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Arlin Turner papers, 1927-1980 15.6 Linear Feet — circa 9750 Items

The papers span Turner's career as a scholar of American literature, from his undergraduate education at West Texas State University in 1927 to his death in 1980, when he was an instructor at Southwest Texas State University. Comprised primarily of personal and professional correspondence with scholars and publishers of American literature, including Gay Wilson Allen, John Q. Anderson, Louis Budd, Robert Cantwell, James B. Colvert, Eddie Gay Cone, Benjamin Franklin Fisher, Albert Mordell, Norman Holmes Pearson, William Stafford, and Edmund Wilson. There are also letters, printed matter, reports, and minutes that Turner collected as a member or officer of organizations, including the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association, Committee for American Studies, and the Associated Research Council. The Turner Papers also document the development of high school, collegiate, and graduate level instruction in American literature through the organizational records and course materials, the latter of which include Turner's personal writings and research notes, subject files, clippings, lecture notes, and other printed materials on various authors or genres of American literature, including Southern literature, American humor, Nathaniel Hawthorne and George Washington Cable.

The Arlin Turner Papers, 1927-1980, span Turner's entire career as a scholar of American literature, from his undergraduate education at West Texas State University in 1927 to his death in 1980, when he was an instructor at Southwest Texas State University. The Turner Papers are comprised primarily of personal and professional correspondence with scholars and publishers of American literature. The correspondence includes letters, printed matter, reports, and minutes that Turner collected as a member or officer of organizations to which many of these literary scholars belonged. These materials, in addition to the clippings, printed materials and other writings Turner collected, provide insight into the development of the profession of American literary scholarship in the 1920s and 1930s; demonstrate the major concerns, issues, conflicts, and interests of its practitioners over the following four decades; and record research advancements and contributions to scholarship on the literary figures of most interest to Turner. The Turner Papers also document the development of high school, collegiate, and graduate level instruction in American literature through the organizational records and course materials, the latter of which include Turner's personal writings and research notes, subject files he collected, clippings, lecture notes, and other printed materials on various authors or genres of American literature. Finally, this collection provides glimpses into Turner's personal career and scholarly thought through the writings which are included, both those he presented orally as speeches or lectures, or those he published as articles or books. The Turner Papers are organized into five series: Correspondence, Course Materials, Organizations, Printed Material, and Writings and Speeches.

A student of the first generation of American literature scholars in the 1920s, Turner played an important role in the network of scholarly exchange that was vital to the emergence of the discipline in the decades following. Turner kept in contact with numerous colleagues in colleges and universities across the United States and throughout the world, including many former graduate students who later became influential literary scholars and critics themselves. The Correspondence Series, 1930-1980, documents Turner's role in this network of scholarly exchange. The Individuals Subseries, 1930-1980, includes Turner's most voluminous correspondents: American literature specialists and authors Gay Wilson Allen, John Q. Anderson, Louis Budd, Robert Cantwell, James B. Colvert, Eddie Gay Cone, Benjamin Franklin Fisher, Albert Mordell, Norman Holmes Pearson, William Stafford, and Edmund Wilson. The Publications Subseries, 1934-1979, contains portions of Turner's communications with editors, publishers, and presses primarily regarding article reviews or manuscript evaluations of others' work. This subseries also contains some information concerning Turner's own articles, manuscripts, and various published works. Correspondence, brochures, press releases, reports, and contractual information concerning Turner's speaking engagements or attendance at professional meetings is collected in the Conferences, Speeches, and Lectures Subseries, 1961-1978 (bulk 1961-1964). Miscellaneous materials comprised primarily of letters arranged by subject are assembled in the Other Correspondence Subseries, 1948-1979 and undated This subseries also contains research notes, memos, and printed material. These papers document Turner's visiting professor appointments and awards, as well as his interest in topics such as the Duke University Library, the Huntington Library, George W. Cable primary sources, and international scholars of American Literature.

