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Annabel Jane Wharton is the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art and culture. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan and other countries in West Asia. More recent research interests include the effects of modernity on ancient landscapes. Included in the collection are contains diaries kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008.

The Annabel Jane Wharton Papers document the professional life of Annabel Jane Wharton, the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art, architecture, and culture. Later research interests include modern architecture and new technologies for visualizing historical materials. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan, and other proximal countries. The Travel Binders series contains research files created by Wharton on international and domestic trips. They are composed of photographs, negatives, handwritten and typed notes, and ephemera from sites visited. The Diaries series contains appointment books kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008. The diaries track Wharton’s travels, administrative and professorial duties at Duke, and her personal engagements. Included among the appointments and notes are drawings in Wharton’s precise, narrow hand. The Photographs and Negatives series contain black-and-white and color photographs and negatives taken by Wharton. Some of them reflect more research trips, while others are family snapshots. The photographs are arranged by location names provided by Wharton.

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The formal study of art at Duke began with the establishment of the Dept. of Aesthetics, Art, and Music in 1942. The department was renamed the Dept. of Art in the 1959/1960 academic year, and later renamed the Dept. of Art and Art History in 1985/1986. The Department has two distinct units, one primarily devoted to the making of works of art, the other primarily devoted to the historical understanding and current interpretation of visual images and constructed space. Records include clippings, exhibit catalogs, reports, memoranda, and other records. Subjects include the B. N. Duke lectures, the James A. Thomas Memorial Room, and exhibits. Materials range in date from circa 1942 to 1985. English.

Records include clippings, exhibit catalogs, reports, memoranda, and other records. Subjects include the B. N. Duke lectures, the James A. Thomas Memorial Room, and exhibits. Materials range in date from circa 1942 to 1985.

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Sidney D. Markman papers, 1952-1986 1.5 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

In 1947, Dr. Markman began teaching at Duke University as Associate Professor of Art History and Archaeology and was appointed to full professor in 1965. He retired in 1981 and is Professor Emeritus of Art History and Archaeology in 1981. The collection includes four 3-ring binders kept by Professor Markman that include his lecture notes and material for two of his courses: Latin American Art [Colonial Period] and Pre-Columbian Art and Archaeology [Mesoamerica]. There is also a folder that contains correspondence. The collection ranges in date from 1952-1986.

The collection includes four 3-ring binders kept by Professor Markman that include his lecture notes and material for two of his courses: Latin American Art [Colonial Period] and Pre-Columbian Art and Archaeology [Mesoamerica]. There is also a folder that contains correspondence. The collection ranges in date from 1952-1986.