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The Edgar Marquess Branch Papers span the years from 1939 to 2003, with the majority of the materials dating from 1960 to 1990. Through correspondence and writings, they document Branch's lifelong research on nineteenth-century American author Mark Twain. Important correspondents include such Twain scholars as Fred Anderson, Louis Budd, Cyril Clemens, Robert Hirst, and Henry Nash Smith. Topics chiefly focus on issues concerning academic writers, and Twain's life and literary output. Although the bulk of this collection concerns Branch's work on Twain, it should be noted that Professor Branch was also an eminent scholar of James T. Farrell, a twentieth-century American novelist best known for his "Studs Lonigan" series (1932-1935). Branch's papers are organized into three series: Correspondence, Special Projects Files, and Writings. Although Branch taught for many years as a Professor of English, there are no teaching materials in the collection. However, the correspondence may contain some references to teaching American literature and to activities as a faculty member at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

The Correspondence Series, the largest series in the collection, is organized into two subseries. The Individuals Subseries documents Branch's contacts over many decades with numerous Twain scholars, literary critics, and former students. There are also letters concerning his contacts with institutions such as the Mark Twain Boyhood Home Association. The Journals and Publishers Subseries contains Branch's correspondence with many well-known publishing firms and academic presses. Most of the correspondence is routine in nature but attests to Branch's lengthy and prolific writing career. In a few cases, drafts of writings are attached to his correspondence.

The bulk of the Mark Twain Special Projects Files Series consists of documents that pertain to Branch's service on the Board of Directors for the Mark Twain Project, based at the University of California at Berkeley, from 1980 to 1990. Administrative files and grant application files make up the majority of the materials.

The Writings Series consists of manuscripts and galley proofs of the Early Tales and Sketches of Mark Twain, Volume 1, and the page proofs for Early Tales and Sketches, Volume 2. Branch co-edited both of these volumes, which were published in 1979 and 1981, respectively.

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The papers consist of correspondence from Jay B. Hubbell and John Olin Eidson. The Eidson letters (5 items) discuss the upcoming program of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association of America and suggest Richard Armour as the featured speaker. The letters are arranged chronologically.

Accession (1992-0127) (20,000 items, 30.0 lin. ft.) includes correspondence, research and teaching notes, writings, student offprints, card files, photostats, materials relating to the Center for Editions of American Authors, files relating to American Literature, printed matter, clippings, and other miscellaneous items. Correspondence includes letters from Jay B. Hubbell and John O. Eidson; the latter concern the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association.

Accession (2002-0104), dated 1858-2000 (1251 items; 6.8 linear feet) primarily comprises materials related to writings by Cady and his former student Thomas F. O'Donnell regarding author, editor, and critic William Dean (W.D.) Howells. In 2000, Cady edited and wrote an introduction to a volume of Howells' poetry entitled Pebbles, Monochromes, and Other Modern Poems, 1891-1916, and his collection holds various drafts of this work as well as correspondence between Cady and his publishers concerning the book's publication. Also included is material written by or collected by Cady or O'Donnell while editing or writing other books and articles regarding Howells' poetry; and original correspondence from Howells to his publishers.

Accession (2010-0083) (300 items; 7.5 lin. ft.) includes books by and about William Dean Howells, most with annotations by Edwin Cady and Harry H. Clark, as well as materials (first proofs, drafts, and other Howells publications) that were used by Cady in the preparation of Howells' complete works. Books date from approximately 1881-1981; manuscript materials date from approximately 1879-1992.

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Fred Chappell papers, 1944-2019 and undated 158 Linear Feet — 5.9 Gigabytes

