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In the mid nineteenth century, publishers printed the lyrics to popular songs, without their tunes, on small sheets called song sheets, handbills, or broadsides. These sheets were often illustrated with a woodcut scene or portrait and sold at gathering places where people sang together. Duke's collection of American song sheets includes 1,982 of these ephemeral productions, from "The Star Spangled Banner" to "Pop Goes the Weasel," forming a rich source for research on American society and culture. The American South and the Civil War era are especially well documented, including well over one hundred Confederate broadsides. The collection also includes carrier's addresses, non-musical poetry, and other ephemeral verse. Publishers represented in the collection include: J. Andrews, A. W. Auner, Bell and Company, James D. Gray, Johnson and Company, Charles Magnus, H. de Marsan, T. M. Scroggy, St. Clair Smith, John T. Thorne, H. J. Wehman, J. Wrigley, and others.

Duke's collection of American song sheets includes around 1,982 of these ephemeral productions, from The Star Spangled Banner to Pop Goes the Weasel, forming a rich source for research on American society and culture. The American South and the Civil War era are especially well documented, including well over one hundred Confederate broadsides. The collection also includes carrier's addresses, non-musical poetry, and other ephemeral verse. Publishers represented in the collection include: J. Andrews, A. W. Auner, Bell and Company, James D. Gray, Johnson and Company, Charles Magnus, H. de Marsan, T. M. Scroggy, St. Clair Smith, John T. Thorne, H. J. Wehman, J. Wrigley, and others.

Note that some song sheets are housed in the Confederate Pamphlet collection and the Broadsides collection.

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The papers consist of correspondence from Jay B. Hubbell and John Olin Eidson. The Eidson letters (5 items) discuss the upcoming program of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association of America and suggest Richard Armour as the featured speaker. The letters are arranged chronologically.

Accession (1992-0127) (20,000 items, 30.0 lin. ft.) includes correspondence, research and teaching notes, writings, student offprints, card files, photostats, materials relating to the Center for Editions of American Authors, files relating to American Literature, printed matter, clippings, and other miscellaneous items. Correspondence includes letters from Jay B. Hubbell and John O. Eidson; the latter concern the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association.

Accession (2002-0104), dated 1858-2000 (1251 items; 6.8 linear feet) primarily comprises materials related to writings by Cady and his former student Thomas F. O'Donnell regarding author, editor, and critic William Dean (W.D.) Howells. In 2000, Cady edited and wrote an introduction to a volume of Howells' poetry entitled Pebbles, Monochromes, and Other Modern Poems, 1891-1916, and his collection holds various drafts of this work as well as correspondence between Cady and his publishers concerning the book's publication. Also included is material written by or collected by Cady or O'Donnell while editing or writing other books and articles regarding Howells' poetry; and original correspondence from Howells to his publishers.

Accession (2010-0083) (300 items; 7.5 lin. ft.) includes books by and about William Dean Howells, most with annotations by Edwin Cady and Harry H. Clark, as well as materials (first proofs, drafts, and other Howells publications) that were used by Cady in the preparation of Howells' complete works. Books date from approximately 1881-1981; manuscript materials date from approximately 1879-1992.