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James Martin Bell papers, 1768-1870 and undated 15 Linear Feet — 40 boxes — 13,604 Items

Lawyer, political leader, ironmaster, railroad promoter, and banker, of Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. Correspondence and business papers reflecting the major part played by Bell and his family in the economic development of central Pennsylvania and other areas. Among the subjects dealt with are the building of internal improvements, the charcoal iron industry in the Juniata Valley, land titles and speculation, and early growth of the Pennsylvania Railroad under J. Edgar Thomson and others, tariff bills, the economic cycle of booms and depressions, the evolution of the monetary and banking system, telegraph companies, coal mining, Lake Superior copper mining, and Bell's active interest in Whig and Republican Party politics. Papers of the Civil War period illustrate the impact of the conflict on the business community in the North, and on the people of Pennsylvania during Confederate raids and invasions. Some papers relate to tests of Pennsylvania iron made at the Washington Navy Yard by Captain Dahlgren, to Bell's service as agent of Jay Cooke in floating Federal loans in Pennsylvania, and to the effect of the war on the banking system. Included are two early railroad broadsides from Bellefontaine and Indiana Railroad and Union Pacific Railroad (1856 and 1867).

Correspondence and business papers reflecting the major part played by Bell and his family in the economic development of central Pennsylvania and other areas. Among the subjects dealt with are the building of internal improvements, the charcoal iron industry in the Juniata Valley, land titles and speculation, and early growth of the Pennsylvania Railroad under J. Edgar Thomson and others, tariff bills, the economic cycle of booms and depressions, the evolution of the monetary and banking system, telegraph companies, coal mining, Lake Superior copper mining, and Bell's active interest in Whig and Republican Party politics. Papers of the Civil War period illustrate the impact of the conflict on the business community in the North, and on the people of Pennsylvania during Confederate raids and invasions. Some papers relate to tests of Pennsylvania iron made at the Washington Navy Yard by Captain Dahlgren, to Bell's service as agent of Jay Cooke in floating Federal loans in Pennsylvania, and to the effect of the war on the banking system. Included are two early railroad broadsides from Bellefontaine and Indiana Railroad and Union Pacific Railroad (1856 and 1867).

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Leonard Solomon Silk papers, 1929-1995 and undated, bulk 1950-1985 544.7 Linear Feet — Approx. 326,732 items

The papers of noted economist Leonard Silk span his entire career and include correspondence files; printed material such as periodicals and reports; research or subject files; newspaper clippings files; drafts of writings, including Silk's books, New York Times news columns, editorials, speeches, lectures, book reviews, and essays. There are also papers and reprints by Silk's colleagues; organizations files; publicity and informal photographs of Silk; financial documents; economic data; some teaching materials such as reading lists; and theses and dissertations (including Silk's own thesis on Swedish post-war housing, 1947). The collection also contains groups of cards, notes, memos, calendars and agendas. Silk's papers are a vast and rich resource for learning about the intersection of politics, economics, and popular opinion in the 20th century, U.S. fiscal policies, global economics, and specific topics as unemployment, inflation, banking, Keynesian economics, markets and marketing, the economies of Asian countries, and many other subjects. A more detailed original paper inventory is available in the library; in it significant portions of the correspondence are listed at the item level, including correspondents' names.

The papers of Leonard Silk span his entire career, and are arranged by original accessions, within which there are divisions by format,assembled by Silk. Most but not all accessions are described in this collection guide. The largest one is numbered 6096 and comprises over 80 large boxes.

There are many format divisions, and they typically include correspondence files; printed material such as periodicals and reports; research or subject files; newspaper clippings files; drafts of writings, including Silk's books, news columns, editorials, speeches, lectures, book reviews, and essays; papers and reprints by Silk's colleagues; organizations files; publicity and informal photographs of Silk and others; financial documents; economic data such as forecasts and tables, much of it reported by the U.S. government; some teaching materials such as reading lists; and theses and dissertations (including Silk's 1947 thesis on Swedish housing policies). There are also groups of cards, notes, memos, calendars and agendas, and some minutes of meetings relating to organizations with which Silk was involved.

Leonard Silk's papers are a vast and rich resource for learning about the intersection of politics, economics, and popular opinion in the 20th century. Specific topics include U.S. fiscal policies; global economics (starting with materials on post-World War II Europe); trends in social institutions in the U.S.; and other economic topics as American business, unemployment, inflation, banking, macroeconomics and Keynesian economics, markets and marketing (pharmaceutical and tobacco, among others), the economies of Asian countries such as Japan, and many other subjects.

A more detailed original paper inventory is available in the library; in it, significant portions of the correspondence are listed at the item level, including correspondents' names; separated book titles are also listed individually. Many groups of other materials, however, are described only by number of pieces.

In the correspondence files, many of them arranged in chronological order, the majority of the letters are addressed to Silk, but there are also some written by him. Significant correspondents include writers and journalists as well as well-known political figures and economists too numerous to mention. A search using key words may be helpful in locating particular individuals. Again, the original paper inventory contains the names of hundreds of individual correspondents.

The largest group of materials in the collection consists of print items. Silk assembled extensive research files of clippings, articles, periodicals, reports, government publications, and reprints. All of these supported his current research interests, which ranged widely but chiefly focused on macroeconomics, Keynesian economic theory, economics for the social good, and banking and finance. He also set aside pamphlets, tables and charts, and even maps related to his travels.

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Thomas Mayer was an American economist (1927-2015) known for his work in economic methodology and monetary policy. His papers include published works and drafts of his writings and research and a small amount of correspondence between him and other economists. A portion of this collection is born-digital material, which is not yet available for research.

The papers held in this collection consist largely of Mayer's writings, in both final and draft form, which span his professional career from the 1950s until the 2010s. There is a small amount of printed correspondence, including notable economists Milton Friedman, Roger Backhouse, and others. The bulk of the collection consists of born-digital materials, which contain both electronic drafts and email correspondence. As of January 2017, this material is not yet available for research. Contact Research Services with questions about accessing that portion of the collection.