The Course Materials Series, undated, is comprised of information Turner collected to aid in composing classroom lectures, and other teaching materials. He maintained an extensive set of files on American authors, which can be found in the Lecture Notes, By Author Subseries, undated Most files contain a brief biography of the author and list of his major compositions, but may also include copies of their works, a typescript of Turner's lecture on the author, and related materials such as clippings or Turner's handwritten research notes. Turner also collected files on genres of literature, delineated both by region, such as Louisiana or British literature, or by style, such as Short Stories or Recent Fiction. These can be found in the Lecture Notes, By Subject Subseries, undated The Class Files Subseries, undated, contains Turner's teaching materials including syllabi, quizes, and exams. These files pertain to courses Turner taught (or in a few early instances, took) in subjects including American Literature before the Civil War, Post-Civil War Literature, Hawthorne and Melville, American Humor, and Southern Literature. Specific course numbers and titles have been provided wherever possible.

Arlin Turner was an active leader and participant in many of the organizations associated with his profession and interests, which are chronicled in the Organizations Series, 1929-1979 (bulk 1936-1979). These scholarly groups developed policies, conducted studies, and otherwise governed the profession. Thus, Turner's influential positions in most of these associations render his thorough collection of organizational records both valuable and useful. Folders in this series primarily contain correspondence, minutes, memoranda, reports, and printed matter such as newsletters, brochures, and clippings. Most notable is Turner's work with the Modern Language Association (MLA), whose American Literature Section members are primarily responsible for the spread of American Studies programs across the globe. Turner's records also document his work with the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA), the American Studies Association (ASA), and the Southeastern American Studies Association (SEASA). This series likewise chronicles Turner's leadership roles in the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Turner was also a member of the Committee for American Studies, the advisory group for the Conference Board of Associated Research Councils' (CBC) Committee for International Exchange of Persons (CIEP). The Organizations Series also includes files on the selection of Fulbright Scholars that he collected as a member of that committee. In addition, Turner served as chairman of this committee during the period in which the "Loewenberg controversy" consumed the CIEP's affairs. When Prof. Bert J. Loewenberg was denied a Fulbright Award in 1959 despite the committee's recommendation, its members threatened to resign in protest against allegations that Loewenberg's past political activity was to blame. Thus, significant amounts of correspondence from fellow committee members Ray Billington, John Hope Franklin, Harvey Wish, and Charles Barker regarding the controversy is found in this series.

Arlin Turner accumulated a significant number of clippings, newsletters, pamphlets, reprints, and publications related to American Literature. These are collected in the Printed Material Series, undated Included in this series are materials from the Educational Testing Service (ETS), memorabilia from Turner's time at the University of Hull in England, literary magazines, and miscellaneous clippings primarily regarding Southern writers (especially North Carolina authors), William Faulkner, and the New Critics (a.k.a. The Fugitives).

The Writings and Speeches Series, 1938-1980 and undated (bulk 1964-1977), contains copies of Turner's significant oral presentations and other written work, both published and unpublished, in addition to some writings of other authors he accumulated. Files from Turner's speaking engagements include both correspondence and typed copies of his presentations. This series also contains unidentified speech notes and writings, in addition to a bound typescript with handwritten edits of Turner's Nathaniel Hawthorne: A biography . Writings about Turner, including obituaries, tributes, his curriculum vita and the like, are also found in the Writings and Speeches Series.

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Benjamin Franklin Fisher papers, 1963-2001, bulk 1967-2001 1.6 Linear Feet — circa 1006 Items

The papers of Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV, an American literature scholar, editor, and teacher, span the years 1963 to 2001, with the bulk dated from 1963 to 2001. The Fisher Papers consist of correspondence and printed materials that primarily document Fisher's and his Duke University advisors' educational and career trajectories. These materials also provide insight into various scholars' recent contributions to Poe studies, as well as information on the general activities of, and Fisher's leadership roles in, several of the professional organizations of which Fisher was a member. These organizations especially include those devoted to the study of Edgar Allan Poe.

