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Collection consists of 60 small black-and-white photographs dating roughly from the 1930s to the 1950s, belonging to Amy Ashwood Garvey, feminist and activist who traveled extensively and lived in West Africa, where most if not all of these images originated. The majority of the images are portraits of Amy Ashwood Garvey's many male and female acquaintances in Africa, who include female friends, politicians, heads of states, lawyers, and students. Other subjects include locales and native inhabitants of Nigeria and other unidentified places; gatherings such as meetings, a funeral, and a public hanging; and street and market scenes. Although there are photographs with inscriptions, names, and descriptions of the scenes, the majority are unlabeled; the few dates that appear are from the late 1940s. The travel snapshots are likely to have been taken by Amy Ashwood Garvey, but there are images that were sent to her by individuals as mementos, and some images of her taken by another unidentified person. Acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Dating roughly from the 1930s to the 1950s, this collection of 60 small black-and-white photographs belonged to Amy Ashwood Garvey, feminist, activist for African and African American human rights, and first wife of Marcus Garvey. Most of the travel snapshots were likely to have been taken by her, but there are several that were clearly sent to her by individuals, and some that feature Amy Ashwood Garvey and were taken by another person. Although there are some photographs with inscriptions, names, and descriptions of the scenes, most are unlabeled; the few dates that appear are from the late 1940s.

Almost if not all the photographs were taken in Africa, where Garvey traveled and lived after her divorce with Marcus Garvey in 1922. Other locations may include Ghana and Benin. Personal subjects include portraits, candid and formal, of the many male and female friends and acquaintances of Amy Ashwood Garvey, including politicians and heads of state; and native inhabitants, including a portrait of a tribal chief with two women, probably his wives. Most are in Western dress, but some are in traditional clothing. Amy Ashwood Garvey appears in at least three of the prints, and there is a portrait of the President of Liberia, William Tubman, with whom she had a serious long-term relationship. Other images include street and market scenes; school groups; a parade, meetings and ceremonial visits; a public hanging; a funeral gathering; and views of river landings, probably the River Niger.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.