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Chief of Protocol and ambassador to Spain, Morocco, and Denmark under the Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter administrations; resident of New York, N.Y., Long Island, N.Y., and Washington, D.C. The collection chiefly consists of correspondence; scrapbooks and diaries; photographs; diplomatic papers; sound recordings and films; interviews, appointment books; clippings; printed material; and business papers, all documenting Angier Biddle Duke's life and career, especially his role in United States politics and diplomacy during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, as well as his philanthropic activities and his leadership roles in non-profit institutions. The materials also document the social and political activities of members of the Duke, Drexel, and Biddle families, and their residences in New York City and Long Island. In addition, the papers contain information on economic and social conditions in post-war Europe during Duke's ambassadorship to Spain, and information on Pakistani refugees and other international crises. Other topics include civil rights and desegregation (especially in Washington, DC).

The collection chiefly consists of correspondence; scrapbooks and diaries; photographs; diplomatic papers; sound recordings and films; interviews, appointment books; clippings; printed material; and business papers, all documenting Angier Biddle Duke's life and career, especially his role in United States politics and diplomacy during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, as well as his philanthropic activities and his leadership roles in non-profit institutions. The materials also document the social and political activities of members of the Duke, Drexel, and Biddle families, and their residences in New York City and Long Island. In addition, the papers contain information on economic and social conditions in post-war Europe during Duke's ambassadorship to Spain, and information on Pakistani refugees and other international crises. Other topics include civil rights and desegregation (especially in Washington, DC).

Details on Angier Biddle Duke's life as well as information on the Duke, Biddle, and Drexel families can be found in the Biographical Data Series. These materials include some of A.B. Duke's military records; articles on A.B. Duke; articles and biographical entries on A.B. Duke; "in memoriam" booklets from his first wife's funeral and the funeral of Angier Buchanan Duke, A.B. Duke's father; and genealogical materials on the families. Selected condolences out of the hundreds sent to Robin Chandler Duke after her husband's death in 1995 also reveal much about the personality and life of A.B. Duke. In addition, the narratives in the Diaries Series offer a great deal of material concerning the personalities of A.B. Duke and his family and acquaintances throughout his life.

The Correspondence Series also offers information on the Duke, Biddle, Semans, and Trent families, though correspondence between immediate family members makes up a small percentage of this large series. The correspondence files are most useful for the documentation they provide about A.B. Duke's career. Additional biographical data on A.B. Duke and family members, particularly useful for information on Robin Chandler Duke's social and political activities, can be found in the Clippings Series.

The Photograph Albums and Photographs Series contains hundreds of photographs of the Duke, Semans, and Biddle families. Some early photographs of Angier Biddle Duke were taken during his enlistment in the Army from 1940-1945. An album entitled "A celebration of the life of Benjamin Newton Duke, 1979" can be found in the Scrapbooks Series. Finally, as A.B. Duke served as president of the Duke Family Association of NC from 1988-1995, there are a number of items related to the meetings of this genealogical association found in the Correspondence Series.

Angier Biddle Duke was best known for his ambassadorial skills and his political acumen beginning with his appointment to the office of Ambassador to El Salvador in 1952 as the youngest ambassador ever appointed to a post. His subsequent career in diplomacy and politics, including his appointment as Chief of Protocol under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, is well-documented throughout the majority of the series. A series of written and taped diaries entitled the "Ambassador's Diary" are especially interesting for A.B. Duke's candid reflections on his experiences.

The political and social events of the 1960s and 1970s are well-represented in the papers in the multimedia formats associated with the Audio, Film, and Videotape Series, containing numerous recordings of speeches, toasts, and visits of foreign dignitaries; the Scrapbooks and Photograph Albums and Photographs Series, which hold many candid and formal photographs of politicians, diplomats, celebrities, and artists; and the Clippings Series. One scrapbook covers President Kennedy's trip to Berlin, West Germany; another oversize scrapbook covers an international incident at Palomares, Spain (1966): while Duke was that country's ambassador, an undetonated U.S. nuclear bomb was lost off the coast of Spain, then recovered after an increased international outcry against nuclear weapons. Materials in the Protocol Papers Series also concern Kennedy's assassination and the transition to a Johnson White House during the period when A.B. Duke was Chief of Protocol. As Jacqueline Kennedy had already become a good friend of A.B. Duke's family, there are items in the Correspondence Series reflecting her close relationship with them in the difficult years after her husband's assassination.