The Correspondence Series, 1963-2001 (bulk 1967-2001) consists of letters between Fisher and other scholars of American literature from 1963 to 2001, with the bulk dated 1967-2001. Much of the correspondence mingles professional exchanges with personal inquiries and salutations. Included are many of the prominent names in Edgar Allan Poe scholarship, including Richard Benton, David K. Jackson, Burton Pollin, Richard Kopley, Alexander G. Rose, and G. R. "Dick" Thompson. The collection also contains Fisher's correspondence with Duke faculty members Arlin Turner, Clarence Gohdes, and Jay B. Hubbell, beginning in Fisher's graduate student years and continuing until their deaths. Much of Fisher's correspondence includes manuscript evaluations, both casually for colleagues and professionally for publishers or editors. Also included are Fisher's files regarding conferences, especially records of the Edgar Allan Poe Society's Annual Speakers Series, for which Fisher served as chairman. Much of the correspondence with individuals provides information on the activities of this and other organizations to which Fisher belonged, especially the Poe Studies Association. A significant portion of correspondence from 1999 to 2001 is print-outs of electronic mail.

The Printed Material Series, 1978-1982 includes a copy of the April/June 1978 issue of Serials Review, which features a history of American Literature, a journal published at Duke. The article praises AL's three editors Jay B. Hubbell, Arlin Turner, and Clarence Gohdes, who also served as Fisher's mentors at Duke. Tributes to Turner can also be found in the 1981 issue of South Atlantic Quarterly and in the first of two volumes of University of Mississippi Studies in English (USME) found in this collection. In addition to Fisher's tribute to Turner, the first volume of USME also contains Fisher's review of Turner's 1980 book Nathaniel Hawthorne: A Biography. Volume 3 (1982) of the UMSE is entitled "Poe-purri," and includes Fisher's essay "A Ten-Year Shelf of Poe Books." This series also includes two 1982 Edgar Allan Poe Society publications written by Alexander Rose, who had served as the organization's president from 1969-1976. The first volume, History of the Edgar Allan Poe Society, is largely in narrative form. It is accompanied by a second volume of minutes and annual reports from which the history was drawn.

This collection is part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography. Related materials may be found in other Hubbell Center collections, including the Jay B. Hubbell Papers, Arlin Turner Papers, Clarence Gohdes Papers, Poe Studies Association Records, and the Modern Language Association, American Literature Section Papers.

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Boatman Family papers, 1901-1981 and undated 72 Linear Feet — 8620 Items

Methodist educators and family members from Kentucky and Alabama. The Boatman Family Papers span the years 1901-1981; the majority of the papers were generated by the Rev. Dr. Conway and Mrs. Caroline Boatman, Methodist educators from Kentucky. The collection is arranged in series by family member and institution, the most substantial series being the Conway and Caroline Boatman Series; the John Paul Boatman Series; and the Union College Series. Other smaller groups pertain to other family members. Family correspondence makes up the majority of the collection, but there are also scrapbooks; educational records (primarily financial); many photographs of Union College in Barbourville, Kentucky; and clippings and other printed items. Topics covered by the correspondence in the Conway and Caroline's papers cover their courtship (1909-1919); the Methodist Episcopal mission in Jubbulpore, India (1919-1923); and India Methodist Theological College (1923-1925). There are also many references to the three institutions where Dr. Boatman served as President - Iowa National Bible Training School (1928-1931), Snead College in Boaz, Ala., and College of Barbourville, Ky. (1939-1959). Fund-raising, especially during the Depression, is a commonly recurring theme. Other letters from sons of the Boatmans refer to their college years from the 1930s-1940s. Institutions referred to here include Drew University, University of Kentucky in Lexington, and Southwestern College in Kansas.

The Boatman Family Papers span the years 1901-1981; the majority of the papers were generated by the Rev. Dr. Conway and Mrs. Caroline Boatman, Methodist educators from Kentucky. The collection is arranged in series by family member and institution, the most substantial series being the Conway and Caroline Boatman Series; the John Paul Boatman Series; and the Union College Series. Other smaller groups pertain to other family members. Family correspondence makes up the majority of the collection, but there are also scrapbooks; educational records (primarily financial); many photographs of Union College in Barbourville, Kentucky; and clippings and other printed items. Topics covered by the correspondence in the Conway and Caroline's papers cover their courtship (1909-1919); the Methodist Episcopal mission in Jubbulpore, India (1919-1923); and India Methodist Theological College (1923-1925). There are also many references to the three institutions where Dr. Boatman served as President - Iowa National Bible Training School (1928-1931), Snead College in Boaz, Ala., and College of Barbourville, Ky. (1939-1959). Fund-raising, especially during the Depression, is a commonly recurring theme. Other letters from sons of the Boatmans refer to their college years from the 1930s-1940s. Institutions referred to here include Drew University, University of Kentucky in Lexington, and Southwestern College in Kansas.

