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Alexander Blackburn papers, 1880-1999 12 Linear Feet — 14602 Items

Professor emeritus of English and Creative Writing at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs; novelist; son of Duke University faculty member William M. Blackburn. Writings and correspondence of Alexander Blackburn, including books, correspondence, drafts, and typescripts of unpublished works. Also includes Blackburn and Cheney family history materials, photographs, and a scrapbook.

Collection contains two accessions. Accession (1999-0184) (1102 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 1953-1998), consists primarily of writings by Alexander Blackburn, including books, articles, clippings, and typescripts of unpublished works. Also included are correspondence with writer Frank Waters and some other letters; memorabilia; and editorial files and an almost complete run of the literary journal, Writer's Forum, which Blackburn edited.

Accession (2010-0012) (6750 items; 9 lin. ft.; dated 1880-1990s) includes writings, drafts, books, and family history materials. Included are materials from Alexander Blackburn's mother, Elizabeth Cheney Blackburn, and the Cheney family.

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Anita Shreve papers, 1982-2002 14 Linear Feet — 721 Items

Freelance journalist and writer in the United States. Galley proofs, typescripts, drafts, and notes for Shreve's work. Also includes files from her literary agent.

Collection (Accession 2002-0120) (21 items, 2.4 lin. ft.; dated 1987-2001) comprises primarily page and galley proofs, as well as typescripts for six of Shreve's novels and nonfiction books (1987-2001). The books include The Last Time They Met, Fortune's Rocks, Strange Fits of Passion, The Weight of Water, Remaking Motherhood, and Resistance.

Addition (Accession 2002-0136) (300 items; 10.80 lin. ft.; dated [ca. 1989]-2002) consists primarily of typescript and hand-written drafts, proofs, hand-written notes, and research for novels by Shreve ([ca. 1989]-2002), including Fortune's Rocks, The Pilot's Wife, Sea Glass, and The Weight of Water. Addition also includes editor and publisher correspondence, contracts, and royalty statements (1992-1993).

Addition (Accession 2003-0222) (3 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 2002-2003) consists of the typescript (with editing marks) and master proof of Shreve's novel All He Ever Wanted (2003), along with a piece of correspondence from the publisher.

Addition (Accession 2011-0059) (400 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1982-1995) contains files about Shreve kept by Virginia Barber, her literary agent. Includes correspondence between them as well as Barber's correspondence and other materials promoting Shreve's work.

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Anne Tyler papers, 1958-2016 29 Linear Feet — 8300 Items

Pulitzer Prize winning author of The Accidental Tourist, Breathing Lessons, Celestial Navigation, Ladder of Years, and other popular novels. Collection includes manuscript drafts, printed material, holograph manuscripts and typescripts of Tyler's novels and short stories, including Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant; clippings of articles about Tyler and her writings; serials containing articles by or about Tyler and her work; correspondence between Tyler and her publishers; and materials regarding adaptations of her novels, including the movie The Accidental Tourist. Later additions include holograph manuscripts of A Patchwork Planet and Noah's Compass; an advance uncorrected proof of Back When We Were Grownups (2001); drafts for Digging to America, The Amateur Marriage, Back When We Were Grownups, The Beginner's Goodbye, A Blue Spool of Thread, Vinegar Girl, and Clock Dance; correspondence between Tyler and her editors and agents; publicity materials; some Tyler family correspondence; book reviews; and book covers.

The collection includes manuscript drafts, printed material, holograph manuscripts and typescripts of Tyler's novels and short stories; clippings of articles about Tyler and her writings; serials containing articles by or about Tyler and her work; Tyler's work-related and personal correspondence; and clipping and other materials regarding adaptations of her works, including the movie The Accidental Tourist. Later additions include holograph manuscripts of A Patchwork Planet and Noah's Compass; an advance uncorrected proof of Back When We Were Grownups (2001); drafts for Digging to America, The Amateur Marriage, Back When We Were Grownups, The Beginner's Goodbye, A Blue Spool of Thread, Vinegar Girl, and Clock Dance; correspondence between Tyler and her editors and agents; publicity materials; some Tyler family correspondence; book reviews; and book covers.

