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Allan Gurganus (1947- ), a gay, white, Southern writer, was born in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. Gurganus trained as a painter, served in the United States Navy during the Vietnam War, then studied at Sarah Lawrence College and the Iowa Writers' Workshop. He later taught writing at Sarah Lawrence College; the Iowa Writers' Workshop; Stanford University; and Duke University. The collection includes the following series: (1) Writings; (2) Correspondence; (3) Personal Papers; (4) Artwork; and (5) Others' Works.

The (1) Writings Series is divided into the Books, Novellas and Articles subseries, Uncollected Works subseries, and Addresses and Speeches subseries. Gurganus's writings, collected here as manuscripts, typescripts, and proofs with notes, documenting his development of well-known and critically-acclaimed works. His collected works include White People; The Practical Heart; Plays Well with Others; and, Local Souls. Gurganus's other books and individual stories, essays, and drawings or illustrations related to the titles are included in this Series.

The (2) Correspondence Series is divided into the Chronological Correspondence subseries which consists of letters to and from Gurganus, publishers, and friends, and the Correspondence, Alphabetical by Name subseries is comprised of correspondence between Gurganus and other writers, artists, literary figures, and close friends.

The (3) Personal Papers Series contains Gurganus's family correspondence, documents, many of the books, letters, art and photographs kept in his home. Financial and legal records as well as documentation of his writing career through contracts and royalty statements are also included in this series. The (4) Artwork Series is comprised of doodles, drawings, paintings, and sketches. Series (5) Others' Works, includes books, articles, and typescripts written by friends, students, and others.

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The purpose of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is to advance academic freedom and shared governance, to define fundamental professional values and standards for higher education, and to ensure higher education's contribution to the common good. The collection includes correspondence, reports, proceedings, memoranda, and other materials of the American Association of University Professors from the period when Duke University faculty member William T. Laprade was chairman of its Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure (1937-1942, 1948-1953), and president (1942-1943). A sample of the folders shows material concerning academic freedom cases, dismissals, quality of educational support and other matters of concern to the organization's membership. English.

Correspondence, reports, proceedings, memoranda, and other materials of the AAUP from the period when Duke University faculty member William T. Laprade was chairman of its Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure (1937-1942, 1948-1953), and president (1942-1943). A sample of the folders shows material concerning academic freedom cases, dismissals, quality of educational support and other matters of concern to the organization's membership. Series 1 consists of correspondence relating to concerns expressed to the Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure (Committee A), along with a few reports. Series 2 is made up of the Proceedings noted below. Series 3 appears to be the correspondence files from the office of the Association's President, but there are no folder titles and no apparent order.

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"Bill" Burk, retired, botany librarian at the John N. Couch Biology Library, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Collection comprises three folders of letters written to Burk by botanist Sherwin Carlquist. The majority of the letters are accompanied by examples of Carlquist's black-and-white 8"x10" landscape photographs, including seven photographic prints on enlarging paper, as well as scanned copies printed on a laser printer. There are also advertisements for Carlquist's books of landscape photographs featuring male nudes. The letters are most often general holiday greetings Carlquist mailed to all his friends, usually annotated with specific notes to Burk; others are personal letters to Burk. Carlquist's letters mainly provide information regarding the accompanying photographs and his artistic approach to photography, especially the male nudes; there is additional commentary on the history of botany; his writing, publication, and research projects; the work of other scientists; and his personal life. Other topics include gay fiction and culture, the challenges of being gay in academe, and circumcision. Books mentioned include: HAWAII, OUTSIDERS, COMPARATIVE WOOD ANATOMY, TARWEEDS AND SILVERSWORDS, THE NATURAL MALE, MAN/NATURE, NATURAL MANSCAPES, MEN IN NATURE, UNCUT, and NATURAL OBJECTS.