The head of the State Department Office of Protocol serves as principal adviser to the President and Secretary of State on matters of diplomatic procedures governed by law or international customs and practice. Angier Biddle Duke's responsibilities as Chief of Protocol from 1961-1965 and 1968, including his role in the arrangements for the Kennedy funeral, are best represented by materials in the Protocol Papers Series, arranged alphabetically by country, and by many valuable letters and telegrams in the Correspondence Series, and in the Writings and Speeches Series. In addition, a great deal of relevant information, both contemporary and retrospective in nature, can be found in the Interviews Series. Several important volumes in the Scrapbooks and Diaries Series are also were created as records of his tenure as Chief of Protocol, and the Pictures Series contains many candid and formal photographs during this period. Finally, events relating to the Office of Protocol are found in audio or film format in the Audio, Film, and Video Series. Memorabilia from this period such as invitations, dinner menus, guest lists, and souvenir programs from inaugurations abroad can also be found in the Miscellaneous Series.

A.B. Duke's extensive organizational activities in later decades are documented in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Interviews, Printed Materials, and Writings and Speeches Series. A large number of materials reflect A.B. Duke's long involvement in the administration of Long Island University as well as in other institutions such as the International Rescue Commission, various Democratic committees, CARE, the NYC Dept. of Civic Affairs and Public Events, the Spanish Institute, the Appeal to Conscience Foundation, the Japan-American Institute, the World Affairs Council, and the American Council of Ambassadors, and many others. The Subject Files and other series also illustrate A.B. Duke's later involvement in organizations attempting to establish more democratic structures in countries such as El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Guyana.

Some materials also reflect Robin Chandler Duke's later involvement in politics, including her unsuccessful bid for the Democratic nomination to fill Koch's congressional seat in 1978, and her role as chairwoman of Population Action International.

Although they contain relatively few documents, the Legal and Financial Papers provide some information on A.B. Duke's income and financial activities, and on the Doris Duke Trust; also in the legal papers is a publisher's contract for the biography of Doris Duke and a copy of Angier Buchanan Duke's will. Other legal and financial matters related to the Duke and Biddle families, particularly the Doris Duke estate (1995) are referred to on a regular basis in the Correspondence Series. Very little is to be found in the collection on the administration, maintenance, or acquisition of Angier Biddle Duke's residences in Washington, NYC, or Long Island, though some illustrations of residences can be found in the Clippings and Pictures Series.

Collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library which contain information relevant to the Angier Biddle Duke Papers include the James Buchanan Duke Papers and especially the Semans Family Papers. The Duke University Living History Program collection, also in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, contains an interview with Angier Biddle Duke recorded in the 1970s.

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Carl H. King papers, 1918-1973 and undated 14.5 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,000 Items

Methodist minister from Salisbury (Rowan Co.), N.C., King was executive secretary of the Methodist Board of Education of the Western North Carolina Conference, 1934-1967. His wife, Mary Eskridge King, was active in affairs of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and president of the Women's Society of Christian Service of the Western North Carolina Conference, 1960-1964. The papers of Carl Howie King and of Mary Eskridge King span the dates 1918-1973, and document aspects of Methodism and politics and social movements in North Carolina during the later 20th century. Types of materials chiefly consist of correspondence, meeting and conference files, and biographical material on Carl and Mary King. Mary King's papers form the majority of the collection and document her extensive involvement in the Methodist Church and its organizations; topics of interest include Christian education, political conservatism and the John Birch Society, the Civil Rights movement, prayer in schools, the Vietnam War, student unrest, and communism. Carl King's papers include correspondence, writings, and notes from his student days at Trinity College, now Duke University, and Yale University.