The fully processed portion of the Fred Chappell Papers spans the dates 1960-1997, with the bulk being dated after 1970. There are several additions covering the years 1998 through 2015. The collection consists of correspondence; writings by Chappell and other authors; printed material (primarily serials containing stories, poems, and articles by Chappell but also clippings); legal and financial papers; speeches and addresses; interviews; and other material. Documents relate to Chappell's personal life and career, both as a student and writer at Duke University, where he studied under well-known creative writing teacher William Blackburn, and as a writer and professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNC-G). The collection documents the entire length and breadth of Chappell's multifaceted career, beginning with the years just after he completed his undergraduate studies at Duke and started his first novel at the urging of Hiram Haydn, an editor to whom Blackburn had introduced him. Letters, manuscripts, and notebooks provide insight into Chappell's developing literary career, his academic activities at UNC-G, and his growing involvement with a large network of writers, including a number of his former students. Many prominent American authors, especially Southern ones, are represented in the collection. Among the most frequent correspondents are Kelly Cherry, Grace DiSanto, George Garrett, Marianne Gingher, Dana Gioia, Donald Hall, Heather Ross Miller, Robert Morgan, Eve Shelnutt, and Dabney Stuart. Notebooks, manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, and printed material document the development of Chappell's career across all the genres in which he writes. Supporting material in non-print media, including photographs and audio and video cassettes of readings, document public aspects of his career.

The Correspondence Series, arranged chronologically in Incoming and Outgoing subseries, discloses the range of Chappell's interests and activities in the literary community. The letters not only provide a portrait of his development as a poet and novelist but also demonstrate his active roles in supporting the careers of other writers and promoting the literary community. These latter activities are documented by his numerous affirmative responses to a broad range of requests to read drafts of works-in-progress, write recommendations for other writers for grants and awards, write reviews and provide blurbs for new publications, serve as the judge of contests, speak at conferences and workshops, and serve in various advisory and editorial capacities for literary journals. The correspondence also provides much information about his teaching career and his legacy of students who develop successful careers of their own, such as Cherry, Miller, Morgan, and Shelnutt. The bulk of the outgoing correspondence dates to 1990 or after, when, at the request of the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library, Chappell began retaining copies of all outgoing correspondence.

The Writings by Chappell Series is divided into subseries by genres with the exception of one subseries based on format, the Notebooks Subseries. Since Chappell writes with relatively few hand corrections on any particular stage of his work, the development of an individual work is often apparent only by comparing various complete drafts in manuscripts, typescripts, and proofs. The notebooks are particularly valuable in this regard, providing what often appear to be the earliest versions of works. The notebooks also indicate the facility with which Chappell moves from one genre to another, as most of them are not devoted to a single work or genre but rather include poems, stories, novel fragments, essays, reviews, translations, and drafts of correspondence following one after the other. This versatility is further reflected by the Printed Materials Series, which contains extensive serials with Chappell's publications in multiple genres, especially fiction, poetry, and reviews. At the end of this series, the Clippings Subseries documents his public and critical reception with copies of reviews and essays about his work and publicity about it.

The Miscellaneous Series contains a variety of flyers, leaflets, newsletters, and examples of fan mail that further demonstrate his literary career. Prominent here are such items as the proofs for a 1990 symposium about his poetry and newsletters of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. It also contains two small subseries of audio and video cassettes of readings, interviews, and work by other authors.

The Writings by Others Series contains manuscripts from well-known contemporary writers, ex-students, and aspiring writers seeking advice. Chappell's reactions to the manuscripts are written on many of them, often as the first draft of a letter or requested recommendation. Most writers are represented by only one or two items, but Cherry and Shelnutt are both represented by more than a dozen pieces that, together with their frequent correspondence, outline the development of their respective careers.

Later additions to the collection include incoming and outgoing correspondence, drafts and writings of Chappell's poetry, honors and awards, and printed materials and publications featuring Chappell or his work. Most accessions include bound volumes as well as writings and manuscripts by other authors or poets. There are also some oversize materials, audiovisual materials, clippings, and photographs. These additions have been loosely sorted but have not been incorporated physically or intellectually into the originally processed collection. Please consult Research Services with questions about using these materials.

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James Leslie Woodress papers, 1941-1976 2.4 Linear Feet — 1112 Items

Professor of American literature at the University of California, Davis. The James Leslie Woodress Papers span the years from 1941 to 1976. The collection (2.4 linear feet) consists mainly of professional papers including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, editors and publishers, copyright holders, libraries, and others regarding the production of a number of Woodress' published works on the history of American literature.