The Writings series contains novels, short stories, essays, and book reviews written by Tyler. The novels are all in draft form, with the exception of one advance uncorrected proof. Arranged in folders by date of publication, the Novels subseries includes drafts of all novels Tyler wrote between 1961 and 2016. Most of Tyler's initial drafts are handwritten, as are all of the editing marks. She also made notes for herself regarding the characters and locations in her novels. Her notes include character details and hand-drawn house floorplans. This subseries gives insight into Tyler's writing and editing process. The Short Stories & Other Writings subseries includes published and unpublished short stories, clippings, and a booklet of student essays from Tyler's time at Duke University. Oversize writings can be found in the Miscellaneous & Oversize Materials series.

The Correspondence series contains letters received or written by Anne Tyler, though the majority of the correspondence was written to Tyler. She received mail from a wide range of people, including reporters, fans, friends, publishers, editors, and event coordinators. The majority of series is arranged chronologically and provides insight into the relationships that Tyler built due to her writing, and the friendships forged through continued correspondence. One folder in this series is restricted.

The Printed Materials series contains a wide variety of materials related to Tyler and her writings. A substantial portion of this series is comprised of clippings from newspapers and magazines. Either Tyler herself or a friend or colleague subscribed to a clipping service; many book review and publicity clippings were clipped by Durrant's, an international clipping service. This series also contains materials from Eudora Welty and Tyler's speaking engagement at Duke University in 1982. This was one of the few public appearances that Tyler has made. She does not generally give interviews or go on book tours. Oversize jacket art and publicity materials can be found in the Miscellaneous & Oversize Materials series.

This collection is processed and has some restrictions. Please contact Research Services prior to coming to Special Collections to use this material.

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Dorothy Allison papers, 1965-2010 92.5 Linear Feet — 69,375 Items

Dorothy Allison is an author and feminist who has written numerous books and short stories, including Trash (1988), Bastard Out of Carolina (1992), and Cavedweller (1998). The Dorothy Allison Papers include drafts and manuscripts of her writings (including Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, Cavedweller, and other works), personal and professional correspondence, research materials and subject files, her personal journals, and other materials. Includes some photographs, electronic files, and oversize materials. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Dorothy Allison Papers include drafts and manuscripts of her writings (including Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, Cavedweller, and other works). All of Allison's unpublished works are RESTRICTED and require permission from the creator prior to use. Personal and professional correspondence, including exchanges with her publishers and other authors, are held in the chronological and work files. The collection also contains Allison's research materials and subject files, covering topics on feminism, lesbianism, sexuality, pornography, writing, and other related files. Allison's journals, dating from 1985 through the 2000s, consist of both handwritten and electronic formats, with all of the electronic journals printed for the archive. All of Allison's journals are RESTRICTED and require permission from the creator prior to use. Also included are materials from her speaking engagements, workshops, and other professional activities. There are a variety of special formats within the collection, including some photographs, electronic files, audio tapes, video cassettes, DVDs, and oversize posters.

Collection was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Dorothy E. Roberts papers, 1903-1993 2.5 Linear Feet — approx. 2000 Items

Dorothy Roberts worked in the Dept. of English's administration office from 1948 until her retirement in the late 1980's-early 1990's. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, printed material and other items created and collected by Dorothy Roberts about the Dept. of English at Duke University. Files largely pertain to the history of the department, focusing heavily on departmental faculty. The collection ranges in date from 1903-1993.

