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The Falcon Lair residence was purchased by Doris Duke in April, 1953 primarily for use on her occasional visits to California and for use while she was in transit to or from her residence in Honolulu. Compared to her other estates, the residence was not large, however, being located in the hills above Benedict Canyon overlooking Beverly Hills, it served as a retreat from public life. Soon after the home was purchased, Doris Duke hired Tony Duquette to supervise the entire redecoration and remodeling of Falcon Lair. The home was renovated again in the mid-1970s. Miss Duke lived at Falcon Lair until her death in 1993, and in 1998 the property was sold by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is arranged into two series: Administrative Records and Architectural Records. It spans the years 1937 to 1999, beginning with the purchase and interior renovation of the home and ending with maintenance and general upkeep of the home after Doris Duke's death in 1993. The collection primarily documents the expenses and daily operations of renovating, running, and maintaining the Falcon Lair residence, and includes invoices and receipts for services and repairs, correspondence, memoranda, and telegrams relating to routine matters of the residence, expenses, and photo inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items. A majority of the architectural records detail alterations and additions to the Falcon Lair residence.

The Doris Duke papers on the Falcon Lair residence (formerly FL.5) are part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is arranged into two series: Administrative Records and Architectural Records. It spans the years 1937 to 1999, beginning with the purchase and interior renovation of the home and ending with maintenance and general upkeep of the home after Doris Duke's death in 1993. The collection primarily documents the expenses and daily operations of renovating, running, and maintaining the Falcon Lair residence, and includes invoices and receipts for services and repairs, correspondence, memoranda, and telegrams relating to routine matters of the residence, expenses, and photo inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items. A majority of the architectural records detail alterations and additions to the Falcon Lair residence. The materials in this collection are arranged in chronological order and alphabetically there under.

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Doris Duke papers on the Rough Point residence, 1922-1997 7.8 Linear Feet — approximately 2,400 Items

Rough Point was purchased by James B. Duke in 1922. When Duke passed away in 1925, he left the home to his 12-year-old daughter Doris, subject to Mrs. (Nanaline) Duke's life interest. Although Nanaline Duke continued to spend her summers at Rough Point, in the early 1950s she took up permanent residence in New York City and emptied Rough Point of all its furnishings. It was around this time that Doris Duke once again became a frequent visitor to Newport and turned her attention to renovating and refurnishing the family estate. Upon her death in 1993, Miss Duke bequeathed the estate to the Newport Restoration Foundation with the directive that it be opened to the public as a museum. The collection primarily documents the expenses and daily operations of running, renovating, and maintaining the Rough Point estate, and includes invoices and receipts for repairs and renovations to the residence, correspondence and memoranda relating to routine matters of the residence, expenses, inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items, and several appraisals of the residence and its household effects. A majority of the architectural records detail alterations and additions to the Rough Point residence as designed by the Horace Trumbauer firm.

The Doris Duke Papers on the Rough Point Residence (formerly RP.4) are part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is arranged into two series: Administrative Records and Architectural Records. It spans the years 1922 to 1997, beginning with invoices and vouchers of furnishings, paintings, and rugs purchased for Rough Point by James Buchanan (J.B.) and Nanaline Duke, and ending with maintenance and general upkeep of the estate after Doris Duke's death in 1993. The collection primarily documents the expenses and daily operations of running, renovating, and maintaining the Rough Point estate, and includes invoices and receipts for repairs and renovations to the residence, correspondence and memoranda relating to routine matters of the residence, expenses, inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items, and several appraisals of the residence and its household effects. A majority of the architectural records detail alterations and additions to the Rough Point residence as designed by the Horace Trumbauer firm. The materials in this collection are arranged loosely in chronological order.

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Doris Duke papers on the Shangri La residence, 1932-2003 16.8 Linear Feet — approx. 10,680 Items

Traveling through many Muslim countries and parts of India during her honeymoon, Doris Duke was fascinated by Islamic cultural traditions, art and architecture. A visit to the Taj Mahal inspired Duke to eventually commission plans for the house she built in Hawaii. Duke engaged the architectural firm of Wyeth and King to design her Hawaiian home, and architects Marion Sims Wyeth and H. Drewry Baker worked closely with Duke to design the home, with Duke providing sketches and photographs of buildings and architectural details she had seen during her travels. Throughout her life, Doris Duke enthusiastically designed and redesigned her home and gardens, and in 1965 made a codicil in her will directing her executors to organize a foundation to manage and maintain Shangri La for the study and understanding of Middle Eastern art and culture. The collection tells the story of Shangri La, the most intimate of Doris Duke's residences. While the collection spans the years 1932 to 2003, the materials primarily begin in 1936, with correspondence relating to early discussions of architects to design Shangri La in what was then the U.S. Territory of Hawaii, and end in the mid to late 1990s with materials related to the handling of the Estate of Doris Duke after her death in 1993. The materials primarily detail the design, construction, decoration, and furnishing of Shangri La and the routine business matters of its daily operation.