The James Leslie Woodress Papers span the years from 1941 to 1976. The collection consists mainly of professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, editors and publishers, copyright holders, libraries, and others regarding the production of a number of Woodress' published works, including Booth Tarkington: Gentleman from Indiana, Dissertations in American Literature, Eight American Authors, Essays Mostly on Periodical Publishing in America: A Collection in Honor of Clarence Gohdes, Howells and Italy, A Yankee's Odyssey: The Life of Joel Barlow, and "Voices from America's Past," a historical pamphlets series. Among the significant correspondents are Ashbel G. Brice and John Menapace of the Duke University Press, Elizabeth Blackert and Robert F. Wilson of McGraw-Hill, and scholars such as Walter Blair, Hugh Holman, Jay B. Hubbell, Lewis Leary, Floyd Stovall, and Willard Thorp. Background notes and drafts of publication materials are also contained in the collection. The collection is divided into seven series, corresponding to Woodress' published works and arranged in alphabetical order by title: Booth Tarkington, Dissertations in American Literature, Eight American Authors, Essays Mostly on Periodical Publishing in America, Howells and Italy, Voices from America's Past, and Yankee's Odyssey. These series are described fully below. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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Professor of American literature, Duke University, Durham, N.C. The Jay B. Hubbell Papers span the years from 1816 to 1998, with the bulk of the material documenting Hubbell's career from his early student years in the 1920s until his death in 1979. The collection consists mainly of his professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, articles written by others at his request for the Jay B. Hubbell Center, printed materials inscribed to him and written by him, and unpublished manuscripts. The material chronicles the four decades of Hubbell's career as professor and critic, which he dedicated to the growth and development of American literature as a field of critical inquiry. Among the many significant correspondents or subjects of others' writings are Conrad Aiken, Gay Wilson Allen, Robert Frost, Clarence Gohdes, members of the Hubbell family, Ralph Leslie Rusk, Carl Sandburg, Allen Tate, Arlin Turner, and John Hall Wheelock. Other significant topics covered by the material include the founding of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University, the study and teaching of literature from the American South, the activities of the faculty at Duke University, and the development of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association (MLA).

The Jay B. Hubbell Papers span the years from 1816 to 1998, with the bulk of the material documenting Hubbell's career from his early student years in the 1920s until his death in 1979. The collection consists mainly of his professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, articles written by others at his request for the Jay B. Hubbell Center, printed materials inscribed to him and written by him, and unpublished manuscripts. The material chronicles the four decades of Hubbell's career as professor and critic, which he dedicated to the growth and development of American literature as a field of critical inquiry. Among the many significant correspondents or subjects of others' writings are Conrad Aiken, Gay Wilson Allen, Robert Frost, Clarence Gohdes, members of the Hubbell family, Ralph Leslie Rusk, Carl Sandburg, Allen Tate, Arlin Turner, and John Hall Wheelock. Other significant topics covered by the material include the founding of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University, the study and teaching of literature from the American South, the activities of the faculty at Duke University, and the development of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association (MLA). The collection is divided into eight series: Biographical; Correspondence, Alphabetical; Correspondence by Date; Writings and Speeches; Subject Files; Teaching Abroad; Photographs; and Clippings.

The Biographical Data Series contains correspondence, manuscripts of his autobiographical writings, financial and legal documents, writings by his siblings, curriculum vitae, and obituaries, all of which chronicle Hubbell's life from his earliest years until his death.

The largest component of the collection contains correspondence from colleagues, former students, and literary figures. The Correspondence, Alphabetical Series consists of many letters from students and colleagues. The bulk of the correspondence gives shape to the nature and status of American literary studies in the early- to mid-twentieth century. In particular, the many letters exchanged among Hubbell, his colleagues, and his students provide insight into the routine professional life of this first pioneering generation of scholars. From job appointments to topics of scholarship, the letters uncover the kinds of professional interests and pressures that influenced the formation of American literary studies. Additional miscellaneous letters are arranged chronologically in the Correspondence by Date Series. These letters mainly represent single items from colleagues, publishers, and minor writers. The same topics are represented here as in the correspondence arranged alphabetically.

Jay B. Hubbell authored numerous articles and books throughout his career which contributed to the bibliography of American literary studies. Samples of such are located in the collection's Writings and Speeches Series. The series is divided into two subseries, the Writings by Hubbell Subseries and the Writings by Others Subseries. The Writings by Hubbell Subseries includes unpublished manuscripts, publication files consisting of correspondence with publishers and review clippings, and printed material consisting of article reprints and reviews. The Writings by Others Subseries contains articles and essays by Hubbell's colleagues and peers, as well as several essays that Hubbell collected on topics of interest to him. It also contains several memoirs which narrate the lives and influence of several key figures in the first generations of American literary scholars.