The collection largely consists of material compiled by Roberts, who functioned as historian of the Dept. of English. Of note are the various lists of faculty, Ph.D. candidates and staff of the department over a number of years. Also included are files she maintained on faculty members, which include correspondence and clippings as well as a file Roberts kept on herself regarding her career at Duke. She also provides her impressions of key departmental staff, namely the chairmen she worked for. In 1982, Roberts donated 14 letters between her and Guy Davenport, a Duke alumnus, regarding Paris and other European cities as well of Davenport's appreciation of James Joyce and Roberts' own love of traveling abroad. Roberts' friendship with Reynolds Price is represented in the collection. There are several folders on him which include correspondence, Christmas cards, photographs, clippings, and an envelope which holds locks of Price's hair. Of particular note is a sketch Price drew of Emily Dickinson that he gave to Roberts. There is also a caricature of Ph.D. candidates, including Price, from 1962.

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Elliott Crayton McCants papers, 1886-1950 2.5 Linear Feet — 163 Items

Superintendent of schools in Anderson, S.C.; author. The collection contains largely correspondence concerning the publication of McCants' writings.

Chiefly correspondence by E.C. McCants concerning the publication of his writings. Some letters refer to school issues. Also includes contracts for published books, copies of his writings, clippings, and a program of a banquet given in 1940 in honor of E.C. McCants. His field of writing most often concerned South Carolina history and legends.

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Fred Chappell papers, 1944-2019 and undated 158 Linear Feet — 5.9 Gigabytes

The fully processed portion of the Fred Chappell Papers spans the dates 1960-1997, with the bulk being dated after 1970. There are several additions covering the years 1998 through 2015. The collection consists of correspondence; writings by Chappell and other authors; printed material (primarily serials containing stories, poems, and articles by Chappell but also clippings); legal and financial papers; speeches and addresses; interviews; and other material. Documents relate to Chappell's personal life and career, both as a student and writer at Duke University, where he studied under well-known creative writing teacher William Blackburn, and as a writer and professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNC-G). The collection documents the entire length and breadth of Chappell's multifaceted career, beginning with the years just after he completed his undergraduate studies at Duke and started his first novel at the urging of Hiram Haydn, an editor to whom Blackburn had introduced him. Letters, manuscripts, and notebooks provide insight into Chappell's developing literary career, his academic activities at UNC-G, and his growing involvement with a large network of writers, including a number of his former students. Many prominent American authors, especially Southern ones, are represented in the collection. Among the most frequent correspondents are Kelly Cherry, Grace DiSanto, George Garrett, Marianne Gingher, Dana Gioia, Donald Hall, Heather Ross Miller, Robert Morgan, Eve Shelnutt, and Dabney Stuart. Notebooks, manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, and printed material document the development of Chappell's career across all the genres in which he writes. Supporting material in non-print media, including photographs and audio and video cassettes of readings, document public aspects of his career.

The Correspondence Series, arranged chronologically in Incoming and Outgoing subseries, discloses the range of Chappell's interests and activities in the literary community. The letters not only provide a portrait of his development as a poet and novelist but also demonstrate his active roles in supporting the careers of other writers and promoting the literary community. These latter activities are documented by his numerous affirmative responses to a broad range of requests to read drafts of works-in-progress, write recommendations for other writers for grants and awards, write reviews and provide blurbs for new publications, serve as the judge of contests, speak at conferences and workshops, and serve in various advisory and editorial capacities for literary journals. The correspondence also provides much information about his teaching career and his legacy of students who develop successful careers of their own, such as Cherry, Miller, Morgan, and Shelnutt. The bulk of the outgoing correspondence dates to 1990 or after, when, at the request of the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library, Chappell began retaining copies of all outgoing correspondence.

The Writings by Chappell Series is divided into subseries by genres with the exception of one subseries based on format, the Notebooks Subseries. Since Chappell writes with relatively few hand corrections on any particular stage of his work, the development of an individual work is often apparent only by comparing various complete drafts in manuscripts, typescripts, and proofs. The notebooks are particularly valuable in this regard, providing what often appear to be the earliest versions of works. The notebooks also indicate the facility with which Chappell moves from one genre to another, as most of them are not devoted to a single work or genre but rather include poems, stories, novel fragments, essays, reviews, translations, and drafts of correspondence following one after the other. This versatility is further reflected by the Printed Materials Series, which contains extensive serials with Chappell's publications in multiple genres, especially fiction, poetry, and reviews. At the end of this series, the Clippings Subseries documents his public and critical reception with copies of reviews and essays about his work and publicity about it.