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Charles A. Ellwood papers, 1889-1946 6.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Charles Abram Ellwood (1873-1946) established the Department of Sociology at Duke University in 1930, retiring in 1944. The papers feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at Missouri and Duke. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

The papers of sociologist Charles A. Ellwood feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at University of Missouri--Columbia and Duke University. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

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Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes papers, 1811-1990s and undated, bulk 1905-1981, bulk 1905-1981 6.2 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — Approximately 4650 items — 4650 Items

Collection consists of research materials, correspondence, writings, clippings and other printed materials, and a few photographs, mainly from the latter half of Gohdes's career. The earliest date (1811) refers to reproductions of original research materials. Correspondence with other American Literature teachers and authors, combined with other materials relating to Gohdes's institutional and organizational affiliations, in particular with Duke University, the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the journal AMERICAN LITERATURE, comprise the most substantive aspects of this collection. They provide insight into American literary scholarship in the early and mid-twentieth century. Noted authors and scholars of the time whose letters and other writings are in the collection include Alexander Blackburn, Oscar Cargill, Lewis Chase, Robert Elias, Norman Foerster, Arthur Rubin, Arthur Quinn, and Upton Sinclair. Original manuscripts by Gohdes, inscribed reprints of writings by his colleagues, and materials relating to many major British and American literary figures, make up the rest of the collection. There is substantial material on Edgar Allen Poe and American humor. The collection also includes papers documenting Gohdes's research and writing for his last book project, a history of the muscadine grape in North Carolina entitled Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography

The Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes Papers date from 1811 to the 1990s, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1905 to 1981. Collection consists of research materials, correspondence, writings, clippings and other printed materials, and a few photographs, mainly from the latter half of Gohdes's career. The earliest date (1811) refers to reproductions of original materials used in his research. Correspondence with other American Literature teachers and authors, combined with other materials relating to Gohdes's institutional and organizational affiliations, in particular with Duke University, the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the journal AMERICAN LITERATURE, comprise the most substantive aspects of this collection. They provide insight into the bureaucratic and institutional exigencies of American literary scholarship in the early and mid-twentieth century. Noted authors and scholars of the time whose letters and other writings are in the collection include Alexander Blackburn, Oscar Cargill, Lewis Chase, Robert Elias, Norman Foerster, Arthur Rubin, Arthur Quinn, and Upton Sinclair. Original manuscripts by Gohdes, inscribed reprints of writings by his colleagues, and materials relating to many major British and American literary figures, make up the rest of the collection. There is substantial material on Edgar Allen Poe and American humor. The collection also includes papers documenting Gohdes's research and writing for his last book project, a history of the muscadine grape entitled Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines.

The Gohdes Papers are divided into seven series: Biographical Data, Correspondence, Author Files, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, Scuppernong , and Clippings.

The Biographical Data Series briefly sketches the major events of Gohdes's life. It consists of only a few items, including a one-page sketch by Gohdes of his career's highlights, and photocopies of Gohdes's obituaries. Further biographical information, especially pertaining to Gohdes's academic life, can be culled from materials in the Correspondence Series.

The Correspondence Series contains letters exchanged with university administrators, publishers, colleagues, librarians, and literary figures. The series is divided into four subseries, American Literature , Lewis Chase, Duke University, and General. The bulk of the correspondence concerns professional and academic affairs, such as appointments, editorships, research and reviews, and publishing. Included are exchanges between Gohdes and Duke University administrators about English Department and American Literature affairs, as well as between Gohdes and contemporary literary critics about the study of American literature. There are also several documents that illuminate Gohdes's political affiliations and social concerns.

