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The Jody Jones Hunter Collection of Works by William Styron includes first editions, limited editions, translations, and other editions, many of them autographed or inscribed, of the works of William Styron, along with published articles, correspondence, manuscripts, and related materials. The correspondence is chiefly letters written by Styron to Stuart Wright, the owner of Palaemon Press in Winston-Salem, N.C. and publisher of several limited editions of Styron's work. Also included with the collection is a carbon typescript of Confessions of Nat Turner, with holograph notes, and the original typescript of Styron's recipe for southern fried chicken from The Artist's and Writer's Cookbook (1961).

The addition (Accession 2001-0056) consists largely of books (mostly first editions, some signed or inscribed) and printed material written by or about Styron, or containing his contributions (1951-2001). Also includes editions of All the Finest Girls (2001), by Alexandra Styron (his youngest daughter); an original manuscript review of Sophie's Choice (1979) by Julian Symons; an original publisher's advertisement for The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967); an uncorrected proof of Admiral Robert Penn Warren and the Snows of Winter: A Tribute (1978?); and an original holograph manuscript of Styron's 1977 review of Philip Caputo's A Rumor of War (1977).

Addition (08-081)(5 items, .1 lin. ft.; undated) comprises a signed black-and-white photograph, and four pages of Styron's writing (two sheets are signed).

Addition (08-325)(4 items, .3 lin. ft.; dated 1982-1995 and undated) comprises two items of correspondence, a signed photograph, and an undated screenplay, SET THIS HOUSE ON FIRE.

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Edith Ella Baldwin papers, 1848-1920 4.1 Linear Feet — 39 Items

Artist, craftswoman, and author from Worcester, Massachusetts. Collection consists of 39 unpublished volumes of stories, novels, poetry, lecture notes, and family history from Edith Ella Baldwin, including a novel about sex education for women, diary excerpts describing her visits with painter Mary Cassatt, and typescript copies of letters from her aunt, Ellen Frances Baldwin, dating from 1848 to 1854. Edith Baldwin's writings tend to cover timeless themes of religion and love, although some compositions include contemporary issues such as automobiles, labor strikes, and women's rights. Each volume is arts-and-crafts style construction with typed texts, frequently annotated by hand.

The collection and its volumes represent over 20 years of work by Edith Ella Baldwin. There is no indication that any of her writings were published, although rejection letters included in one of the volumes suggests that she did attempt to become published at one point.

Each volume consists of typescript or carbon copy pages, sewn into cloth boards with dyed red cloth covers stamped with gold lettering; two volumes are burlap and one is corduroy. Some of the volumes' bindings are loose or separated from their covers. The texts have been copy-edited with corrections throughout, along with several re-titled in pencil. Most volumes' title pages include notes explaining whether the work is a fragment, unfinished, or complete; how they "must not be changed"; and how many are "the only copy in existence." Several stories also include Baldwin's handwritten introduction, summarizing the action or presenting the theme.

Many of the stories explore love and religion, but several are noteworthy for their contemporary subjects. "The Automobile" is a short story written in 1907 following two women as they tour New England in their Pope Hartford automobile. "Antony the Foreigner," an unpublished 1912 novel, concerns anarchists, labor strikes, worker unrest, and the suspicion of foreigners. The most notable text is the 1911 "Affairs at Farslope," a 140-page novella about a women's refuge for troubled young girls and how proper sex education could have prevented their misfortune.

Along with Baldwin's fiction and poetry, the collection includes lecture notes from several courses she took on bookbinding, cooking, nursing, and art. There are also her efforts at preserving her family's history, including a copy of her aunt's diary, dated 1848-1854; several of her grandfather's sermons; a volume of stories and poems by her younger sister, who died at age 11; and selected excerpts of her own journal kept while studying art in Paris from 1889-1892.

The materials have been arranged by genre, with the Fiction and Poetry Series making up the bulk of the collection; the Non-Fiction Series consisting largely of lecture notes and diary entries; and the Family History Series, which includes her aunt's diary, other family writings, and sermons. Within each series, materials have been arranged chronologically.

