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The International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) is a non-profit organization that assists post-conflict, conflict, and democratic countries in pursuing accountability for mass atrocities and human rights abuses. The International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) Records include printed materials and publications, country files, staff files, audiovisual materials, and institutional and administrative materials.

The records of the International Center for Transitional Justice span the years 1918 to 2016, with the bulk of the materials from the late 20th and early 21st century. Gathered by staff at the ICTJ as a resource library, the files house publications from countries all over the world relating to peace processes and to the pursuit of legal reparations and reconciliation in areas of conflict involving human rights violations. Formats include annual reports, legal journals, human rights organization publications, a variety of reports and white papers, conference proceedings, newspapers, trial transcripts, as well as some posters and other ephemera.

There are four main series: Geographic Files, Reference and Reports, Program and Subject Files, and Administrative Files. The Geographic series contains materials from countries directly impacted by the work of ICTJ and its partners. It is arranged by continent and then by country. The Reference and Reports series is ICTJ's documentation library. The Program and Subject files contain thematically-arranged publications about ICTJ's main subject areas, such as transitional justice and reparations, as well as the programatic materials from ICTJ conferences, workshops, publications, truth commissions, and program divisions. The final series, administrative files, is largely comprised of the files of former ICTJ presidents Alex Boraine and Juan Mendez and other staff files. The staff files and the institutional memory files come together to form the narrative of the creation and work of ICTJ since its beginnings in 2001.

Within each series are audiovisual materials and digital files. These materials are inserted into the series they correspond with and cover formats including betamax tapes, mini-DVs, DVDs, CDs, VHS tapes, and cassette tapes. The audiovisual materials include trial recordings, staff interviews, conference recordings, and truth commission proceedings. Some of these were digitized by ICTJ staff. The born-digital records contain similar materials and also include training materials, ICTJ administrative materials, and program specific documents.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Peter Storey papers, 1950-2014 9 Linear Feet — 11.9 Gigabytes — 5000 Items

South African Methodist Church leader and anti-apartheid activist. The Peter Storey Papers contain correspondence, datebooks, articles, lectures, sermons, committee and subject files, clippings, scrapbooks, videotapes, and electronic records. The collection documents Peter Storey's leadership and active involvement in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa, the South African Council of Churches, the Central Methodist Mission in Johannesburg, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Gun Free South Africa, and other religious and anti-apartheid groups. Major subjects include Nelson Mandela, Winnie Mandela, urban ministry, crisis intervention, and political violence and elections in South Africa. Materials range in date from circa 1950 to 2006. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

The Peter Storey Papers contain correspondence, datebooks, articles, lectures, sermons, committee and subject files, clippings, scrapbooks, videotapes, and electronic records. The collection documents Peter Storey's leadership and active involvement in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa, the South African Council of Churches, the Central Methodist Mission in Johannesburg, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Gun Free South Africa, and other religious and anti-apartheid groups. Major subjects include Nelson Mandela, Winnie Mandela, urban ministry, crisis intervention, and political violence and elections in South Africa. Materials range in date from circa 1950 to 2014. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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South Africa Policy Implementation Committee records, 1984-1987 1.4 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,200 Items

The South Africa Policy Implementation Committee was authorized by resolution of the Board of Trustees in 1986 to implement the policies recommended by the Committee on Social Implications of Duke Stock, formed in 1985. Collection contains records relating to the operations and activities of the South Africa Policy Implementation Committee and includes correspondence, memoranda, reports, minutes, printed material, and clippings concerning apartheid and Duke University's decision to divest.

Contains material pertaining to the activities of the South Africa Policy Implementation Committee. The collection contains rosters, minutes, and reports of the Committee as well as correspondence and memoranda concerning Duke's policy toward and financial relationships with corporations with operations in South Africa during apartheid. Correspondence between University President H. Keith H. Brodie and representatives of corporations such as International Business Machines, Mcgraw-Hill, Inc., Texaco, Inc., American Express Company, R.J. Reynolds/Nabisco, Inc., and Cocoa-Cola Company documents corporate reaction to Duke's decision to divest. Memoranda, minutes, reports, and rosters of the Committee on Social Implications of Duke Stock are also present.

Throughout the collection are clippings and other printed material addressing social, political, and economic conditions in South Africa, policies adopted by other universities and colleges toward South Africa, and reports and studies relating to the feasibility, appropriateness, and potential consequences of divestment.