Materials on approximately fifty authors, largely major British and American writers, are in the Author Files Series and were originally gathered by Gohdes and his colleague, Lewis Chase. The folders contain a variety of information on the represented authors, in an equally varied mix of formats: clippings, notes, lectures, student papers, photographs, and reproductions or photocopies of original writing.

Included in the Subject Files Series are materials relating to several projects and interests which engaged Gohdes during his career. These include: bibliographies, poetry, travel narratives and the American West, and the United Nations' Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)/American Literature Section's Best American Books List. The bibliographies collected in this series reflect Gohdes's interest in this genre, as he participated in and edited many such projects throughout his career.

The Writings and Speeches Series contains manuscript and printed materials in two subseries: Writings by Gohdes and Writings by Others. The Writings by Gohdes Subseries includes manuscripts of short stories, poetry, and academic essays, as well as notes and notecards. The manuscripts also contain folders pertaining to unfinished projects and writings. The Writings by Gohdes Subseries also contains several folders of printed materials, consisting of reprints and reproductions of as well as advertising and promotional materials for Gohdes's published writings. This subseries consists almost entirely of reprints that are inscribed to Gohdes by the authors.

Materials relating to the writing and research of Gohdes's last published book, Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines, are in the Scuppernong Series. Three subseries make up this series: Correspondence, Research and Notes, and Publication Materials. Correspondence plus photocopied articles and essays about the grape and agricultural production form the bulk of the series. Also included are Gohdes's many notes and notecards, as well as reviews and materials relating to the book's publication.

The Clippings Series contains the few clippings that are not housed in the Author Files Series. These clippings mostly consist of articles relating to literary figures.

Related collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library include the records of American Literature and the Modern Language Association's American Literature Section, as well as the papers of many of Gohdes's colleagues, such as Jay B. Hubbell and Arlin Turner.

Processing Note:

Roman numerals and transcribed titles taken from the original folders have been appended to certain folders, such as the Contemporary Poetry Selections.

Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.

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Claud Bethune Green papers, 1908-1979 5.5 Linear Feet — 1329 Items

Professor of English, Clemson University (So. Carolina). Lecture notes, correspondence, reading lists, bibliographies, syllabi, addresses, unpublished articles and other material.

Correspondence, lecture notes, reading lists, syllabi for theme writing and American literature courses, bibliographies of Christopher John Brennan, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and John Bannister Tabb, addresses and unpublished articles, and printed material, relating to Fulbright lectureships, including Green's own to the Universities of Adelaide and Sydney, Australia, 1956, Clemson University, and James Dickey. Includes correspondence with the family of John Trotwood Moore concerning Green's dissertation and book about Moore, and writings comparing education in Australia to that in the U.S.

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Frederic B.M. Hollyday papers, 1818-1982, bulk 1860s-1946 2 Linear Feet — Approx. 298 Items

Frederic Hollyday was a professor of German history in the Department of History at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Collection consists chiefly of letters of the Kennedy, Mumford, Hewlett, and Mann families, mainly from Michigan, containing some references to state political matters and the Civil War; letters and papers of Willoughby O'Donoughue, surgeon of the 1st Michigan Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, with enlistment and discharge papers, mustering-out lists, and papers concerning the Grand Army of the Republic; and papers of Frederick Blackmar Mumford, dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, including family letters, clippings, pictures, legal papers, diplomas and special awards, a diary, 1945, and a scrapbook tracing Mumford's career, 1917-1938. In addition, the collection includes correspondence pertaining to the controversy over the negotiations about establishing the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library at Duke; genealogy and family history of the Hollyday and Kennedy families; photographs; a scrapbook of correspondence, genealogical information, a diary in typescript, and legal papers, of the Mumford, Kennedy, Camburn, Strong and Hoskins families; Frederick Blackmar Mumford's (Hollyday's grandfather) travel diary describing Europe in 1900; and Prussian legal documents of the Dallmar family, 1850-1885.

Collection consists chiefly of three main groups of papers. The first comprises letters of the Kennedy, Mumford, Hewlett, and Mann families, mainly from Michigan, containing some references to state political matters and the Civil War. The second contains correspondence and papers of Willoughby O'Donoughue, surgeon of the 1st Michigan Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, contain enlistment and discharge papers, mustering-out lists, and papers concerning the Grand Army of the Republic. The third group comprises the papers of Frederick Blackmar Mumford, dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, and includes family letters, clippings, pictures, legal papers, diplomas and special awards, a diary, 1945, and a scrapbook tracing Mumford's career, 1917-1938.

