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Carolina Wren Press records, 1940-1994 and undated 80 Linear Feet — 117,750 Items

The Carolina Wren Press Records span the years 1940 through 1992, with most of the material dated between 1970 and 1990. The papers are divided into two large groups, the Carolina Wren Press Records and the Carolina Wren Press Records: Judy Hogan Papers.

The Carolina Wren Press Records group contains material relating to the founding and publishing activities of the press and to organizations with which the press was affiliated. The papers are divided into the following series: Correspondence, Writings, Publications, Printed Material, Lollipop Power Press (a feminist press publishing non-sexist children's books), Homegrown Books (a publication for reviews of small press work), Hyperion (a poetry journal), Grant Material, Organizations, Office Files, Financial Papers, COSMEP (Committee of Small Magazine Editors and Publishers), and Photographs and Audiovisual Material. Each of these series documents not only the growth and activities of Carolina Wren Press and associated organizations, but also the origins and development of the small press movement in the United States and particularly in the South.

The Carolina Wren Press Records: Judy Hogan Papers group documents the life and activities of the author Judy Hogan, the founder of Carolina Wren Press. The material is divided into the following series: Correspondence, Diaries, Writings, Teaching Materials, Financial Papers, Biographical Material. While some of the correspondence and diary entries may mention the Carolina Wren Press, the papers in this group focus primarily on Hogan's personal life, her education, her writing and projects, and her teaching activities.

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Author Dawn Langley Simmons had one of the first sex-reassignment surgeries in the United States. She was brought up as Gordon Langley Hall in England at Sissinghurst Castle, home of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, and adopted by the actress Margaret Rutherford. After surgery she assumed the identity Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, then became Dawn Langley Simmons after her marriage to John Paul Simmons. The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection includes material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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George Augustus Lofton papers, 1784-1941 14.2 Linear Feet — 1800 Items

The George Augustus Lofton Papers span the years 1874-1941, although the bulk of the material dates from 1875-1900. They consist of correspondence, writings and sermons, clippings, book reviews, and printed materials. The collection principally relates to Lofton's career as a Baptist minister serving churches in Dalton, Gal; Memphis, Tenn. (First Church); St. Louis, Mo. (Third Church); Talladega, Ala.; and Nashville, Tenn. (Central Church). The collection mostly contains handwritten sermons and sermon notes, and includes little family or personal material, although a few family letters are in the Correspondence Series. The Correspondence Series, however, primarily contains letters critiquing Lofton's works, Review of the Question and Bible Thoughts and Themes. The Writings and Speeches Series documents Lofton's intellectual growth throughout his career as author and minister. This series also contains Lofton's published text, Character Sketches (1890), and a manuscript draft of his autobiography titled, "My Family Garden." Lofton's sermons and sermon notes track both his spiritual development and writing skills throughout the years of his ministry. The sermon notes reveal his views on slavery, capital punishment, and foreign mission work. The Printed Materials Series includes published brochures and sermons written by Lofton and others, 1881-1914. The Miscellaneous Series contains an assortment of items from 1873-1940 including Lofton family photographs and other materials. Included are items pertaining to Baptist minister George Law Stewart and Dr. Adiel Sherwood.

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Harriet R. Holman papers, 1869-1986 16.5 Linear Feet — About 7899 Items

Author and professor of English from Anderson, S.C. Collection is chiefly significant for Holman's correspondence with writers, publishers and colleagues concerning the teaching and writing of American literature. Significant correspondents include Jay B. Hubbell, Rayburn Moore, Henry Field, Ann Page Johns, Armistead C. Gordon, Jr., Dr. Jeremiah N. Fusco, Corydon Bell, Guy Davenport, Edith Buchanan, Margaret Meaders, David Stocking, Marion Kingston Stocking, Newman I. White, E. M. Lander, Jr., Mattie U. Russell, and members of the Thomas Nelson Page and John Fox families. There are also letters from South Carolina authors, including Rosa Pendleton Chiles, Sidelle Ellis, Patricia Kneas Hill, Katharine M. Jones, Mary Boone Robertson Longley, and Alice L. O'Connell. Also includes works written or edited by Holman and others, a typed transcription of Cherokee stories as told by Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey, clippings, notecard files, printed material, and photographs of Thomas Nelson and Florence Lathrop Page, and Nannie Mae Tilley.