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William Styron papers, 1855-2019 30.2 Linear Feet — 24,562 items

American author and Duke University alumnus. The William Styron Papers span the years 1855-2019, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1943 and 1996. The collection consists of correspondence; writings by Styron and other authors; printed materials (including serials containing articles by and about Styron and his work as well as newspaper and magazine clippings); audiotapes, videotapes, and photographs; legal and financial papers; speeches and addresses; interviews; scrapbooks; and other material relating to Styron's personal life and his career as a writer. Extensive personal and professional correspondence between his family, friends, and fellow authors provides insight into his education at Duke University (particularly his studies with Professor William Blackburn of the Department of English) as well as his literary career and personal life.

The William Styron Papers span the years 1855-2019 with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1943 and 1996. The collection is arranged into the following series: Correspondence, Writings by Styron (which includes Separate Publications, Contributions to Books and Periodicals, Speeches, Unfinished Work, and Miscellaneous Writings), Writings by Others, Printed Material, Audiovisual Material, Scrapbooks, and Miscellaneous Material. Extensive personal and professional correspondence between Styron and his family, friends, editors, and fellow authors provides insight into his education at Duke University (particularly his studies with Professor William Blackburn of the Department of English) as well as his literary career and personal life. The Writings by Styron Series includes numerous drafts, notes, manuscripts, and proofs of his novels, essays, speeches, and articles. Critical and analytical works concerning Styron's writing can be found in both the Printed Material Series and the Writings by Others Series. Interviews with Styron are to be found in both the Interviews section of the Writings by Others Series and in the Audiovisual Material Series.

Numerous American authors are represented in the collection in the Correspondence Series as well as in the Writings by Others Series. Among the major correspondents are Robert Penn Warren, Carlos Fuentes, Norman Mailer, and Reynolds Price. Letters from Eudora Welty, Truman Capote, Art Buchwald, Richard Wilbur, Kurt Vonnegut, William Kennedy, and James Dickey are also included. A separate index to some of the letters by well-known authors and celebrities accompanies the collection. The Writings by Others Series also includes limited edition copies of poems by Reynolds Price and Allen Tate.

Styron's close relationship with his family is documented in the early letters of the Correspondence Series as well as in the scrapbooks kept by his father. The latter include much juvenilia and childhood memorabilia as well as clippings documenting his early literary accomplishments. A diary kept by Styron during the year following his mother's death appears in the Writings by Styron Series: Miscellaneous Writings Subseries. The Audiovisual Material Series includes several family photographs. Videotapes in this series also provide much information about his life and work.

Among the Writings by Styron are numerous holograph notes, manuscripts written in pencil, and printed texts and typescripts with revisions. These provide detailed insight into Styron's creative process and enable the researcher to document the evolution of much of Styron's work. Research material used by Styron for some of his work, particularly The Confessions of Nat Turner, appears among the volumes in the Printed Material Series.

Styron's experience with having his work filmed for both television and the cinema is documented by screenplays of The Long March and Sophie's Choice. Several photographs of the latter production appear in the Audiovisual Material Series. A screenplay of Set This House on Fire, a first draft of a screenplay of Lie Down in Darkness, and a step outline of The Confessions of Nat Turner, none of which were produced, also appear in the Writings by Others Series

Unprocessed addition (06-105) (0.4 lin. ft) contains Styron's copy of The Confessions of Nat Turner and a binder of letters from Styron to Bertha Krantz, Robert D. Loomis, and others, 1967-1993.

Unprocessed addition (07-145) (6 items, 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 2007) contains copies of material from Styron's memorial service, including the program, book of reminiscences, and transcript. This material is boxed in box 1 of 08-142.

Unprocessed addition (08-012) (0.8 lin. ft.; 600 items; dated 1943-2006 and undated) includes published and unpublished essays, drafts, speeches, and writings by Styron, as well as copies of letters to his father (1943-1952) and correspondence from his wife, Rose, from around the time of his death in 2006. Also includes a leather portfolio with drafts of his work, photographs, clippings, and a photograph album from his daughter's film, Shadrach.