The Doris Duke papers on the Shangri La residence (formerly SL.2 and SL.2.8) are part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection tells the story of Shangri La, the most intimate of Doris Duke's residences. While the collection spans the years 1932 to 2003, the materials primarily begin in 1936, with correspondence relating to early discussions of architects to design Shangri La in what was then the U.S. Territory of Hawaii, and end in the mid to late 1990s with materials related to the handling of the Estate of Doris Duke after her death in 1993. The collection is arranged into three series: Correspondence, Administrative Records, and Architectural Records. Nearly half of the correspondence specifically pertains to the design, construction, decoration, and furnishing of Shangri La. The remaining materials in the series detail the activities of Shangri La and include correspondence and memoranda documenting the routine business matters of its daily operation. The materials included in the Administrative Records series primarily document the expenses and daily operations of running and maintaining the Hawaiian residence. Included in this series are invoices and receipts for repairs and renovations to the residence, expenses and expenditures, and inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items. Also included in this series are weekly security reports, location diaries of Doris Duke's whereabouts, and recipes for a variety of meals that were presumably prepared at Shangri La. A majority of the architectural records in this collection are related to the design and construction of Shangri La. The materials in this collection are arranged loosely in chronological order.

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Duke Family New York Apartments collection, 1908-1997 2.6 Linear Feet — approx. 1,200 Items

J.B. Duke acquired a lot on the northeast corner of Fifth Avenue and 78th Street and commissioned Horace Trumbauer to draw the plans for a new residence in 1909. It was in this mansion that his daughter Doris was born and raised. After J.B.'s death in 1925, Nanaline continued to live in the mansion until January, 1958 when she and Doris donated the house to New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. Throughout her adulthood Doris continued to live in New York City, residing in a penthouse located at 3 E. 84th Street and a penthouse at 475 Park Avenue, which was her last New York City residence when she died in 1993. The collection primarily documents the expenses and daily operations of running and maintaining three large residences in New York City. Materials include invoices and receipts for repairs and renovations to the residences, correspondence and memoranda relating to routine matters of the residences including expenses, inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items, and appraisals of the residences and their household effects. A majority of the architectural records in this collection are related to the design and construction of J.B. Duke's mansion at 1 E. 78th Street.

The Duke Family New York Apartments Collection (formerly NYM, NYA84, and NYA) is part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. This collection consists of three record groups that were intentionally assembled due to the similarity of the subject. The collection spans the years 1908 to 1997, beginning with the design and construction of James B. Duke's mansion at 1 E. 78th Street and ending with the maintenance and general upkeep of Doris Duke's 475 Park Avenue apartment after her death. The collection is arranged in three series by purchase date: New York Mansion (1 E. 78th Street), New York Apartment (3 E. 84th Street, Penthouse), and New York Apartment (475 Park Avenue, Penthouse B). Each of the series has an Administrative Records sub series; however the New York Mansion and 475 Park Avenue Penthouse both have an Architectural Records sub series. The collection primarily documents the expenses and daily operations of running and maintaining three large residences in New York City. Administrative records for all three series generally include invoices and receipts for repairs and renovations to the residences, correspondence and memoranda relating to routine matters of the residences including expenses, inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items, and appraisals of the residences and their household effects. A majority of the architectural records in this collection are related to the design and construction of J.B. Duke's mansion at 1 E. 78th Street. The materials in this collection are arranged loosely in chronological order.