In addition, the collection includes correspondence pertaining to the controversy over the negotiations about establishing the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library at Duke as well as an agenda for the meetings of the Academic Council on the same issue. Correspondents include: Edwin H. Cady; Jay Luvaas, Professor of History at Allegheny College and Ph.D. graduate at Duke; Roger Marshall, Special Assistant to President Sanford; Terry Sanford, President of Duke University; and Richard L. Watson, Jr., Acting Chairman of the History Department.

Other papers in the collection include genealogy and family history of the Hollyday and Kennedy families; photographs; a scrapbook of correspondence, genealogy, diary in typescript, legal papers and other documents of the Mumford, Kennedy, Camburn, Strong and Hoskins families; Frederick Blackmar Mumford's (Hollyday's grandfather) travel diary describing Europe in 1900; and Prussian legal documents of the Dallmar family, 1850-1885.

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Frederick Herzog papers, 1947-2011 (bulk 1947-1995) 32.4 Linear Feet — 24,300 Items

Frederick Herzog (1925-1995), former faculty member at the Duke Divinity School, was well known for his work on civil rights and liberation theology. The collection provides rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. Material includes audio cassettes of lectures, minutes from Herzog's lectures and classes, several English and German manuscripts of Herzog's publications, research files, photographs, significant correspondence, and speeches and lectures. Several materials dated after 1995 were contributed by Kristin Herzog, Frederick Herzog's wife.

The Frederick Herzog Papers span the years 1947-2011 with the bulk of the material spanning the years 1947-1995, the year of Herzog's death. These papers provide rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. The material covers specific areas in which Herzog was involved such as the Civil Rights Movement in Durham and other parts of North Carolina, Durham and Duke University history, student unrest in the 1960s, and human rights issues in Peru in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The collection includes video and audiocassettes regarding Herzog's involvement in Peru and various lectures and classes on theology. His work as a professor at the Duke Divinity School and with various other theological and civil rights organizations is documented in the correspondence he sent to and received from various individuals and groups, as well as in the various committee documents and minutes that record his professional activity in the university. The bulk of material on courses taught and lectures given by Herzog, as well as his participation in both the student exchange program with the University of Bonn and in the Peru and Bolivia student exchange program, can be found in his notebooks and course materials. A large part of this collection is comprised of Herzog's research files on religion, civil rights, labor organizing, racial issues, and protest in North Carolina and nationally, including Herzog's own participation in civil disobedience. Noteable research projects include his work in Peru, his work with the United Church of Christ (UCC) and the Evangelical Church of the Union (EKU), and his work with black churches and theology. This collection also contains original annotated drafts of a variety of Herzog's publications, sermons, speeches and lectures.

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Hans Baron papers, 1867-2018 and undated 41.3 Linear Feet — 88 boxes — approximately 49,000 items — 49,800 Items

Hans Baron was a reknowned German-born historian and scholar of Italian Renaissance history and literature who emigrated from Germany in 1933. Collection includes research notes, writings, and drafts, primarily concerning the Italian Renaissance, humanism, medieval and renaissance politics, Petrarch, Machiavelli, and related topics. There are also materials regarding his most significant monographs, especially for In Search of Florentine Civic Humanism: Essays on the Transition from Medieval to Modern Thought. Papers include writings and correspondence to and from other scholars, including Ron Witt, William Bouwsma, Gene Brucker, and Paul Oskar Kristeller. The main collection has received basic processing. There are also later additions that have not been arranged: these include unsorted research and travel notes, writings, clippings, memorabilia, and correspondence. Some of these materials are related to his emigration from Germany to the United States as a Jewish refugee, and his subsequent teaching and research appointments.