Unprocessed addition (08-072) (180 items, .6 lin. ft.; dated 1990-2003 and undated) comprises mainly letters to Styron regarding his works, especially DARKNESS VISIBLE. Also includes letters regarding appearances requested or planned.

Unprocessed addition (08-142) (388 items, .8 lin. ft; dated 1966-2007 and undated) mainly comprises incoming correspondence, which occasionally contains clippings, photographs, and other incidental materials. In addition, includes original manuscripts for several short works by the author, many annotated, as well as some handwritten manuscript pages for SOPHIE'S CHOICE. There are also two dvds of Styron's memorial service. Box 1 of this material includes Acc. 07-145.

Unprocessed addition (08-294) (0.4 lin. ft.; 300 items) was acquired and donated by James West III, and includes manuscripts, essays, edited drafts, and speeches by Styron. Each manuscript includes a cover page by West describing the condition of the materials. This material is boxed with Acc. 08/012.

Addition (11-142) (0.6 lin. ft.; 500 items) was donated by Styron's editor, Robert Loomis. It includes drafts and clippings, as well as photographs used in Styron publications.

Additions (12-017 and 12-131) (1.2 lin. ft.; 500 items) includes various writings and research.

Addition (13-017) contains original blocks used to create advertisements for William Styron's novel The Confessions of Nat Turner.

Addition (15-030) contains correspondence with Thomas P. Peyton and Peyton's family, 1944-2002.

Addition (16-025) comprises 27 items, mainly letters and notes from Styron to Carl Mahakian. There is also an autographed photograph, and three letters to Mahakian from Jim West, who requests help with his biography of Styron. In addition, there is an invitation to Mahakian to attend Styron's private memorial service and several published obituaries, along with a Spanish translation of Darkness Visible and a Book-of-the-Month Club flyer for The Confessions of Nat Turner. Material is dated 1969-2007.

Addition (19-0014) contains 35mm documentary slides donated by Joel Foreman.

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John Seelye Papers, 1862-2015 and undated, bulk 1955-2007 46.7 Linear Feet — 0.065 Gigabytes

John Seelye was a professor of English and American Literature at the University of California at Berkeley, University of Connecticut, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dartmouth College, and the University of Florida. The papers of John Seelye span the years 1862-2015, with the bulk of the papers dated between 1955 and 2007, covering Seelye's professional career as both an scholar and as an editor of the Penguin Classics series for literature. Although there are files related to his teaching and career as an academic, the emphasis of the collection is on Seelye's work as author and editor. The collection consists of correspondence (sent and received) and contracts; subject files Seelye maintained at each of his institutions and for his research; writings by Seelye, including book reviews, poetry, articles and prose, as well as books, including a copy of the Life of Asa G. Sheldon: Wilmington Farmer (1862); and personal items, which include incoming correspondence intended for Suzanne Everett Throop, who received a large number of love letters from "Marguerite" between 1897 and 1898 and some additional letters from "Harriet" and "Chandler" in the 1920s. Subjects in the papers include Mark Twain, the literary criticism and interpretation of Herman Melville's works and American literature generally, the West in fiction, rivers in the United States, cowboys in popular culture, the history of Plymouth Rock, and the publishing of poetry in the United States.

The papers of John Seelye span the years 1862-2015, with the bulk of the papers dated between 1955 and 2007, covering Seelye's professional career as both an scholar and as an editor of the Penguin Classics series for literature. Although there are files related to his teaching and career as an academic, the emphasis of the collection is on Seelye's work as author and editor. The Correspondence and Contracts Series includes primarily professional correspondence sent (1956-2014) and received (1958-2012 and undated) by Seelye, as well as contracts and supporting documents focusing on Seelye's contact with his publishers. The Academia Series contains subject files Seelye maintained during his professional career while at the University of California at Berkeley (1959-1965), the University of Connecticut (1966-1974), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1974-1984), the University of Florida (1984-2008), and Dartmouth (1982-1992). The Research/Subject Files Series includes materials related to research Seelye carried out to support his writings as well as subject files on people and topics of interest to him or related to other work he carried out. The Writings Series contains drafts, notes, edits, and published versions of Seelye's book reviews, film reviews, poetry, and prose, including his numerous scholarly and fiction essays and articles, books, and edited works. The Personal series contains assorted materials relevant to Seelye's life, including several versions of his curriculum vitae as well as early report cards, photographs and headshots, and school newspapers from his various schools. Also includes a Bible owned by Dwight L. Moody and incoming correspondence intended for Suzanne Everett Throop, including a large number of love letters from "Marguerite" between 1897 and 1898 and some additional letters from "Harriet" and "Chandler" in the 1920s. Subjects in the papers include Mark Twain, the literary criticism and interpretation of Herman Melville's works and American literature generally, the West in fiction, rivers in the United States, cowboys in popular culture, the history of Plymouth Rock, and the publishing of poetry in the United States.