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Duke Farms, a 2,700 acre estate located in Hillsborough, New Jersey, was developed by James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke beginning in 1893. After J.B. Duke's death in 1925, Doris Duke inherited the property. Over the course of nearly seven decades she worked to continue the legacy of Duke Farms and introduced environmentally-friendly and innovative farming methods into the operations of Duke Farms and purchased and restored farms and farmstead structures in order to forestall the rapid loss of farmland to urban development. When she died she left the majority of her estate to the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation with her expressed wish that Duke Farms be used to drive positive change on a number of key issues regarding the stewardship of the natural environment. The collection is arranged into four series: Administrative Records, Duke Business Office Records, Duke Farms Main Residence Records, and Architectural Records. It spans the years 1859 to 2004, beginning with the early vision and evolution of the estate by James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, the enhancement and management of the estate by Doris Duke after she inherited control of it upon her father's death, and ending with the general upkeep of the estate after Doris Duke's death in 1993. The collection primarily documents the daily operations of running, renovating, and maintaining the Duke Farms estate, and includes daily activity reports, correspondence, notes, and specifications for various architectural projects at Duke Farms, invoices and vouchers for repairs at different buildings on the estate, cattle inventories and cow registrations, financial ledgers and cashbooks, and security ledgers and reports. The architectural records are further arranged into seven sub series and contain a wide assortment of records, including blueprints, diazo prints, site plans, schedules, and maps. The materials document a variety of design, construction, and farm-related activities at Duke Farms.

The Duke Family papers on the Duke Farms residence (formerly DF.3) is part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is arranged into four series: Administrative Records, Duke Business Office Records, Duke Farms Main Residence Records, and Architectural Records. It spans the years 1859 to 2004, beginning with the early vision and evolution of the estate by James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, the enhancement and management of the estate by Doris Duke after she inherited control of it upon her father's death, and ending with the general upkeep of the estate after Doris Duke's death in 1993. The collection primarily documents the daily operations of running, renovating, and maintaining the Duke Farms estate, and includes deeds, mortgages, and agreements relating to the formation of J.B. Duke's Hillsborough property, daily activity reports, correspondence, notes, and specifications for various architectural projects at Duke Farms, invoices and vouchers for repairs at different buildings on the estate including the Main Residence, cattle inventories and cow registrations, financial ledgers and cashbooks, and security ledgers and reports. The architectural records are further arranged into seven sub series and contain a wide assortment of records, including blueprints, diazo prints, site plans, schedules, and maps. The materials document a variety of design, construction, and farm-related activities at Duke Farms. The arrangement of the collection varies with each series.

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Duke Gardens Foundation records, 1912-2002 and undated 96.8 Linear Feet — 28,000 Items

On October 15, 1958 the Duke Gardens Foundation was incorporated with the purpose of "developing thereon agricultural, botanical & horticultural exhibits for the purpose of scientific experiments and of public inspection, instruction, education & enjoyment." Over the period of six years, Doris Duke was personally involved in the physical design of the Indoor Display Gardens, in which various gardens were carefully designed, planned, and developed from the point of view of authenticity. The gardens were opened to the public in 1964, and included 11 unique gardens for visitors to enjoy. Doris Duke continued her involvement with her gardens throughout her life, bringing designers with her to modify them during the summer season when they were closed to tourists. The Duke Gardens Foundation was officially dissolved November 13, 2001 and the gardens closed to the public in 2008. The collection documents the lifecycle of the Duke Gardens Foundation, beginning with the inception of the Duke Gardens Foundation and the design and creation of the various indoor display gardens that comprised Duke Gardens, including the associated purchases of plants and bulbs. The materials follow the daily operations of Duke Gardens, including modifications and general upkeep of the gardens, visitor and tour information, and operations of the Foundation itself. The materials end with the general management of Duke Gardens after Doris Duke's death in 1993 and the final dissolution of the Foundation in 2001. Materials include correspondence, inventories, specifications for various architectural projects at Duke Gardens, invoices and vouchers for repairs and reconstruction to the greenhouses, surveys and reports, financial ledgers, and a multitude of both black and white and color photographs and slides of the different gardens.

The Duke Gardens Foundation records (formerly DGF.13) is part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is arranged into five series: Administrative Records, Financial Records, Photographs/Slides, Legal Records, and Architectural Records. It primarily spans the years 1912 to 2002, although a bulk of the materials date from 1958 to 1999. The collection documents the lifecycle of the Duke Gardens Foundation, beginning with the inception of the Duke Gardens Foundation and the design and creation of the various indoor display gardens that comprised Duke Gardens, including the associated purchases of plants and bulbs. The materials follow the daily operations of Duke Gardens, including modifications and general upkeep of the gardens, visitor and tour information, and operations of the Foundation itself. The materials end with the general management of Duke Gardens after Doris Duke's death in 1993 and the final dissolution of the Foundation in 2001. Materials include correspondence (including thank you letters from visitors), inventories, specifications for various architectural projects at Duke Gardens, invoices and vouchers for repairs and reconstruction to the greenhouses, surveys and reports, financial ledgers, and a multitude of both black and white and color photographs and slides of the different gardens. The arrangement of the collection varies with each series.