The Subject Files Series chronicles some of the major events, interests, and projects of Hubbell's career. His involvement with the Modern Language Association is represented by material filed in the General Files Subseries. Also included in this subseries is material concerning several of his institutional affiliations, including Clemson University, Columbia University, and Southern Methodist University (SMU). Hubbell's papers concerning his many professional projects can be found in the Projects Subseries, such as the Checklist of Manuscripts and the Center for Southern Studies. Information related to many of the subject files can be found throughout the collection, particularly in the Biographical Data and Correspondence Series.

Jay Hubbell dedicated a generous portion of his scholarly career to teaching and students. Besides his interest in different configurations and institutions for furthering learning and scholarship, Hubbell spent several years teaching abroad. The Teaching Abroad Series contains correspondence and incidentals concerning his service at universities in Vienna, Jerusalem, and Athens. This series includes materials which highlight Hubbell's experiences at the intersection of American foreign policy and university teaching, as Hubbell served as a Visiting Expert for the U.S. Army in Vienna as well as a quickly evacuated Visiting Professor in Jerusalem in 1956, during the Arab-Israeli conflict.

The Photographs Series includes photographs of Hubbell, family, and colleagues. The series includes portraits of Hubbell alone as well as with family.

The Clippings Series contains newspaper and journal clippings recording the many significant personal and professional events of Hubbell's life. The series also includes clippings about contemporary events, friends, and colleagues which Hubbell found noteworthy.

Hubbell's papers pertaining to English Department matters and committee assignments can be found in the Duke University Archives. The David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University houses many related collections, particularly in the Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography: the records of American Literature; American Literary Manuscripts; and the Modern Language Association's American Literature Section and Southern Literature Discussion Group; and the papers of Gay Wilson Allen, Sacvan Berkovitch, Cathy Davidson, and Arlin Turner.

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Joseph Jastrow papers, 1875-1961 and undated 6.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — approximately 1,015 items

Collection contains correspondence; lectures, speeches, prose, and poetry; published articles; book reviews; photographs and negatives; a scrapbook; and newspaper clippings. Subjects include the Jastrow family of Philadelphia and the Szold family of Baltimore, early psychology and psychophysics, the University of Wisconsin at Madison, Jewish society and Judaism in Baltimore and Philadelphia, and the Zionist movement. Correspondents include his father, Talmudic scholar Marcus Jastrow, and sister-in-law and U.S. Zionist movement leader, Henrietta Szold. Papers also include information on Joseph Jastrow's adopted son, Benjamin (Benno) Jastrow; a typed memoir, circa 1920, by Benno's biological father contains a moving account of the tragic outcome of the Spanish influenza epidemic (1918-1919), which led to the adoption of the infant Benno by the Jastrow family. Glass plates in the collection contain charts of symbols which may be results of experiments in involuntary hand movements, traced by his invention, the "automograph."

This collection contains the papers of Joseph Jastrow (1863-1944), a scholar and writer pioneering in the field of psychology, most of his career spent at the University of Wisconsin. It includes correspondence of Jastrow and his wife, Rachel (Szold) Jastrow, with their families, principally concerning family matters, but with references to affairs of the University of Wisconsin; Judaism in Baltimore, Maryland, and Madison, Wisconsin; and the Zionist movement.

Also included are photographs of the Szold and Jastrow families, and a set of glass plate negatives with charts of symbols, perhaps showing the results of experiments in involuntary hand movements, traced by his invention, the "automograph." psychology experiments.

There are manuscripts of Jastrow's lectures, speeches, prose and poetry; galley proofs of several articles; a diary kept during a vacation in Spain; a scrapbook containing copies of his articles and book reviews; a compilation of his early writings; copies of his articles in pamphlet form; and newspaper clippings.

Personal papers also include information on Joseph Jastrow's adopted son, Benjamin (Benno) Jastrow; a typed memoir, circa 1920, by Benno's biological father contains a moving account of the tragic outcome of the Spanish influenza epidemic (1918-1919), which led to the adoption of the infant Benno by the Jastrow family.