The Miscellaneous Series contains a variety of flyers, leaflets, newsletters, and examples of fan mail that further demonstrate his literary career. Prominent here are such items as the proofs for a 1990 symposium about his poetry and newsletters of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. It also contains two small subseries of audio and video cassettes of readings, interviews, and work by other authors.

The Writings by Others Series contains manuscripts from well-known contemporary writers, ex-students, and aspiring writers seeking advice. Chappell's reactions to the manuscripts are written on many of them, often as the first draft of a letter or requested recommendation. Most writers are represented by only one or two items, but Cherry and Shelnutt are both represented by more than a dozen pieces that, together with their frequent correspondence, outline the development of their respective careers.

Later additions to the collection include incoming and outgoing correspondence, drafts and writings of Chappell's poetry, honors and awards, and printed materials and publications featuring Chappell or his work. Most accessions include bound volumes as well as writings and manuscripts by other authors or poets. There are also some oversize materials, audiovisual materials, clippings, and photographs. These additions have been loosely sorted but have not been incorporated physically or intellectually into the originally processed collection. Please consult Research Services with questions about using these materials.

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George P. Garrett (1929-2008) was a poet, editor, author, and professor of English. The papers of George P. Garrett span the years 1929 to 2000 with the bulk of the material being dated between 1960 and 1990. The papers were initially collected and assembled by author, bibliographer, and publisher Stuart T. Wright. Wright published a number of Garrett's works at his Palaemon Press and also assembled the Stuart Wright Bibliographic Collection of George Garrett (see related materials held by the Rubenstein Library). Additional materials were received by the Library directly from George Garrett. The papers document Garrett's literary career as an author of novels, short stories, poetry, and dramatic works (including filmscripts) and the tremendous influence he had as an English professor and an editor on an entire generation of writers, particularly in the South. Correspondence with numerous authors, publishers, and educators offers much information about the history of 20th-century Southern literature, publishing, and literary education. The collection is divided into the Writings Series (with subseries of Writings by Garrett, Writings Edited by Garrett, Writings by Others, and Proofs); the Correspondence Series (with 5 subseries of alphabetically and chronologically arranged correspondence); the Audiovisual Material Series; and the Miscellaneous Papers Series.

The papers of George P. Garrett span the years 1929 to 2000 with the bulk of the material being dated between 1960 and 1990. The papers were initially collected and assembled by author, bibliographer, and publisher Stuart T. Wright. Wright published a number of Garrett's works at his Palaemon Press and also assembled the Stuart Wright Bibliographic Collection of George Garrett (see related materials held by the Rubenstein Library). Additional materials were received by the Library directly from George Garrett.

The collection primarily documents Garrett's literary career as an author of novels, short stories, poetry, and dramatic works (including filmscripts) and the tremendous influence he had as an English professor and an editor on an entire generation of writers, particularly in the South. Correspondence with numerous authors, publishers, and educators offers much information about the history of 20th-century Southern literature, publishing, and literary education. The collection is divided into the Writings Series (with subseries of Writings by Garrett, Writings Edited by Garrett, Writings by Others, and Proofs); the Correspondence Series (with 5 subseries of alphabetically and chronologically arranged correspondence); the Audiovisual Material Series; and the Miscellaneous Papers Series.

The Alphabetical Correspondence Subseries: Group A contains letters from numerous contemporary American authors, among them Madison Smartt Bell, who wrote regarding the progress of his fiction, his experience with publishers and literary agents, and his interview with Garrett for Paris Review; and Fred Chappell, whose letters provide commentary on his own works The Inkling and Dagon as well as praise for Garrett's Death of the Fox,The Magic Striptease, and Welcome to the Medicine Show. The Writings by Others Subseries contains Bell's interview with Garrett, in which Garrett discusses his writing process, and critical essays by Fred Chappell (including one on Garrett's The Stranger in the Mirror and one on the work of Sylvia Wilkinson). The Proofs Subseries contains a proof of Reynolds Price's Collected Stories, with brief comments by Garrett.