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Reynolds Price papers, 1880-2014 and undated 151 Linear Feet — 1 Gigabyte — 1,300 document (MS Word and text formats) and digital image files; approximately 1 gigabytes. — 354 boxes

Reynolds Price (1933-2011) was a novelist, short story writer, poet, dramatist, essayist, translator, and James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University, where he taught creative writing and literature beginning in 1958. He was an alumnus of Duke and of Oxford University, which he attended on a Rhodes Scholarship. He received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and his books were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. The collection is comprised of correspondence, writings, serials, clippings, speeches, interviews, legal and financial papers, photographs, audiovisual materials, and digital materials reflecting Price's career and personal life. Personal and professional correspondence document his education at Duke University, especially his studies under William Blackburn; his period abroad as a Rhodes Scholar at Merton College, Oxford; and his literary work and interaction with other authors, including Stephen Spender, Eudora Welty, and Allan Gurganus. Writings include manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, outlines, and notes produced in the creation and publication of all his major works, including: A Long and Happy Life; Kate Vaiden; A Palpable God; Clear Pictures; A Whole New Life; The Collected Stories; The Collected Poems; A Letter to a Godchild; Ardent Spirits; The Good Priest's Son, and many other books, individual stories, poems, and essays.

The (1) Correspondence Series is divided into the Correspondence, chronological subseries and the Correspondence, alphabetical by name subseries. The chronological correspondence subseries consists of letters to and from family, friends, teachers, and admirers of Price's work. The alphabetical correspondence subseries comprises correspondence between Price and other writers, literary figures, celebrities, and close friends including Eudora Welty and Stephen Spender. The (2) Writings Series contains various writings by Price and is divided into the Books, Scribner's Files, Uncollected Fiction and Nonfiction, Price Writing in Serials, Reviews by Price, Addresses and Speeches, and Audiovisual Recordings of Price Regarding Writing subseries. The Books subseries is composed chiefly of drafts, typescripts, and proofs of Price's novels, plays, autobiographical works, and volumes of poetry.

The (3) Events Series contains materials documenting Price's achievements, his education, and performances of his dramatic work and his speaking engagements, as well as performances, and presentations of interest to Price. The (4) Personal Papers Series has expanded significantly following the author's death. The Series contains many of the books, letters, art and photographs kept in his home, including personal health and financial records. The Series also includes personal scrapbooks, his postcard collection, and a collection of family home movies. Price's teaching career in the Duke University English Department is documented by the (5) Duke University Series. And manuscripts sent to Price by fellow authors and students make up the (6) Writings by Others Series.

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The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures, including authors, poets, playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages.

The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including authors and poets, as well as twentieth-century playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. There are often letters and notes bearing autographs of the authors, some of them purchased by Taylor, or obtained with the assistance of Taylor's mother or her friend, Dorothy Kraus. Unfortunately, many of the autographed items have been removed. Pages often include handwritten or typed lists of works. There are several black-and-white photographs, along with photo postcards, and regular postcards. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages. Scrapbooks have been disbound for conservation purposes.

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Lin Carter (1930-1988, aka H. P. Lowcraft, Grail Undwin) was an American author of science fiction and fantasy, editor, poet and critic. The Lin Carter Papers span the years 1900 to 2001 and consist mainly of documents stemming from Carter's own work as a writer and editor, other authors' manuscripts sent to Carter, unidentified writings likely being written by Carter, and personal and professional correspondence addressed to Carter (e.g. with Sprague de Camp, Roy A. Squires, et al.).