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Judy Juanita papers, 1967-2016 3 Linear Feet — 4 boxes; 1 oversize folder

Judy Juanita (b. 1946) is a poet, author, and teacher based in the San Francisco Bay Area. This collection includes drafts and other materials from her debut novel, Virgin Soul, as well as correspondence and subject files from her research and activism in the Black Panther Party.

The first series, Biographical Materials, contains material related to Juanita's public appearances, coursework, transcripts, resume, and personal correspondence. The MFA coursework contains early writing that she did under the name "Judy Hart."

The second series, Writing, is primarily made up of content related to her novel, Virgin Soul, and includes notes, fragments, rough drafts, character sketches, reviews, and financial information. Further writings include novel drafts, play scripts, poetry, and short stories. In addition to handwritten and typewritten drafts, many works contain final, published drafts.

The third series, Subject Files, includes research materials related to Virgin Soul, including the history of West Oakland and of San Francisco State University during the 1960s. Also in this series are notes on writings, interviews with Juanita, press clippings, and posters.

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Padgett Powell papers, 1972-2018 12 Linear Feet — 9000 Items; 34 boxes

Author and professor at the University of Florida. Published works include Edisto, A Woman Named Drown, Typical, Mrs. Hollingsworth's Men, and The Interrogative Mood: A Novel?. Collection includes writings and drafts of Powell's early novels, including Edisto and A Woman Named Drown, as well as essays, short stories, and articles for popular magazines and literary anthologies. Some of these appear in Typical, a collection of Powell's short stories. The collection also includes correspondence, publishing contracts, reviews, interviews, and travel files, many relating to the publication of Edisto.

The Padgett Powell Papers contains 4 series: Writings, Professional Materials, Correspondence, and Oversize Materials. The majority of the collection lies in the Writings Series, which includes drafts and publishing materials from Powell's books. The Writings Series also has a large run of Powell's "General Writings," which includes essays and articles for various publications, travel pieces, short stories (some of which later appeared in published books), and other drafts. These files may include multiple versions of the text, as well as correspondence with the piece's publisher.

Additional correspondence can be found in the Correspondence Series, which includes Powell's communications with editors, publishers, awards committees, and various literary figures. This series has been arranged to reflect Powell's initial arrangement: general and literary correspondence has been filed first, followed by an alphabetized subject and name file. Dates are included when known.

The collection's Professional Materials include both travel files, interview files, and some of Powell's academic work and records from his student days at the College of Charleston and at the University of Houston. The Oversize Materials series includes miscellaneous objects, usually related to publicizing or advertising Powell's readings or books.

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Poet and librarian, of Washington, D.C. Also sister of Jay B. Hubbell, Professor of American Literature, Duke University. The Ruth Ann Hubbell papers span the years from 1905 to 1986, with the bulk dating from 1926 to 1972. The collection consists mainly of correspondence between Ruth Ann Hubbell, her brother Jay Broadus Hubbell, and other members of the Hubbell family, but there are also some materials on the establishment of the Hubbell Center at Duke University, a small group of photographs, and folders of writings by Ruth Ann Hubbell, Jay Broadus Hubbell, Paul Edgar Hubbell, and other individuals. The collection is divided into six series: Clippings, Correspondence, Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography, Miscellany, Pictures, and Writings.

The Ruth Ann Hubbell Papers span the years from 1905 to 1986, with the bulk dating from 1926 to 1972. The collection consists mainly of correspondence between Ruth Ann Hubbell, her brother Jay Broadus Hubbell, and other members of the Hubbell family, but there are also some materials on the establishment of the Hubbell Center at Duke University, and some photographs and writings of Ruth Ann Hubbell, Jay Broadus Hubbell, Paul Edgar Hubbell (their brother), and other individuals. The collection is divided into six series: Clippings, Correspondence, Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography, Miscellany, Photographs, and Writings. These series are described fully below.

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Stanley Thomas Williams papers, 1921-1955 1.5 Linear Feet — 66 Items

Williams was a Professor of English at Yale University. The collection includes lecture notes, reprints, manuscripts and drafts.

Lecture notes on Brook Farm, James Fenimore Cooper, Benjamin Franklin, Washington Irving, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Herman Melville, and Henry David Thoreau, and American literature of the 17th and 18th centuries; reprints of articles and reviews by Williams; and manuscripts and drafts of Italy and the American Literary Pilgrim, and The Good and Great for Company.