Collection comprises three folders of letters written to Burk by botanist Sherwin Carlquist. The majority of the letters are accompanied by examples of Carlquist's black-and-white 8"x10" landscape photographs, including seven photographic prints on enlarging paper, as well as scanned copies printed on a laser printer. There are also advertisements for Carlquist's books of landscape photographs featuring male nudes. The letters are most often general holiday greetings Carlquist mailed to all his friends, usually annotated with specific notes to Burk; others are personal letters to Burk. Carlquist's letters mainly provide information regarding the accompanying photographs and his artistic approach to photography, especially the male nudes; there is additional commentary on the history of botany; his writing, publication, and research projects; the work of other scientists; and his personal life. Other topics include gay fiction and culture, the challenges of being gay in academe, and circumcision. Books mentioned include: HAWAII, OUTSIDERS, COMPARATIVE WOOD ANATOMY, TARWEEDS AND SILVERSWORDS, THE NATURAL MALE, MAN/NATURE, NATURAL MANSCAPES, MEN IN NATURE, UNCUT, and NATURAL OBJECTS.

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Charles Howell Foster papers, 1920-1979 0.5 Linear Feet — 134 Items

Professor of American Literature, University of Minnesota. The collection is largely correspondence but also includes clippings.

Correspondence (1936-1979) chiefly from or pertaining to Norman Foerster, professor of English and pioneer in the teaching of American literature, discussing Foster's career and Foerster's activities following his resignation from the University of Iowa, 1944. Also, clippings about or references to Robert Frost and Harriet Beecher Stowe; and printed material.

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Frederick Herzog papers, 1947-2011 (bulk 1947-1995) 32.4 Linear Feet — 24,300 Items

Frederick Herzog (1925-1995), former faculty member at the Duke Divinity School, was well known for his work on civil rights and liberation theology. The collection provides rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. Material includes audio cassettes of lectures, minutes from Herzog's lectures and classes, several English and German manuscripts of Herzog's publications, research files, photographs, significant correspondence, and speeches and lectures. Several materials dated after 1995 were contributed by Kristin Herzog, Frederick Herzog's wife.

The Frederick Herzog Papers span the years 1947-2011 with the bulk of the material spanning the years 1947-1995, the year of Herzog's death. These papers provide rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. The material covers specific areas in which Herzog was involved such as the Civil Rights Movement in Durham and other parts of North Carolina, Durham and Duke University history, student unrest in the 1960s, and human rights issues in Peru in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The collection includes video and audiocassettes regarding Herzog's involvement in Peru and various lectures and classes on theology. His work as a professor at the Duke Divinity School and with various other theological and civil rights organizations is documented in the correspondence he sent to and received from various individuals and groups, as well as in the various committee documents and minutes that record his professional activity in the university. The bulk of material on courses taught and lectures given by Herzog, as well as his participation in both the student exchange program with the University of Bonn and in the Peru and Bolivia student exchange program, can be found in his notebooks and course materials. A large part of this collection is comprised of Herzog's research files on religion, civil rights, labor organizing, racial issues, and protest in North Carolina and nationally, including Herzog's own participation in civil disobedience. Noteable research projects include his work in Peru, his work with the United Church of Christ (UCC) and the Evangelical Church of the Union (EKU), and his work with black churches and theology. This collection also contains original annotated drafts of a variety of Herzog's publications, sermons, speeches and lectures.

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Purviance family papers, 1757-1932 3 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 2,363 items (includes 16 vols.)

This collection contains professional, business, personal and family correspondence and other papers of the related Purviance and Courtenay families of Baltimore, Md., and elsewhere. The collection pertains to Revolutionary War activities in Maryland, shipping and trade, Western lands, settlement of estates, Civil War veterans' activities, the Cuban independence movement, and other matters. Includes papers of John Henry Purviance, U.S. diplomat in Paris, concerning the Monroe Mission (1794), U.S. relations with Napoleon and the Revolutionary French Government; papers relating to the financial affairs of Elizabeth Isabella Purviance Courtenay; papers of Edward H. Courtenay, Sr., relating to his career at West Point, his later teaching duties there and at other colleges, and his investment activities; and letters of Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., written in Washington, D.C., during the Civil War, describing the city and political opinion there. Correspondents include Alexander Dallas Bache, George William Erving, John Graham, Gessner Harrison, Anthony Hart, William Homes McGuffey, William Maclay, George Mason, James Monroe, Abner Nash, Fulwar Skipwith, George Muirson Totten, Thomas Tudor Tucker, and John Vanderlyn.