The papers of Carl Howie King and of Mary Eskridge King span the dates 1918-1973 and document aspects of Methodism and politics and social movements in North Carolina during the later part of the 20th century. C. H. King was executive secretary of the Methodist Board of Education of the Western North Carolina Conference, 1934-1967. His papers, housed in the Carl King Papers and Writings Series, consist principally of letters from people to whom he had sent copies of his pamphlet, "Historical Highlights of the Educational Ministry." Also present are materials from his student days at Trinity College (now Duke University), Durham, N.C., and Yale. Mary Eskridge King was active in affairs of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and president of the Women’s Society of Christian Service of the Western North Carolina Conference, 1960-1964. Her papers, in the Mary Eskridge King Series which forms the majority of the collection, concern her activities in Methodist affairs on the local, regional, and national level, as president of the Women’s Society of Christian Service, and her service on various other church boards and special committees. Topics of interest in her papers include Methodism and public affairs, including political conservatism and the John Birch Society, the Civil Rights movement, prayer in schools, the Vietnam War, student unrest, and communism.

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Center for Documentary Studies, SNCC Legacy Project Critical Oral Histories Conference Interviews, 2016-2018, 2016-2018 260 Files — MP4 video files, JPEG image files, MP3 audio files, PDF text files, and plain text files. — 75 Gigabytes

Digital videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting critical oral history conferences in 2016 and 2018, with Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee veterans, hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The 2016 Critical Oral Histories Conference focused on "The Emergence of Black Power, 1964-1967," while the 2018 Critical Oral Histories Conference focused on the efforts directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Digital videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting critical oral history conferences in 2016 and 2018, with Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee veterans, hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The Critical Oral Histories Conference in 2016 and 2018 were an extension of the SNCC Legacy Project that placed SNCC veterans in conversation with scholars using primary source materials. The events were produced by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and the SNCC Legacy Project. Series One contains the 2016 Conference interviews, in which narrators focused on the years 1964-1967, to discuss the emergence of "Black Power" as an ideological concept as well as political and economic framework. Participants included Charlie Cobb, Courtland Cox, Gloria House, Phil Hutchings, Jen Lawson, Charles McLaurin, Cleve Sellers, Shirley Sherrod, Karen Spellman, Judy Richardson, Maria Varela, Geri Augusto, Emilye Crosby, Worth Long, Hasan Jeffries, Betty Mae Fikes, Bertha O'Neal, John O'Neal, Michael Simmons, and Zoharah Simmons. Series Two contains the 2018 Conference interviews, in which narrators focused on the efforts directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965, with participants including Phillip Agnew, Geri Augusto, Rebecah Barber, Kenneth A. Campbell, Charles Cobb, Courtland Cox, Emilye Crosby, Amber Delgado, David (Dave) Dennis, Sr., Ajamu Dillahunt, Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Timothy (Tim) L. Jenkins, Edwin King, Dorie Ann Ladner, Jennifer Lawson, Danita Mason-Hogans, Miles McKeller-Smith, Charles McLaurin, Ambria McNeill, Aja Monet Bacquie, Janet Moses, Robert Moses, Edna Watkins Muhammad, Quinn Osment, Timothy B. Tyson, Hollis Watkins, and Curtis Wilkie.

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Several hundred letters and petitions, dated February-March 1960, from citizens of Greensboro, N.C. to Chairman Edward Raymond Zane and other members of the Advisory Committee on Community Relations, expressing support for or opposition to integrated seating at the Woolworth and Kress lunch counters in the wake of the Greensboro sit-in demonstrations of early February 1960.

Collection contains several hundred letters and petitions from citizens of Greensboro expressing support for or opposition to integrated seating at the city's lunch counters, specifically at Woolworth's and Kress.

The letters, dated February-March 1960, are chiefly addressed to Zane as Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Community Relations in Greensboro or to Mayor George Roach and other members of the Advisory Committee. As Chairman of the Advisory Committee, Zane wrote an article in the Greensboro Daily News in the wake of the sit-ins soliciting the opinions of Greensboro citizens concerning the integration of lunch counters at Woolworth's and Kress.

Zane asked citizens to consider five alternatives to the situation: 1) "The situation to remain as it is," 2) "The two establishments to remove seats and serve everyone standing," 3) "The two establishments to serve everyone seated," 4) "The two establishments to reserve separate areas for seated white people and seated Negroes," and 5) "The two establishments to discontinue serving food."