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On a 1957 trip to India and China, Doris Duke stopped in Thailand, and it is likely that the exploration of Bangkok and its art and architecture she saw on that visit inspired her to dream of creating a Thai village in Hawaii with houses similar to those she had seen. In December of 1960, she formally hired François Duhau de Berenx to help bring it to pass. The Thai House Foundation was established on January 30, 1961; the name was changed to the Foundation for Southeast Asian Art and Culture (SEAAC) in June of that same year. The establishment of the Foundation resulted in a project that Doris Duke saw as a gift to Hawaii, and one that occupied her for many years. At least five sites in Hawaii were considered for the Thai Village and it was the choice of an appropriate location that ultimately proved the stumbling block to completion of the project. Although her dream of a Thai Village was never fulfilled, Doris Duke's interest in Asia continued, as she continued purchasing objects right up until her death in 1993. In 2002, a significant portion of the collection was donated to two museums distinguished for their collections of Southeast Asian art; the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco and the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. The collection documents the establishment and management of Doris Duke's Foundation for Southeast Asian Art and Culture (SEAAC). Records in the Administrative series document the purchase and transport of art objects and building parts, Doris Duke's attempts to locate a site for the Thai Village, and the financial records associated with the daily operations and management of the foundation and its assets. The Photograph series consists primarily of black and white images of the art objects and building parts purchased for SEAAC, with some images of houses in Bangkok and other Thai buildings, which served as the inspiration for the Thai Village. The architectural records in this collection include various drawings of the proposed village site and plans for the various buildings that were to be constructed.

The Foundation for Southeast Asian Art and Culture Records (formerly SEAAC.8) are part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection spans the years 1954 to 2002, and is arranged in three series: Administrative Records, Photographs, and Architectural Records. The collection documents the establishment and management of Doris Duke's Foundation for Southeast Asian Art and Culture. Records in the Administrative series reveal a frenzied few years of acquisition, where the curator of SEAAC sought works of art of all types - manuscript cabinets and manuscripts, Thai ceramics, Chinese porcelains, wood, stone, bronze and ivory sculptures, and complete Thai houses. It also documents Doris Duke's attempts to locate a site for the Thai Village, the transport and exhibition of the objects at the Coach Barn at Duke Farms, and the financial records associated with the daily operations and management of the foundation and its assets. The Photograph series consists primarily of black and white images of the art objects and building parts purchased for SEAAC, with some images of houses in Bangkok and other Thai buildings, which served as the inspiration for the Thai Village. The architectural records in this collection include various drawings of the proposed village site and plans for the various buildings that were to be constructed. The materials in this collection are arranged loosely in chronological order.

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In 1968, Doris Duke established the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) with the express purpose of preserving, interpreting, and maintaining landscape and objects reflecting the 18th- and 19th-century architectural culture of Aquidneck Island (Newport, R.I.). In creating the foundation, Doris Duke had a simple plan: to purchase dilapidated 18th century homes and meticulously restore them so that every detail was as historically accurate as possible. During the next three decades, preservation remained a major focus among her many charitable endeavors. Saving eighty-three properties was an undertaking on a scale and scope that has never been repeated. Doris Duke gave $21.9 million to the Newport Restoration Foundation, the largest philanthropic gift she made to a single organization during her lifetime. The collection documents the daily business activities of the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF), including purchases, renovations, and renting of various NRF homes, photo inventories of the furniture and other household items at each restored NRF home, weekly progress reports, and other routine matters. The architectural records in this collection are related to the renovation of several of the NRF homes. The materials in this collection are arranged chronologically and alphabetically thereunder.

The Newport Restoration Foundation Records (formerly NRF.12) are part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection spans the years 1968 to 1999, although a bulk of the material dates from 1968 to 1982. While the collection is arranged into three series: Adminstrative Records, Financial Records, and Architectural Records, the majority of materials are financial records associated with the daily operations and management of the foundation and its assets. Overall, the collection documents the daily business activities of the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF), including purchases, renovations, and renting of various NRF homes, photo inventories of the furniture and other household items at each restored NRF home, weekly progress reports, and other routine matters. The architectural records in this collection are related to the renovation of several of the NRF homes. The materials in this collection are arranged chronologically and alphabetically thereunder.