collection. Multiple additions have been added since the collection was processed; these are represented at the end of this finding aid.

The Sallie Bingham Papers provide rich documentation of the personal life, literary development, and philanthropic activities of Sallie Bingham, feminist and writer. The papers, dated 1900-2011, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1940s to 2011, are comprised of correspondence, speeches, writings, subject files, personal papers, diaries and notebooks, legal and financial papers, audiovisual recordings, and photographic media. Included also are some records of The Kentucky Foundation for Women, a philanthropic organization founded by Bingham; The American Voice, a literary journal founded by Bingham and published under the auspices of The Kentucky Foundation for Women; and Santa Fe Stages, a regional theater founded by Bingham. Arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Correspondence, Diaries and Notebooks, Kentucky Foundation for Women, Legal and Financial, Miscellaneous, Photographs, Poetry, Santa Fe Stages, Speeches, Subject Files, Writings, and Oversize Material, with the Writings, Diaries and Notebooks, and Correspondence Series composing the bulk of the collection.

The Writings Series is central to the collection, and is correspondingly substantial, comprising over half of the papers. It includes drafts, research, correspondence and publicity related to such novels as Small Victories, Upstate, Matron of Honor, and Straight Man, her memoir Passion and Prejudice, the writing and production of the plays The Awakening and The Death of Henry Flagler as well as poetry and many short, personal essays. The Poetry Series consists of individual poems, while compendiums of poetry are in the Writings Series. Many of Bingham's writings (including poems, novels, short stories, plays and essays) exist as electronic files and are available to researchers. These files are listed in the Poetry and the Writings Series. The Diaries and Notebooks Series contains material spanning her entire life -- from her adolescence in Louisville, Kentucky in the 1940s to her experiences living in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and contain many ideas for writings and references to the process of writing. The Correspondence Series also spans the same period of time, and contains family correspondence spanning many decades, as well as literary and personal correspondence between Bingham and such well-known authors, activists and artists as Judy Chicago and Gloria Steinem. The smaller Speeches Series houses writings by Bingham for public engagements, and in addition to contributing to a portrait of Bingham as a writer, documents her explication of feminist issues relating to women in the corporate world, in publishing, and women in history.

Bingham, born into a prominent Louisville, Ky. family that owned The Louisville Courier-Journal, worked for the newspaper as book page editor, 1982-1985. She also took an active seat on the board of the Bingham Enterprises, which was responsible for The Courier-Journal and other media corporations in the Louisville area. Bingham's desire to sell her shares in the stock in the newspaper resulted in the sale of The Courier-Journal in 1986. The Bingham family and the break-up of the Bingham Enterprises were the subject of at least four books ( The Binghams of Louisville, House of Dreams, The Patriarch and Bingham's Passion and Prejudice) and much media attention. Materials concerning this aspect of Bingham's life can be found in the Legal and Financial Papers Series and Subject Files Series. Audiovisual materials in the Audiotapes and Videotapes Series document aspects of Bingham's career and life through interviews and other events.

NOTE: This collection also contains numerous additions that have not been processed. For descriptions of later additions, please see below or consult the library's online catalog.

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Scholar and a professor of American literature at Georgia State University. Her first book was The Lonely Hunter: A Biography of Carson McCullers. Correspondence, notes, drafts, clippings, and other materials used by Carr in writing The Lonely Hunter (1975), a biography of Southern author Carson McCullers. Includes correspondence between Carr and McCullers' friends and relatives and literary and artistic figures, notes from interviews, McCullers family correspondence, genealogy, and drafts of Carr's doctoral dissertation on McCullers as well as drafts and foundry proofs for The Lonely Hunter. Includes material on Yaddo, Saratoga Springs, N.Y., February House, Brooklyn Heights, N.Y., and Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, Middlebury, Vt. Persons represented in the collection include Elizabeth Ames, W. H. Auden, Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, John Ciardi, David Leo Diamond, Granville Hicks, John Huston, Jordan Massee, Louis Untermeyer, Eudora Welty, Tennessee Williams, Leo Lerman, and Eleanor Clarke Warren.

The Virginia Spencer Carr Papers span the years 1867 to 2009 and document the research and production of Carr's biography of Carson McCullers, The Lonely Hunter. Formats include correspondence, notes, drafts, and clippings. The collection consists of four series: Alphabetical Files, Research Files, Correspondence by McCullers Family, and Drafts and Proofs. The Alphabetical Files Series consists primarily of correspondence and interview notes between Carr and the many individuals she contacted while doing research for her book. Prominent correspondents include David Leo Diamond, Jordan Massee, Edwin Peacock, Mary Mercer, Mary S. Tucker, and Doubleday Publishing. Materials in the Research Files Series also include a large number of copies of correspondence, primarily letters written by Carson McCullers. There are also some clippings, notes from interviews that Carr conducted and letters she received in reaction to the publication of her book. The Correspondence by McCullers Family Series consists of copies of letters written primarily by Carson McCullers to her friends and family, including Reeves McCullers, David Leo Diamond, and her mother, Marguerite Waters Smith. There is also a series of letters McCullers wrote John Huston in the last year of her life. Finally, the Drafts and Proofs Series includes a copy of Carr's doctoral dissertation on Carson McCullers and notes that served in its preparation. There are also edited sections of the manuscript of the The Lonely Hunter, as well as a foundry proof and a galley of the same.