The Purviance family papers contain professional and family correspondence and papers of two generations of the Purviance family and several generations of the Courtenay family, related through the marriage of Henry Courtenay and Elizabeth Isabella Purviance in 1811.

The early papers relate chiefly to Samuel Purviance (d. 1787), Baltimore merchant, and chairman of the Committee of Observation for Baltimore County, and consist of records that include the interrogation of Purviance by the Council of Safety for the failure of a plan by the Committee of Observation to capture Maryland governor Robert Eden; correspondence discussing British depredations on American shipping, the extension of the Mason-Dixon line, cession of western lands, complaints against the Vandalia and Indiana Land companies, sale of lands owned by Purviance on the Chillisquaque River near Sunbury (Pennsylvania), lands owned by George Washington on the Kanawha River, and proposed development of the James River Canal; scattered letters from his wife concerning family matters; and letters from his son, John Henry Purviance, regarding his supervision of his father's western lands.

The professional papers of John Henry Purviance, secretary and interpreter to the James Monroe mission, 1794-1796, and secretary of the legation in London, 1804-1810, include memoranda regarding official diplomatic transactions; accounts, 1795, of interviews between Monroe and Jean Debrie, member of the Committee of Public Safety concerning arbitration of the war between France and Great Britain, French suspicion of the Jay Treaty, and the offices of the French in negotiations pending between the United States and Algiers; an account of a conversation between Monroe and one Fulton discussing the efforts of one La Chaise to persuade France to take possession of Louisiana and Florida as a check on American expansion and as a means of luring Kentucky away from the confederation, and Monroe's attempts to strengthen the ties of western territories to the union by asking France to influence Spain to keep the Mississippi River open to American trade; memoranda, 1796, concerning the difficulties of obtaining cash for a draft sent Monroe by the U.S. Treasury; Monroe's outline of a speech to the French National Convention; rough draft of a note from Monroe to the French minister of foreign affairs, Charles Delacroix, pertaining to the Fauchet letter; from Fulwar Skipwith, American consul-general at Paris, regarding Pierre Louis Roederer and the ratification of the treaty of 1800 which concluded the XYZ affair; rough drafts, 1806, of articles by Monroe describing the relations between the United States, Great Britain, and France; copy of a letter from Joseph Lakanal to an unnamed royal personage urging him to assert himself as ruler of Spain; rumors among the French peasantry of the impending return of Napoleon and gossip current in diplomatic circles; document, 1815, of Bon Adrien Jeannot de Moncey, Duc de Conegliano, making recommendations concerning France's foreign policy; letter, 1817, from the minister of Brazil to the U.S. minister containing copies of the correspondence between himself and the Russian minister dealing with a question of diplomatic protocol; and correspondence concerning Purviance's administrative duties.

Items of a more personal nature include papers relating to the financial affairs of his sister, Elizabeth Isabella Purviance, and the claims of her guardian, David Stewart, against the British government for capture of his vessels; commonplace book, 1781, containing extracts from a tour through Great Britain, excerpts from poems, and a few accounts; account book, 1801-1809, of travel expenses in the United States and Europe; commonplace book of excerpts from poems; commonplace book, 1811-1834, containing a travel diary of England and France, expenses, and a discussion of French government; a diary, 1819, of his travels including his impressions of the BayonneBiarritz area noted in the course of a diplomatic mission to Spain; and a memorandum book, 1818, with daily entries regarding weather, correspondence with President Monroe, and personal and financial matters.

Papers of Edward H. Courtenay (d. 1853) include correspondence with his uncle, John Henry Purviance, discussing the former's work and activities at West Point; papers dealing with the settlement of the estate of his grandfather, Hercules Courtenay (d. 1816); correspondence of Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., while attending school in Geneva, New York; personal correspondence concerning family and financial affairs; and personal correspondence with his brother, David Courtenay, regarding dealings in stocks, especially those of the Erie Railroad Company and the Aetna Life Insurance Company.