Garrett's own literary career is documented throughout the collection. The Writings by Garrett Subseries contains manuscripts, typescripts, notes, and drafts of his work, some of it bearing notes for revision. The Chronological Correspondence Subseries contains letters in which Garrett wrote about his works in progress and letters from friends and publishers regarding his work. The comments of noted literary figures regarding Garrett's work frequently appear in letters in the Alphabetical Correspondence Subseries: Group A. This series also affords researchers a detailed view of literary criticism and support exchanged between Garrett and the many authors represented in the collection. His negotiations with publishers are best documented in the Alphabetical Correspondence Subseries: Group B. The Audiovisual Material Series contains some recordings of Garrett reading from his own work.

The Audiovisual Material Series, which contains many recordings of Garrett's lectures, classes, and addresses to groups of writers, students, and literary scholars, documents Garrett's teaching style and his ideas on the teaching of writing. Recordings of lectures and readings by many other well-known authors also appear in this series. Garrett's impact on his students and fellow authors is again visible in the Writings by Others Subseries, which consists of numerous manuscripts, typescripts, and drafts (some bearing notes by Garrett) of work sent to Garrett for commentary and revision.

The addition (Acc. 1998-0356) (5500 items, 15 linear feet; dated 1980-1998 [bulk 1995-1997]) further documents the life, career, and writing of the author and educator. It consists of audiotapes of various authors, including Garrett reading their works; a videocassette entitled "The Great Gatsby"; printed materials and writings, including published books, journals, drafts, and bound proofs; a large amount of personal and business correspondence; and manuscripts submitted to Garrett for comment.

The addition (Acc. 1999-0268) (1 item, 0.3 linear feet; dated [ca. 1996]) consists of a photocopied typescript of Garrett's novel The King of Babylon Shall Not Come Against You with handwritten annotations.

The addition (Acc. 1999-0379) (450 items, 0.6 linear feet; dated 1956-1972) is primarily comprised of incoming correspondence, chiefly professional; a number of writings are interfiled with or attached to letters. Also included are miscellaneous printed materials such as brochures and clippings.

The addition (Acc. 2000-0085) (9100 items, dated 1964-1999) further documents Garrett's literary career with additional manuscripts, often parts of or related to The King of Babylon Shall not Come Against You. There are audiotapes of readings by Garrett and others, literary correspondence, and clippings.

The addition (Acc. 2000-0303) (15 items, 1 linear foot; dated 1995-2000) documents some of Garrett's writing process and his direct comments in readings and on videotape. Included are page proofs and a revised typescript of The King of Babylon Shall Not Come Against You, a revised typescript of Entered From the Sun, 11 cassette tapes of readings and lectures presumably by Garrett, and a videotape entitled "Writers - East of the Blue Ridge" on which he is interviewed.

The addition (Acc. 2002-0034) (1 item, 1 lin. ft.; dated 2002) comprises an uncorrected page proof, with color cover, for Garrett's Going to See the Elephant: Pieces of a Writing Life. This accession is unprocessed and has been interfiled.

Additions (Acc. 2005-0067) (1875 items, 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1990s-2003) and (Acc. 2004-0133) (2 items, 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 2004) comprise manuscripts, drafts, notes, typescripts, and correspondence for Double Vision, The Year in Fiction, and Every Bitter Thing. Also includes typescripts, notes, holograph manuscripts, and typescripts with holograph corrections for essays, stories, and other writings; and a broadside of Garrett's poem, Luck's Shinning Child, printed for the 2004 Virginia Festival of the Book.

The addition (Acc. 2006-0090) (750 items, 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2005-2006) contains proofs for Bad Man Blues and The King of Babylon Shall not Come Against You.; manuscripts for Godfather and several short stories; print materials including books and journals authored or edited by Garrett; 2 DVDs; and 12 computer diskettes. The content of these diskettes has been migrated to archival storage server. Closed pending processing.