The Lin Carter Papers span the years 1900 to 2001 and consist mainly of documents stemming from Carter's own work as a writer and editor, other authors' manuscripts sent to Carter, unidentified writings likely being written by Carter, and personal and professional correspondence addressed to Carter (e.g. with Sprague de Camp, Roy A. Squires, et al.). Included also are some legal, financial, and other official documents (e.g. Carter's first divorce and army papers, agreements with publishers, etc.), personal photographs, and some personal artifacts (wallet with ID cards, name tag of the Brotherhood of Jedi Knights, etc.). Materials on Carter's own writings include manuscripts, typescripts, notes and notebooks as well as clipped articles, sketches and other materials (e.g. with regard to the Thongor, Eric Carstairs of Zanthodon, Callisto, and Conan series; Atlantis trilogy, Wizard of Oz writings, "posthumous collaborations" on Robert E. Howard's Conan the Barbarian, Clark Ashton Smith's Book of Eibon, and H. P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos and Necronomicon, planned writings and anthologies, etc.). Papers with regard to Carter's work as an editor include manuscripts, typescripts, notes, and correspondence with regard to Weird Tales, Bellantine Adult Fantasy series, Flashing Swords!, The Year's Best Fantasy Stories, Carter's Clark Ashton Smith Biography, and his research on H. P. Lovecraft (including copies and transcripts of letters, manuscripts, and official documents by the latter two). Some papers refer to Carter's memberships in the literary club the Trap Door Spiders, the Swordsmen and Sorcerers' Guild of America (SAGA), The New Kalem Club, and the International Wizard of Oz Club. Most of the materials are in very good condition. Some of Carter's published works included in this collection are reprints by Wildside Press, dating to the 1990s and 2000s. Some pages of paper typescripts might be fragile.

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Will Inman papers, 1910-2009 69.5 Linear Feet — 42,754 Items

The correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, and printed material in the Will Inman Papers span from 1939-1999, and serve to document the life and literary career of the poet, essayist, editor, educator, and publisher.

Inman was a prolific corespondent and maintained regular correspondent relationships with his friends and family, as well as with his readers and other editors and authors. He also regularly wrote to political and social figures during the 1960s. These letters to public and political figures express admiration and voice concerns about political events and social conditions. Inman protested in favor of civil rights, ending the war in Vietnam, and various environmental causes, and his letters reflect his thoughts and opinions on these subjects. Inman was also in regular contact with the editors and publishers of various literary magazines and the letters to these individuals document his efforts to publish his work. The collection holds many of Inman's out going correspondence as he regularly kept copies of his own letters.

Inman's copious diaries provide almost daily detail of his life from 1950-1994. In his diaries Inman recorded daily events, poetic inspirations, and his responses to world events. The diaries also include information about the poetry he is working on and several include typescripts of completed poems.

Inman also kept detailed records concerning his completed writings. He kept typescript copies of his poems and other writings, ordering them chronologically into notebooks, and recording publication information onto the typescripts. In organizing this collection, Inman's notebooks were discarded, but the typescripts maintain the order they held while bound in the notebooks, and serve to provide a chronological overview of Inman's published and unpublished writings.

This collection also contains copies of several of the anthologies and literary magazines where Inman published his work and several of the poetic monographs that Inman authored.

Inman regularly published his early work in newspapers in North Carolina. The collection contains clippings of these early published works as well as clippings of Inman's mid 1960's newspaper column "Conchsounds in the Hills."

There are also photographs of the McGirt family from ca. 1910, chiefly mounted in albums, as well as Inman's baby book from 1923. (16 accessions from 1998 and 1999) (35,475 items, 59 linear feet; dated 1910-1999)

The addition (accession #2001-0195) (1676 items, 2.7 linear feet; dated 1940-2001, bulk 1976-2001) comprises mainly personal correspondence to and from Inman and Jimmy Santiago Baca, 1971-1995, including typescript poetry. It also includes typescript poetry by Inman as Bill McGirt, 1940-1956; other poetry by Inman; professional correspondence; and a journal kept by Inman, 2000-2001.