The papers of Harriet Rebecca Holman span the years 1869-1986, and are chiefly significant for Holman's correspondence with writers, publishers and colleagues concerning the teaching and writing of American literature. Significant correspondents include Jay B. Hubbell, Rayburn Moore, Henry Field, Ann Page Johns, Armistead C. Gordon, Jr., Dr. Jeremiah N. Fusco, Corydon Bell, Guy Davenport, Edith Buchanan, Margaret Meaders, David Stocking, Marion Kingston Stocking, Newman I. White, E. M. Lander, Jr., Mattie U. Russell and members of the Thomas Nelson Page and John Fox families. The Page family materials constitute a large portion of the materials in this collection and are represented by their own series. There are also letters from South Carolina authors, including Rosa Pendleton Chiles, Sidelle Ellis, Patricia Kneas Hill, Katharine M. Jones, Mary Boone Robertson Longley, and Alice L. O'Connell. Also includes works written or edited by Holman and others, a typed transcription of Cherokee stories as told by Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey, clippings, notecard files, printed material, and photographs of Thomas Nelson and Florence Lathrop Page, and Nannie Mae Tilley. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.

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The collection consists primarily of first editions, limited editions, translations, and other editions (many of them autographed or inscribed, 1965-1998) of the works of Anne Tyler, delineating her prolific career. Also includes books about or containing contributions by Tyler (1958-1993); issues of periodicals containing her contributions or reviews of her work (1965-1996); and three pieces of her original correspondence (1979-1989).

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This collection documents Price's career as a prolific and versatile author. Items include his works of fiction, books containing his contributions, books containing printed encomia, books entirely about Price, books and periodicals containing interviews with and/or articles about Price, books and periodicals formerly owned by Price, audio and video recordings, typescripts, letters, postcards, self-portraits, and photographs.

The addition (2001-0057) (90 items, 1.7 linear feet; dated 1955-2001) consists largely of books and printed material either written by or containing reference to or contributions from Price. Also includes his professional and personal correspondence, 1962-1990; a printer's proof, with editing marks, of Clear Pictures: First Loves, First Guides (1989); the original typescript of his senior honors thesis on John Milton (1955); and five self-portraits in various media.

Addition (2008-0082) (3 items, 2 lin. ft.; dated 1998 and undated) comprises one poster and two black-and-white photographs of Price. One photograph features Price and William Styron.

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The Jody Jones Hunter Collection of Works by William Styron includes first editions, limited editions, translations, and other editions, many of them autographed or inscribed, of the works of William Styron, along with published articles, correspondence, manuscripts, and related materials. The correspondence is chiefly letters written by Styron to Stuart Wright, the owner of Palaemon Press in Winston-Salem, N.C. and publisher of several limited editions of Styron's work. Also included with the collection is a carbon typescript of Confessions of Nat Turner, with holograph notes, and the original typescript of Styron's recipe for southern fried chicken from The Artist's and Writer's Cookbook (1961).

The addition (Accession 2001-0056) consists largely of books (mostly first editions, some signed or inscribed) and printed material written by or about Styron, or containing his contributions (1951-2001). Also includes editions of All the Finest Girls (2001), by Alexandra Styron (his youngest daughter); an original manuscript review of Sophie's Choice (1979) by Julian Symons; an original publisher's advertisement for The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967); an uncorrected proof of Admiral Robert Penn Warren and the Snows of Winter: A Tribute (1978?); and an original holograph manuscript of Styron's 1977 review of Philip Caputo's A Rumor of War (1977).

Addition (08-081)(5 items, .1 lin. ft.; undated) comprises a signed black-and-white photograph, and four pages of Styron's writing (two sheets are signed).

Addition (08-325)(4 items, .3 lin. ft.; dated 1982-1995 and undated) comprises two items of correspondence, a signed photograph, and an undated screenplay, SET THIS HOUSE ON FIRE.

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Wallace Kaufman papers, 1959-1994 1.5 Linear Feet — 700 Items

Author, teacher, naturalist, environmental activist, and World Bank consultant Wallace Vickers Kaufman was a 1961 graduate of Duke University's Trinity College majoring in English. Collection contains correspondene, reports, journals, and miscellaneous material relating primarily to Kaufman's environmental activism and as a real estate and entrepeneurial consultat. The collection also contains material documenting his friendship with Reynolds Price, a former instructor of Kaufman's at Duke, specifically correspondence, manuscripts, and several typescripts of Price's work.

The collection contains correspondence, writings and addresses, journals, reports, clippings and assorted print matter. Materials present primarily reflect Kaufman's environmental activism while residing in rural Chatham County, North Carolina and his consulting work with the World Bank and the International City/County Management Association in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc. Correspondence mostly documents Kaufman's role with the Conservation Council of North Carolina and the organization's collaboration with other local, regional, and national environmental organizations.