Other papers of the Courtenay family include occasional records of the 1st Maryland Volunteers under Lieutenant Colonel N. T. Dushane; letters from Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., describing his work with the U.S. Coastal Survey, divided sentiment in Maryland during the Civil War, and Washington, D.C.; commissions, appointment and other military papers of Chauncey B. Reese and Henry Brewerton, husbands of Mary I. Courtenay and Sarah Courtenay, respectively, daughters of Edward H. Courtenay, Sr.; correspondence between David Courtenay and his son, William, regarding West Virginia lands which were a part of the Purviance estate, and the discovery of oil on those lands; papers relating to the administration of the estates of various members of the Courtenay family; business papers of William C. Courtenay; financial papers, principally in stock speculation, of several members of the family; financial records of the Maryland Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and of the 5th Maryland Regiment Veteran Corps; letter, 1869, from Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., discussing efforts of Cuba to free herself from Spain and the attitude of the United States towards such efforts, and commenting upon the treatment of Chinese immigrants in the United States; and papers concerning the disappearance and probable death of David S. Courtenay, son of Edward H. Courtenay, Sr., and Virginia (Howard) Courtenay.

Separated volumes include a mercantile ledger, 1781-1816, of Hercules Courtenay containing accounts of food products, tar, rum, ginseng, ships and shipping ventures, and insurance; ledgers, 1764-1779, and account book for debts receivable, 1764-1776, of Dr. John Boyd, Baltimore physician, containing records of an apothecary; books of recipes and remedies. list of American vessels destroyed by the British; daybook, 1801-1804, of merchant Henry William Courtenay with accounts for flour, food, and other commodities; account books, 1824-1826 and 1835-1842, of David S. Courtenay recording money spent for postage, cash received for legal services, expenditures in lotteries, and personal expenses; address book, possibly of David S. Courtenay; anonymous account book, 1815; scrapbook, 1836, of H. W. Courtenay; diary, 1861, of a soldier including a description of his stay in a Confederate prison; and a scrapbook, 1892-1909, of clippings relating to Baltimore and to the Purviance and Courtenay families.

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Robert W. Clower papers, 1920s-2000 and undated 20 Linear Feet — 11,250 items

The papers of economist Robert Clower consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999.

The Robert Clower Papers consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999. Clower's correspondence includes many prominent names of 20th century economics: Milton Friedman, John R. Hicks, Peter Howitt, Arjo Klamer, David Laidler, Axel Leijonhufvud, Don Patinkin, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, and others. Duke University faculty are represented in the Clower papers by Craufurd Goodwin, Neil DeMarchi, and Roy Weintraub. Also included are: Moses Abramowitz, Jess Benhabib, Clive Bull, David Colander, Paul Davidson, Frank Hahn, John Haltiwanger, Tom Hazlett, Roger Kormendi, Larry Kotlikoff, Robert Solow, and Sir Alan Walters. The Correspondence Series also includes a subseries of recommendation files. The collection also includes files of Clower's writings, ranging from notes and fragments to drafts and copies of published articles. Writings date from the 1950s through the 1990s. Topics covered in the collection include monetary theory, price theory, price determination, employment, banking, disequilibrium, stock-flow analysis, Keynesian economics/macroeconomics, Say's Law, and mathematical economics. The collection does not contain a complete set of drafts of Clower's writings. Many of the writings are untitled typescripts and fragments of notes.

The collection includes writings from Clower's father, F.W. (Fay Walter) Clower, also an economist; two copies of John Maynard Keynes's The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money, annotated by Clower; 5 cassette tapes with dictated letters; teaching materials from several economics classes taught by Clower throughout his career; and legal transcripts of 1979 court cases and hearings in which Clower testified.

The Robert Clower Papers consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999. Clower's correspondence includes many prominent names of 20th century economics: Milton Friedman, John R. Hicks, Peter Howitt, Arjo Klamer, David Laidler, Axel Leijonhufvud, Don Patinkin, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, and others. Duke University faculty are represented in the Clower papers by Craufurd Goodwin, Neil DeMarchi, and Roy Weintraub. Also included are: Moses Abramowitz, Jess Benhabib, Clive Bull, David Colander, Paul Davidson, Frank Hahn, John Haltiwanger, Tom Hazlett, Roger Kormendi, Larry Kotlikoff, Robert Solow, and Sir Alan Walters. The Correspondence Series also includes a subseries of recommendation files. The collection also includes files of Clower's writings, ranging from notes and fragments to drafts and copies of published articles. Writings date from the 1950s through the 1990s. Topics covered in the collection include monetary theory, price theory, price determination, employment, banking, disequilibrium, stock-flow analysis, Keynesian economics/macroeconomics, Say's Law, and mathematical economics. The collection does not contain a complete set of drafts of Clower's writings. Many of the writings are untitled typescripts and fragments of notes.