The addition (accession #2002-0143) (2250 items, 3.60 linear feet; dated 1982-2001) consists primarily of incoming and outgoing personal correspondence. Topics include Inman's poems, publication work, and his political activites. There is also poetry and prose by Inman and others, and 20 black-and-white and 148 color photographs.

The addition (accession# 2003-0124 and 2003-0181)(2775 items, 3.6 linear feet; dated 1957-2003, bulk 1970-1989) contains published and unpublished typescript poetry written by Will Inman. Also includes literary newsletters, periodicals and brochures; a notebook containing poetry, biographical information and professional correspondence; and a paperweight.

Addition (2009-0263) (500 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1976-2009) includes correspondence, poetry by Inman and others, press releases and reviews, official documents (such as his birth certificate, insurance information, and medical documents), and materials from Inman's death and funeral.

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Wallace Fowlie papers, 1911-1998 and undated 5 Linear Feet — 516 Items

Writer, critic, translator, and faculty member at Duke University specializing in modern French literature. The Wallace Fowlie Papers span the years 1911 to 1998 and consist mainly of correspondence sent to Fowlie, but also texts from Fowlie's personal library, publications on French literature authored by Fowlie, typescript and handwritten drafts by Fowlie, amd clippings pertaining to Fowlie's career. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises exchanges between Fowlie and Thomas and Kit Foster. These letters mainly address personal and family matters (health issues, vacations and meeting with mutual friends), but also cover projects Fowlie was working on, teaching positions accepted and rejected and class progress, and other matters of professional relevance. There is also a folder of correspondence with Fowlie, almost entirely in French, that was maintained by John M. Dunaway, a Romance Languages professor at Mercer College in Georgia. It includes a few color photographs. Other smaller amounts of correspondence come from Robert Heslen, a former student of Fowlie, and well-known writers/artists including René Char, Jean Cocteau, André Gide, Alexis Léger (Saint-Jean Perse), Marianne Moore, Anaïs Nin, and others, discussing literary matters and their writings and careers. There are letters from Fowlie to Walter Muther. A folder of general correspondence contains single letters from a variety of colleagues and friends. Selections from Fowlie's library are sorted into works and translations by Fowlie, and works he used privately or for his own research.

The Wallace Fowlie Papers span the years 1911 to 1998 and consist mainly of correspondence sent to Fowlie, but also texts from Fowlie's personal library, publications on French literature authored by Fowlie, typescript and handwritten drafts by Fowlie, amd clippings pertaining to Fowlie's career. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises exchanges between Fowlie and Thomas and Kit Foster. These letters mainly address personal and family matters (health issues, vacations and meeting with mutual friends), but also cover projects Fowlie was working on, teaching positions accepted and rejected and class progress, and other matters of professional relevance. There is also a folder of correspondence with Fowlie, almost entirely in French, that was maintained by John M. Dunaway, a Romance Languages professor at Mercer College in Georgia. It includes a few color photographs. Other smaller amounts of correspondence come from Robert Heslen, a former student of Fowlie, and well-known writers/artists including René Char, Jean Cocteau, André Gide, Alexis Léger (Saint-Jean Perse), Marianne Moore, Anaïs Nin, and others, discussing literary matters and their writings and careers. There are letters from Fowlie to Walter Muther. A folder of general correspondence contains single letters from a variety of colleagues and friends. Selections from Fowlie's library are sorted into works and translations by Fowlie, and works he used privately or for his own research.

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Helen Smith Bevington papers, 1918-2001 9.75 Linear Feet — 3422 Items

Family and personal papers, primarily Bevington's personal and professional correspondence (1931-2001), which includes letters from Ray Bradbury (1976-1993); typescripts of diary entries (1959-1989); 22 heavily annotated books of modern poetry, and research notes. There are also correspondence and professional records for Bevington's husband, Merle. Other items include one color and 9 black-and-white photographs, a scrapbook, passports, geneology information/records, awards, newspaper clippings, class records, and unpublished manuscripts.