Letters from both whites and African Americans offer support or opposition to Zane's alternatives and document sentiment regarding race relations in the community.

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Florence Tate (1931-2014) was a civil rights and pan-African activist based in Washington, DC. Involved in activism in support of Angolan independence, she later worked in support of the UNITA faction in the Angolan Civil War. In the United States, she worked as a press secretary for the first mayoral administration of Marion Barry and subsequently for the 1984 presidential campaign of Jesse Jackson.

The largest series, African Politics, contains material from Tate's activism in support of the Southwestern African nation of Angola. As an organizer of several groups which sought to connect Angolans with African Americans, this series features correspondence, official communiques with the UNITA leadership, government documents, and clippings from African newspapers and journals.

The U.S. Politics series highlights Tate's role as a press secretary for both Mayor Marion Barry and Senator Jesse Jackson, during the latter's 1984 presidential campaign. Of particular importance is her role in organizing and documenting Jackson's 1984 mission to Syria to free downed Navy pilot Robert O. Goodman, shot down by Syrian forces over Lebanon during the height of the Lebanese Civil War.

The Name and Subject series is based on material related to organizations that Tate created and lead. She collected materials related to Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael) and Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin (H. Rap Brown), among others. There is also information collected related to Southern African nations of Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The Personal Materials series features correspondence, photographs, and articles written by Florence Tate. It highlights her career as a journalist in Dayton, Ohio during the mid-1960s, when she was active with local CORE and SNCC organizations.

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Dr. Jim D. Hunt was a Professor of Ethics and Religion at Shaw University in Raleigh, NC for almost 30 years. He studied the philosophy of Mohandas K. Gandhi and published several authoritative books on Gandhi, satyagraha, civil rights and peace. The Jim Hunt Papers span the years 1950s-2000s and document Hunt's academic career as a Professor of Religion and his personal life as an activist for social changes. Items in the collection include research materials, correspondence, writings by and about Dr. Hunt, manuscripts, clippings, printed materials, notebooks, information and multimedia packets, photographs, slides, videos and sound recordings, as well as a few artifacts.

The Jim Hunt Papers span the years 1950s-2000s and document Hunt's academic career as a Professor of Religion and his personal life as an activist for social changes. Items in the collection include research materials, correspondence, writings by and about Dr. Hunt, manuscripts, clippings, printed materials, notebooks, information and multimedia packets, photographs, slides, videos and sound recordings, as well as a few artifacts.

The Research/Subject Files series contains research materials on India and South Africa, writings about Mahatma Gandhi and Martin L. King, book reviews, manuscripts, subject files, photos, and academic papers by Dr. Hunt and others.

The Correspondence series includes personal and professional correspondence received and sent by Dr. Hunt throughout his adult life.

Most of the maps in the Maps series were drawn or collected by Jim Hunt. The bulk of the series was from either India or South Africa.

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Judy Richardson is a veteran of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who worked in Mississippi during the Mississippi Freedom Summer Project in 1964. She later worked with Blackside, Inc., on the Eyes on the Prize civil rights documentary series, and co-edited Hands on the Freedom Plow, about women's experiences in SNCC. Her papers include materials from her years working on staff at SNCC in Atlanta and Mississippi; her involvement with the Drum and Spear Bookstore in Washington D.C.; extensive print and audiovisual materials from her work in documentary film, including projects like Malcolm X: Make It Plain, Eyes on the Prize, and Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre; her correspondence and drafts from the editing of Hands on the Freedom Plow; project and event files from numerous committees, speaking engagements, and panels; personal files, including her FOIA about her SNCC service in the 1960s; and subject files collected from various projects.

The Judy Richardson Papers include materials from her years working on staff at SNCC in Atlanta and Mississippi; her involvement with the Drum and Spear Bookstore in Washington D.C.; extensive print and audiovisual materials from her work in documentary film, including projects like Malcolm X: Make It Plain, Eyes on the Prize, and Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre; her correspondence and drafts from the editing of Hands on the Freedom Plow; project and event files from numerous committees, speaking engagements, and panels; personal files, including her FOIA about her SNCC service in the 1960s; and subject files collected from various projects.