The collection includes writings from Clower's father, F.W. (Fay Walter) Clower, also an economist; two copies of John Maynard Keynes's The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money, annotated by Clower; 5 cassette tapes with dictated letters; teaching materials from several economics classes taught by Clower throughout his career; and legal transcripts of 1979 court cases and hearings in which Clower testified.

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Wallace Fowlie papers, 1911-1998 and undated 5 Linear Feet — 516 Items

Writer, critic, translator, and faculty member at Duke University specializing in modern French literature. The Wallace Fowlie Papers span the years 1911 to 1998 and consist mainly of correspondence sent to Fowlie, but also texts from Fowlie's personal library, publications on French literature authored by Fowlie, typescript and handwritten drafts by Fowlie, amd clippings pertaining to Fowlie's career. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises exchanges between Fowlie and Thomas and Kit Foster. These letters mainly address personal and family matters (health issues, vacations and meeting with mutual friends), but also cover projects Fowlie was working on, teaching positions accepted and rejected and class progress, and other matters of professional relevance. There is also a folder of correspondence with Fowlie, almost entirely in French, that was maintained by John M. Dunaway, a Romance Languages professor at Mercer College in Georgia. It includes a few color photographs. Other smaller amounts of correspondence come from Robert Heslen, a former student of Fowlie, and well-known writers/artists including René Char, Jean Cocteau, André Gide, Alexis Léger (Saint-Jean Perse), Marianne Moore, Anaïs Nin, and others, discussing literary matters and their writings and careers. There are letters from Fowlie to Walter Muther. A folder of general correspondence contains single letters from a variety of colleagues and friends. Selections from Fowlie's library are sorted into works and translations by Fowlie, and works he used privately or for his own research.

The Wallace Fowlie Papers span the years 1911 to 1998 and consist mainly of correspondence sent to Fowlie, but also texts from Fowlie's personal library, publications on French literature authored by Fowlie, typescript and handwritten drafts by Fowlie, amd clippings pertaining to Fowlie's career. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises exchanges between Fowlie and Thomas and Kit Foster. These letters mainly address personal and family matters (health issues, vacations and meeting with mutual friends), but also cover projects Fowlie was working on, teaching positions accepted and rejected and class progress, and other matters of professional relevance. There is also a folder of correspondence with Fowlie, almost entirely in French, that was maintained by John M. Dunaway, a Romance Languages professor at Mercer College in Georgia. It includes a few color photographs. Other smaller amounts of correspondence come from Robert Heslen, a former student of Fowlie, and well-known writers/artists including René Char, Jean Cocteau, André Gide, Alexis Léger (Saint-Jean Perse), Marianne Moore, Anaïs Nin, and others, discussing literary matters and their writings and careers. There are letters from Fowlie to Walter Muther. A folder of general correspondence contains single letters from a variety of colleagues and friends. Selections from Fowlie's library are sorted into works and translations by Fowlie, and works he used privately or for his own research.

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Walter Weir papers, 1909-1996 and undated, bulk 1950-1990 14 Linear Feet — Approximately 7,700 Items