The addition (Acc. 2007-0075)(5,400 items; 7.2 lin. ft.; dated 1971-2006) primarily contains drafts of Garrett's writings as typescripts and electronic files on diskettes. Also included are books and journals that feature his works and works of other authors; audiocassettes and CDs of interviews and readings by Garrett; and correspondence. Closed pending processing.

The addition (Acc. 2008-0181) (760 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2008) contains notes, research, and drafts of Garrett's short story "The Source", eventually renamed "Thanksgiving". There are also some folders of correspondence, transcripts of interviews, and some audiovisual material including four audiocassette tapes and one DVD.

The addition (Acc. 2008-0271) (375 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1985-2008) contains correspondence; drafts and notes for poems and other projects, including an "Armies of Occupation" project; and copies of newspaper clippings and interviews with Garrett.

Addition (Acc. 2013-0168) (50 items, 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 1964-1972) comprises a file of letters to Garrett from those whose last names begin with the letter "P."

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The records of the Harriet Wasserman Literary Agency span the dates 1948-1993, with most of the records dating after 1974. The records dated prior to 1981, when the agency was formed, are those of writers who were Wasserman's clients when she was employed at the Russell and Volkening agency and stayed with her when she formed her own agency. The collection documents the careers of individual writers and in doing so indicates the varied activities of a major literary agency: preparation and submission of manuscripts, negotiation of contracts, handling of foreign and reprint rights, publicity, and the differing ways affairs are handled for lesser known or beginning writers and for major authors. Among the more prominent American fiction writers included are Richard Bausch, Saul Bellow, Frederick Buechner, Oscar Hijuelos, Josephine Humphreys, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Alice McDermott, and Reynolds Price. In addition, records about historian George F. Kennan and philosopher and historian Allan Bloom are included. The correspondence is primarily about professional matters, although some sense of the personal relationships between the agent and the more prominent clients can be gleaned.

By far, the Bellow papers comprise the largest group relating to any single author, and cover the longest span of years, from 1948 to 1993. There are relatively few papers from 1948 to 1972, but those present contain a few personal letters to Bellow from his contemporaries such as the novelists Ralph Ellison and Wright Morris. The bulk of the Bellow papers date from 1973, and convey a clear impression of the activity surrounding his increasing fame, particularly with the publication of Humboldt's Gift, the 1975 Pulitzer Prize for that novel, and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1976. After that date his later career is sketched in detail and follows from inception through publication such works as The Dean's December, More Die of Heartbreak, and It All Adds Up.

The collection includes, in smaller amounts, material about the careers of other authors. In the current accession, the Bausch and Jhabvala papers are particularly rich among the fiction writers. Bausch's career is outlined from his breaking into the profession in the mid-1970s to his establishment as a major author by the late 1980s. Jhabvala's papers pick up in mid-career, when she has already published several novels and won the Booker Prize in England, but prior to her growing fame as a screenwriter for Merchant Ivory Productions. Her correspondence also includes a number of letters from director James Ivory and producer Ismail Merchant, particularly relating to the development of the film The Autobiography of a Princess (1975) and the accompanying photography book of the same name.

Of special note are the records about Reynolds Price and Josephine Humphreys. While the HWLA collection contains some unique items about these writers, especially Price, scholars should be aware that the Library is also the primary repository for the personal papers of these writers. Much more information is available in their respective collections.

Among non-fiction writers in the current (1995) accession, the papers of historian George F. Kennan and philosopher Allan Bloom document their careers in the 1980s. Most of the Bloom papers relate to the publicity surrounding the publication of The Closing of the American Mind, particularly reviews and speaking engagements. The Kennan material is more varied, including not only Wasserman's correspondence on Kennan's behalf, but several dozen lengthy letters from Kennan to Wasserman and others.

The 1999 addition (accession #1999-0275) (19,500 items, 32.5 lin. ft.; dated 1974-1999 and undated) expands on all of the collection series, especially materials related to Saul Bellow.