Hans Baron was a reknowned German-born historian and scholar of Italian Renaissance history and literature who emigrated from Germany in 1933. Collection includes research notes, writings, and drafts, primarily concerning the Italian Renaissance, humanism, medieval and renaissance politics, Petrarch, Machiavelli, and related topics. There are also materials regarding his most significant monographs, especially for In Search of Florentine Civic Humanism: Essays on the Transition from Medieval to Modern Thought. Papers include writings and correspondence to and from other scholars, including Ron Witt, William Bouwsma, Gene Brucker, and Paul Oskar Kristeller. The main collection has received basic processing. There are also later additions that have not been arranged: these include unsorted research and travel notes, writings, clippings, memorabilia, and correspondence. Some of these materials are related to his emigration from Germany to the United States as a Jewish refugee, and his subsequent teaching and research appointments.

Addition (02-265)(200 items, 0.4 lin. ft.; dated 1928-1971 and undated) contains research notes and materials relating to Francesco da Fiano, a 15th century Italian humanist. Also includes a packet of correspondence between Gene Brucker and Baron (1961-1971).

Addition (08-144)(45 items, .1 lin. ft.; dated 1971-1988) primarily contains correspondence between Baron and Ronald Witt (Duke University) regarding their publications and research, including grants for release time and negotiations with publishers; their agreements and disagreements regarding their area of specialization; and the problems associated with teaching at the college level in their specialty. Includes a few addendums to letters written by Baron's wife, Edith, as well as two letters to Witt from other sources. A few of the letters are missing pages.

Addition (2012-112) (0.8 lin. ft., 600 items) includes notes and edited drafts related to Hans Baron's work on Leonardo Bruni.

Addition (2015-0108) (2.0 lin. ft.) includes academic and personal correspondence, as well as other research and teaching materials, offficial emigration documents, travel notes, with a few memorabilia, and clippings, largely dating from the mid-1920s-1960s.

Addition (2017-0111) (1.0 lin. ft.) includes manuscript drafts, correspondence, and reproductions regarding Poggio Florentini.

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Harriet R. Holman papers, 1869-1986 16.5 Linear Feet — About 7899 Items

Author and professor of English from Anderson, S.C. Collection is chiefly significant for Holman's correspondence with writers, publishers and colleagues concerning the teaching and writing of American literature. Significant correspondents include Jay B. Hubbell, Rayburn Moore, Henry Field, Ann Page Johns, Armistead C. Gordon, Jr., Dr. Jeremiah N. Fusco, Corydon Bell, Guy Davenport, Edith Buchanan, Margaret Meaders, David Stocking, Marion Kingston Stocking, Newman I. White, E. M. Lander, Jr., Mattie U. Russell, and members of the Thomas Nelson Page and John Fox families. There are also letters from South Carolina authors, including Rosa Pendleton Chiles, Sidelle Ellis, Patricia Kneas Hill, Katharine M. Jones, Mary Boone Robertson Longley, and Alice L. O'Connell. Also includes works written or edited by Holman and others, a typed transcription of Cherokee stories as told by Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey, clippings, notecard files, printed material, and photographs of Thomas Nelson and Florence Lathrop Page, and Nannie Mae Tilley.

The papers of Harriet Rebecca Holman span the years 1869-1986, and are chiefly significant for Holman's correspondence with writers, publishers and colleagues concerning the teaching and writing of American literature. Significant correspondents include Jay B. Hubbell, Rayburn Moore, Henry Field, Ann Page Johns, Armistead C. Gordon, Jr., Dr. Jeremiah N. Fusco, Corydon Bell, Guy Davenport, Edith Buchanan, Margaret Meaders, David Stocking, Marion Kingston Stocking, Newman I. White, E. M. Lander, Jr., Mattie U. Russell and members of the Thomas Nelson Page and John Fox families. The Page family materials constitute a large portion of the materials in this collection and are represented by their own series. There are also letters from South Carolina authors, including Rosa Pendleton Chiles, Sidelle Ellis, Patricia Kneas Hill, Katharine M. Jones, Mary Boone Robertson Longley, and Alice L. O'Connell. Also includes works written or edited by Holman and others, a typed transcription of Cherokee stories as told by Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey, clippings, notecard files, printed material, and photographs of Thomas Nelson and Florence Lathrop Page, and Nannie Mae Tilley. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.