Materials are arranged into series based on format and topic. The Hands on the Freedom Plow Series is closed until 2020. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use.

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Milo Guthrie papers, 1962-1987 20.2 Linear Feet — circa 15,150 Items

The Milo Guthrie Papers consist mainly of periodicals and printed materials produced by American politically left organizations and document a range of issues including civil rights, feminism, environmental defense, nuclear freeze and disarmament, gay and lesbian rights, Latin American and Puerto Rican politics, labor issues, and various political parties and candidates, particularly the Socialist Party. Included is a small amount of original material, primarily correspondence with members of various organizations concerning support for issues and activities. Much of this is directly related to the political campaigns of independent party candidates as well as Guthrie's own political campaigns in Tennessee in 1982 and 1984.

While the collection provides a concentrated wealth of information on a wide range of political and social issues during a time of significant political activity from the left, there is relatively little documentation of Guthrie's involvement with most of the groups represented in the collection's periodicals and printed materials. Scattered notes on flyers and form letters show that he was involved in several groups to some extent. However, it is not clear at this point if the bulk of the materials in this collection contain examples of his graphics, demonstrate the range of his political activities, reflect a passive interest in various issues and organizations, or a combination of these.

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Patricia Murphy Derian papers, 1962-2008 and undated 15.3 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,175 Items

Patricia Murphy Derian is an activist, organizer, researcher, and served as the first Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA), a bureau of the executive branch created in 1977 during the Carter Administration. The papers of Patricia M. Derian cover the years 1962-2007 and document Derian's involvement and interventions concerning international human rights, and to a lesser extent, civil liberties and women's rights. The collection comprises Derian's personal notes; correspondence with state officials, friends and human rights activists; unclassified State Department documents; reports; interviews; memorabilia; and news clippings. These and other materials provide valuable insights to the history of human rights activism and major cases of human rights violations from the early 1970s up to the second term of the George W. Bush administration. The scope of Derian's papers is extensive, covering the history of human rights movements and national policies and politics since the early 1970s in Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Topics include U.S. foreign and military policies, repercussions of those policies, and disappearances, torture and other forms of violation of human rights. Derian's papers include subject files on Argentina, El Salvador, Chile, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, South Korea, Vietnam, and Middle Eastern countries, as well as smaller files on sixteen other countries. Many of these country files cover several decades of information and analysis. Especially significant are documents concerning U.S.-El Salvador and U.S.-Argentina relations during the 1970s and 1980s. Other topics in the collection include women's rights, women in public office, and civil rights movements in the U.S., especially in Mississippi. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The Patricia Murphy Derian papers cover the years 1962-2008 and document Derian's involvement and interventions concerning human rights and civil liberties in the U.S. and worldwide. Derian was an activist, organizer, researcher, and served as the first Assistant Secretary of State for Bureau for Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA), created in 1977 by President Jimmy Carter. The collection comprises Derian's personal notes; correspondence with state officials, friends and human rights activists; unclassified State Department documents; reports; travel information; posters (located in the Oversize Material); interviews (both audio-visual and printed); memorabilia; and news clippings. These and other materials provide valuable insights into the history of human rights activism and major cases of human rights violations from the early 1970s up to the second term of the George W. Bush administration. The collection is arranged into five series: Carter Administration - 1980 Campaign and Employment, Department of State Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA) Bureau, Post-Carter Administration Human Rights Work, Countries, and Audiovisual Material. A final group houses oversize material. The scope of Derian's papers is extensive, covering the history of human rights movements and national policies and politics since the early 1970s in Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. U.S. foreign and military policies, repercussions of those policies, and documentation of disappearances, torture and other forms of violation of human rights are documented extensively in the Department of State Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA) Bureau Series, and in the large Countries Series, which brings together Derian's files on Argentina, El Salvador, Chile, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, South Korea, Vietnam, and Middle Eastern countries, as well as a grouping on sixteen other countries. Many of these country files cover several decades of information and analysis. Especially significant are documents concerning U.S.-El Salvador and U.S.-Argentina relations during the 1970s and 1980s. Other topics in the collection include women's rights, women in public office, civil liberties in the U.S., and the human rights work of foundations such as the Carter-Menil Human Rights Foundation and Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Foundation.