The 2001 addition (accession #2001-0050) (816 items, 12 lin. ft.; dated 1974-2000 and undated) includes book manuscripts, galley proofs (some inscribed), correspondence, notes, and other materials relating to the authors represented by the literary agency. Other materials include sixty-four black-and-white photographs, one black-and-white negative, four color photographs, and one audiocassette tape. Authors included in this addition are Richard Bausch, Jay Williams, Suzi-Lori Parks, Laurel Lee, Karla Kuskin, Elinore Clark, Perrin Ireland, Frederick Buechner, John Tyler Bonner, Martha Moody, Eugene Walter, Caroline Winthrop, Paul Lussier, Sharon Flake, Reynolds Price, Josephine Humphreys, Saul Bellow, George Dawson and Richard Glaubman, Julia Markus, George F. Kennan, Carole L. Glickfeld, Mark Winegardner, Michael Stewart, Diane Vreuls, Sandra Gould Ford, Charles McPhee, Mark Smith, and Harriet Wasserman herself.

The second 2001 addition (accession #2001-0115) (5 items, .1 linear feet; dated 1978-2001, bulk 1997-2001) contains correspondence between Wasserman and Shelley Gruskin. It also includes a playbill for performances of In Dreams Begin Responsibilities and Gimpel the Fool, signed by actor David Marguiles and a copy of Delmore Schwartz's In Dreams Begin Responsibilities and Other Stories. Both book and playbill are mentioned in the correspondence.

The 2003 addition (accession #2003-0051)(12,500 items, 30 linear feet, dated 1982-2000) consists chiefly of client files (correspondence, contracts, financial records, etc.), manuscripts and proofs of books by clients, published versions of books by clients, and related materials. Includes especially significant material for Saul Bellow and a few other authors, including Oscar Hijuelos and George Frost Kennan.

Addition (08-004) (18,000 items; 24 lin. ft.; dated 1984-2006) consists chiefly of client files (correspondence, contracts, financial records, etc.), manuscripts and proofs of books by clients, published versions clients, and related materials. Includes especially significant material for Saul Bellow and a few other authors, including Oscar Hijuelos and George Frost Kennan.

Addition (08-078) (8 items; .2 lin. ft.; dated 1984-2000) includes writing samples for agency authors, as well as literary award kits and publications.

Addition (12-008) (2250 items; 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1972-2003) consists of agency files about author Reynolds Price, including general correspondence, contracts, book reviews, and other related materials.

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James Leslie Woodress papers, 1941-1976 2.4 Linear Feet — 1112 Items

Professor of American literature at the University of California, Davis. The James Leslie Woodress Papers span the years from 1941 to 1976. The collection (2.4 linear feet) consists mainly of professional papers including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, editors and publishers, copyright holders, libraries, and others regarding the production of a number of Woodress' published works on the history of American literature.

The James Leslie Woodress Papers span the years from 1941 to 1976. The collection consists mainly of professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, editors and publishers, copyright holders, libraries, and others regarding the production of a number of Woodress' published works, including Booth Tarkington: Gentleman from Indiana, Dissertations in American Literature, Eight American Authors, Essays Mostly on Periodical Publishing in America: A Collection in Honor of Clarence Gohdes, Howells and Italy, A Yankee's Odyssey: The Life of Joel Barlow, and "Voices from America's Past," a historical pamphlets series. Among the significant correspondents are Ashbel G. Brice and John Menapace of the Duke University Press, Elizabeth Blackert and Robert F. Wilson of McGraw-Hill, and scholars such as Walter Blair, Hugh Holman, Jay B. Hubbell, Lewis Leary, Floyd Stovall, and Willard Thorp. Background notes and drafts of publication materials are also contained in the collection. The collection is divided into seven series, corresponding to Woodress' published works and arranged in alphabetical order by title: Booth Tarkington, Dissertations in American Literature, Eight American Authors, Essays Mostly on Periodical Publishing in America, Howells and Italy, Voices from America's Past, and Yankee's Odyssey. These series are described fully below. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.