The journals and reports document Kaufman's work in former Soviet nations. They describe Kaufman's day to day activities in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Kazakhstan, and Poland that include descriptions of local customs and geographic regions, the difficulties and challenges inherent in transition from collectivism to privatization, and surveys of local businesses and manufactories. Also present in the collection is material documenting Kaufman's relationship with author Reynolds Price. This material includes mostly correspondence as well as several manuscripts and typescripts. The correspondence touches upon personal matters as well as professional including the activities of mutual friends and acquaintances, travels, and current works in progress.

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Collection comprises correspondence Will Inman sent to Steven Finch, an American poet and translator living in Switzerland, from 1984-1989. Letter topics include venues for poetry publication, Inman's reaction to poems Finch mailed, homosexuality and poetry, politics, poetry readings, American poets, recommended reading, retirement, gay fads and postures, and biographical details. Typescript copies of Inman's poems, writings on poetry, and short stories usually accompanied the letters.

Collection comprises correspondence Will Inman sent to Steven Finch, an American poet and translator living in Switzerland, from 1984-1989. Letter topics include venues for poetry publication, Inman's reaction to poems Finch mailed, homosexuality and poetry, politics, poetry readings, American poets, recommended reading, retirement, gay fads and postures, and biographical details. Typescript copies of Inman's poems, writings on poetry, and short stories usually accompanied the letters.

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Will Inman papers, 1910-2009 69.5 Linear Feet — 42,754 Items

The correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, and printed material in the Will Inman Papers span from 1939-1999, and serve to document the life and literary career of the poet, essayist, editor, educator, and publisher.

Inman was a prolific corespondent and maintained regular correspondent relationships with his friends and family, as well as with his readers and other editors and authors. He also regularly wrote to political and social figures during the 1960s. These letters to public and political figures express admiration and voice concerns about political events and social conditions. Inman protested in favor of civil rights, ending the war in Vietnam, and various environmental causes, and his letters reflect his thoughts and opinions on these subjects. Inman was also in regular contact with the editors and publishers of various literary magazines and the letters to these individuals document his efforts to publish his work. The collection holds many of Inman's out going correspondence as he regularly kept copies of his own letters.

Inman's copious diaries provide almost daily detail of his life from 1950-1994. In his diaries Inman recorded daily events, poetic inspirations, and his responses to world events. The diaries also include information about the poetry he is working on and several include typescripts of completed poems.

Inman also kept detailed records concerning his completed writings. He kept typescript copies of his poems and other writings, ordering them chronologically into notebooks, and recording publication information onto the typescripts. In organizing this collection, Inman's notebooks were discarded, but the typescripts maintain the order they held while bound in the notebooks, and serve to provide a chronological overview of Inman's published and unpublished writings.

This collection also contains copies of several of the anthologies and literary magazines where Inman published his work and several of the poetic monographs that Inman authored.

Inman regularly published his early work in newspapers in North Carolina. The collection contains clippings of these early published works as well as clippings of Inman's mid 1960's newspaper column "Conchsounds in the Hills."

There are also photographs of the McGirt family from ca. 1910, chiefly mounted in albums, as well as Inman's baby book from 1923. (16 accessions from 1998 and 1999) (35,475 items, 59 linear feet; dated 1910-1999)

The addition (accession #2001-0195) (1676 items, 2.7 linear feet; dated 1940-2001, bulk 1976-2001) comprises mainly personal correspondence to and from Inman and Jimmy Santiago Baca, 1971-1995, including typescript poetry. It also includes typescript poetry by Inman as Bill McGirt, 1940-1956; other poetry by Inman; professional correspondence; and a journal kept by Inman, 2000-2001.

The addition (accession #2002-0143) (2250 items, 3.60 linear feet; dated 1982-2001) consists primarily of incoming and outgoing personal correspondence. Topics include Inman's poems, publication work, and his political activites. There is also poetry and prose by Inman and others, and 20 black-and-white and 148 color photographs.

The addition (accession# 2003-0124 and 2003-0181)(2775 items, 3.6 linear feet; dated 1957-2003, bulk 1970-1989) contains published and unpublished typescript poetry written by Will Inman. Also includes literary newsletters, periodicals and brochures; a notebook containing poetry, biographical information and professional correspondence; and a paperweight.

Addition (2009-0263) (500 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1976-2009) includes correspondence, poetry by Inman and others, press releases and reviews, official documents (such as his birth certificate, insurance information, and medical documents), and materials from Inman's death and funeral.