The Carter Administration - 1980 Carter-Mondale Campaign and Employment series includes materials concerning the organization of the 1980 Carter-Mondale election campaign; it also documents employment procedures for Derian's position at the White House.

The Post-Carter Administration Human Rights Work series is arranged into five subseries. The Human Rights Organizations subseries documents Derian's post-Carter administration human rights work in connection with various organizations, NGO's and research institutes. The Symposia and Conferences subseries comprises programs, proceedings, and papers presented at conferences and symposia attended by Derian. The General Files subseries contains subject files assembled by Derian that address broad human rights matters, including some materials on civil rights movement in Mississippi, human rights during the Reagan administration, and human rights violations around the world, including torture, murder, and kidnappings. The Prizes and Awards subseries covers the materials concerning Derian's work on committees of various foundations advocating the improvement of human rights conditions worldwide. The Miscellaneous Files subseries contains materials such as articles, dissertation monographs, reports, correspondence, political posters, and news clippings which refer to diverse issues such as humans rights and the Bush administration, the women's rights movement, U.S. foreign policy, and evaluation of the political and human rights situation in various Latin American countries.

Recordings of Patricia Derian's public speeches, interviews and excerpts from political protests in Argentina are housed in the Audiovisual Series. The Oversized Material grouping houses large items removed from files throughout the collection. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Thomas Cripps papers, 1839-2009 and undated bulk 1940s-2009 98 Linear Feet — Approximately 62,475 Items

Retired professor of history at Morgan State University, scholar of the history of African Americans in the motion picture industry, prolific author of books and articles on the subject, and script writer. The papers of Thomas Cripps date from 1839 to 2009, and are arranged into three divisions: films, photographic stills of African American actors and productions, and professional papers, the largest group. Taken as a whole, the films, movie stills, research files, and publication files document Cripps's investigations into representations of racial and ethnic stereotypes in popular culture, particularly in film, but also touch on other issues such as gender in popular culture, portrayal of race in Nazi Germany, and the social dimensions of African American life in the U.S. during the 20th century. Other materials stem from college-level courses taught by Cripps on these same topics, and include many of the visual resources he used in his classes. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Thomas Cripps collection dates from approximately 1839 to 2009, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1940-2009, and is arranged into three main divisions: films, photographic stills of African American actors and productions, and professional papers, which is the largest group of the three (closed pending processing). The materials as a whole can be used to study a variety of themes and subjects: racial or ethnic stereotypes in popular culture (chiefly African American, but also Jewish, Irish, and Asian); American and European television culture, broadcasting, and advertising; African American artists; African American film-makers, most notably Oscar Micheaux; U.S. political and social events in the 20th century, including the Depression and the Civil Rights Movement; educational institutions for African Americans; and the teaching of African American history in U.S. higher education. There are significant research materials on Nazi Germany propaganda and the portrayal of race in the party's films.

The thirty-seven films found in the Films Series consist of film shorts, clips from feature films, newsreels, "Soundies," and television commercials, and were collected by Cripps for their portrayals of African Americans, performance by African Americans, or production by African Americans from the turn of the century into the late 1960s 1970s. He also collected filmic materials reflecting other racial and ethnic stereotypes, as seen in the Ethnic Films reel. There are viewing copies for all films.

The Still Photographs Series consists of hundreds of publicity stills and other images taken from U.S. and British feature films featuring African American actors from the silent film era through the 1970s. Many entries, which have been retained from the original envelope labels, carry titles from individual films, but other prints were arranged by Cripps into topical categories such as "Black Athletes," "Jungle Pix," "Silent Films," and "Exotic Primitives."

Cripps's professional papers, a very large group, are closed to access pending processing. They are currently loosely arranged into these series: Correspondence, Dissertation and Research, Morgan State University, Other Papers and AV Materials, Subject Files, and Writings. Beyond the topics discussed above, the materials also document grant proposals written by Cripps; his early dissertation work; coursework in a variety of settings; and his many publication projects.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.