Walter Weir was an advertising executive, marketing and communications consultant, and professor of advertising. He worked for a number of agencies, including N.W. Ayer & Sons, J. M. Mathes, Lord & Thomas, and Kenyon & Eckhardt. He founded Walter Weir, Inc., which merged into larger firms over the years, was co-owner of Switzerland-based La Borie/Weir S.A., and headed Walter Weir Communications, Inc. Weir also taught advertising at the University of Tennessee and Temple University, wrote three books on advertising, annonymously authored the Creative Man's Corner column in Advertising Age magazine for 25 years, and composed numerous speeches, articles, short stories, poems, songs, and musicals. The Walter Weir Papers span the years 1909 through 1996, the bulk of which cover the 1950s through the early 1990s. The collection consists of audiocassettes, audiotapes, correspondence, course materials, clippings, musical scores, photographs, presentations, proofs, print advertising copy, radio advertisement scripts, songs, speeches, writings, and voiceovers documenting Weir's career in advertising, marketing, consulting, and teaching. The collection also documents Weir's prose, poems, and musicals, as well as his relationship with son Anthony Weir. Agencies and clients represented include the Alexander Proudfoot Company, Green Thumb Corporation, Interhydro AG, Jackson & Perkins Co., La Borie/Weir SA, Ralston Purina, Stratford of Texas, Inc., Walter Weir, Inc., and Walter Weir Communications, Inc. The collection also includes materials relating to Crain Communications Inc., which published Advertising Age, as well as the University of Tennessee and Temple University, and Weir's correspondence with Oscar Hammerstein II.

The Walter Weir Papers span the years 1909 through 1996, the bulk of which cover the 1950s through the early 1990s. The collection consists of audiocassettes, audiotapes, correspondence, course materials, clippings, musical scores, photographs, presentations, proofs, print advertising copy, radio advertisement scripts, songs, speeches, writings, and voiceovers documenting Weir's career in advertising, marketing, consulting, and teaching. The collection also documents Weir's prose, poems, and musicals, as well as his relationship with son Anthony Weir. Agencies and clients represented include the Alexander Proudfoot Company, Green Thumb Corporation, Interhydro AG, Jackson & Perkins Co., La Borie/Weir SA, Ralston Purina, Stratford of Texas, Inc., Walter Weir, Inc., and Walter Weir Communications, Inc. The collection also includes materials relating to Crain Communications Inc., which published Advertising Age, as well as the University of Tennessee and Temple University, and Weir's correspondence with Oscar Hammerstein II.

This collection is organized into six series: Musical, Personal, Professional, Teaching, Writings and Speeches, and Audiovisual Materials.

The Musical Series documents Weir's work on scores and scripts for musical theatre. Much of the correspondence in this series narrates Weir's efforts to produce a musical based on the Frederic Wakeman novel The Hucksters. Includes correspondence with Oscar Hammerstein II.

The Personal Series contains biographical data about Weir and his involvement with family and friends through correspondence, clippings, greeting cards, photographs, and handwritten notes. The bulk of the correspondence documents Weir's personal and professional relationship with his son, Anthony.

The Professional Series documents Weir's career in advertising, marketing, and communications. Advertising copy, clippings, correspondence, proposals, presentations, and legal and financial papers represent Weir's work from the beginning of his career at N.W. Ayer through the evolution of his company, Walter Weir, Inc., as well as through subsequent business ventures, including La Borie/Weir SA, Walter Weir Communications, Inc., and freelance consulting work.

The Teaching Series represents Weir's work, following his official retirement from the advertising industry, as a professor of advertising, marketing and communications at the University of Tennessee and Temple University. Correspondence, course materials, and clippings document this extension of Weir's career from his introduction to and retirement from the academy.

The Writings and Speeches Series includes fiction, poetry, and non-fiction written by Weir on subjects both related and unrelated to advertising. Among these are articles published in Printer's Ink and Advertising Age; unpublished manuscripts of autobiographies, bound copies of Weir's book How to Create Interest-Evoking, Sales-Inducing, Non-Irritating Advertising; transcripts of talks and addresses Weir gave about advertising throught his career, including an address for the James Webb Young Foundation; and correspondence with Rance Crain of Crain Communications, Inc., publisher of Advertising Age.

The Audiovisual Series includes auiotapes and audiocassettes of advertising-related talks and addresses, notably for the Million Dollar Round Table Tape Cassette Program. In addition, there are radio spots for clients including Mountain Dew, E.F. Hutton, and Merril, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane, as well as samples of voiceovers and radio commercial productions.

Large-format print materials have been removed from their original series locations and relocated to Oversize Materials. Relocated items have been indicated in the Detailed Description of the Collection by notes enclosed in brackets.