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Sarah Wood Zine collection, 1990s 2 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Sarah Wood was the co-owner of GERLL Press, a zine distro based in Chicago, Ill., in the early to mid-1990s. The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Many of these zines come directly from the GERLL Press inventory, or were submitted to Wood and Curry by their authors to be considered for sale through the distro. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Bill Brown is a filmmaker, photographer, and zinester from Lubbock, Texas. His films explore the landscapes of North America, including the United States–Mexico border, North Dakota missile silos, and the Trans-Canada Highway, and have been exhibited at film festivals and museums around the world. He received a BFA from Harvard in 1992 and a MFA from CalArts in 1997. Brown is the author of a zine called Dream Whip as well as a novel on the underground in L.A., Saugus to the Sea. In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

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The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Ailecia Ruscin is a writer, activist, and scholar from San Antonio, Texas and Auburn, Alabama. She is the author or co-author of the zines provo-CAT-ive and alabama grrrl (published from 1997-2000).

The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Edwin L. and Terry A. Murray, brothers residing in Durham, N.C., have been collectors of comic books and other pulp culture for forty years. The Murray Fanzine Collection contains approximately 1150 comic book, science fiction and fantasy fanzines, collected by Edwin and Terry Murray, representing fandom in these genres from the early 1950s to 2019, as well as advertisements for fandom gatherings and conventions. The collection is organized into one series that is loosely separated into two sections: the first, and larger, consists of comic book fanzines ranging from the beginning of comic book fandom in the early 1960s to the retrospective volumes published in the early 2000s. The fanzines include reviews, advertisements and commentary, as well as biographical information on a variety of artists and writers, including Carl Barks, R. Crumb, Will Eisner, Steven King, Jack Kirby and Stan Lee. Though an assortment of superhero and comic strip characters published by DC, Dell and Marvel Comics, among others, are cited, one character in particular, Donald Duck, recieves more attention than the others. The second section consists of a sampling of science fiction and fantasy fanzines (including fantasy fiction) ranging from 1952 to the early 1980s, including information on artists and writers such as Vaughn Bode and Harlon Ellison. Most of the fanzines in the collection were printed independent of large scale publishing techniques, utilizing ditto, mimeograph, hectograph and, later, photocopy, on paper of varying degrees of quality. There are also three additional accessions (2010-0107, 2019-0078, 2019-0103), which have been minimally processed.

The Murray Fanzine Collection contains approximately 1150 comic book, science fiction and fantasy fanzines representing fandom in these genres from the early 1950s to 2019. The collection is organized into one series that is loosely separated into two sections: the first, and larger, consists of comic book fanzines ranging from the beginning of comic book fandom in the early 1960s to the retrospective volumes published in the early 2000s. The second section consists of a sampling of science fiction and fantasy fanzines ranging from 1952 to the early 1980s. Most of the fanzines in the collection were printed independent of large scale publishing techniques, utilizing ditto, mimeograph, hectograph and, later, photocopy, on paper of varying degrees of quality.

Boxes 349-367 contain those fanzines pertaining to comic fandom. The earliest examples represented in the collection date to the early 1960s, just after the very first comic fanzines had appeared, including Alter Ego, which is included here from issue 4, and Comic Art. Other notable titles included in the collection from this era (often referred to as the Golden Age of Comic Fandom) are Masquerader, Rocket's Blast/Comic Collector, Yancy Street Journal, Batmania, Comic Crusader, Gosh Wow! and SPA FON, as well as many others. Several of these issues contain photos and/or contributions from the Murray brothers, who had participated in comics fandom beginning in the mid 1960s. Fanzines dedicated to E.C. comics (such as Squa Tront, and E.C. Fan Journal), comprehensive indexing (such as Jerry Bails Authoritative Index to DC Comics and Guidebook to Comic Fandom, the MLJ Comic Index and The Comic Fan's Guide to Periodical Literature, which indexed early articles relating to comic books), conventions (such as the programs to the 1966 New York ComiCon and the 1968 International Convention of Comic Art, which is autographed by several of the artists in attendance), and amateur comic strips (such as Captain Biljo Comics and The Eye) are also represented from this era. Also included are issues 1-4 of Comics Review, which contain the first published fiction by Stephen King.

The era represented in the largest number is the 1970s, a time when the Murray brothers were very active in fandom, both in publishing as well as collecting. Though most of the issues represented in the collection from this era are single issues, some of the more popular titles, such as Bode' Bulletin, New Fangles, and In The Shadow of the Monolith, are represented in larger numbers. Trefoil and Vertigo, both published by Edwin Murray, are represented in full. As nostalgia became big business in the 1980s, comic books and comic fandom became more marketable. In turn, a much larger percentage of publications dedicated to comic fandom and collecting benefitted from a higher production budget. In addition, the proliferation of the photocopy allowed for a higher production number on a smaller budget. These changes are represented in the collection, from the glossy Disney collectables magazine Storyboard and the Fantaco Chronicles Series, to the photocopied Barks Collector, Duckburg Times, and The Stanley Steamer. Though none of the major fanzines/magazines of the late 1980s and 1990s, such as the Comics Journal, Wizard, and Comic Buyers Guide are represented, several of the retrospective books on Comics Fandom published by Hamster Press are included in the collection.

Boxes 368-372 contain fanzines relating to sci-fi and fantasy fandom, some of which are represented in both sections. Though not as complete a representation of the fandom of these genres as of the comics fandom genre, this section contains several of the top titles, including Don-O-Saur, Tolkien Journal, SF Commentary, Lan's Lantern, and Focal Point. Also included is a 1952 issue of Science Fantasy Bulletin published by Harlan Ellison, which was part of the initial wave of sci-fi fandom that was so influential to the beginnings of comic book fandom. It should also be noted that scattered throughout the collection are fanzines devoted to film, particularly horror and sci-fi films, as well as fliers (including one for the "first symposium on Donald Duck" held in the Geology department at Duke in 1970) and other assorted ephemera.

There are also three additional accessions (2010-0107, 2019-0078, 2019-0103), which have been minimally processed.

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Collection consists of Edwin and Terry Murray's collection of clipped comic strips from newspapers, including Blondie, B.C., Gasoline Alley, Gordo, Buz Sawyer, Apartment 3-G, Bugs Bunny, Archie, Mary Worth, Moon Mullins, Out Our Way, Judge Parker, Steve Canyon, Kerry Drake, Campus Clatter, Chief Wahoo, Priscilla's Pop, Green Beret, Hi and Lois, Boner's Ark, Dennis the Menace, The Jackson Twins, RIP Kirby, Wizard of Id, Smilin' Jack, Beetle Bailey, Popeye, and many others; as well as assorted full comics sections (also known as funnies) from American newspapers such as The Washington Post, the New Orleans Times-Picayune, the Overseas Weekly, the Detroit Free Press, The Chicago Defender, Asbury Park Sunday Press, The Durham Sun, The Durham Morning Herald, The Greenville News, and The News and Observer (Raleigh, N.C.). The bulk of the comic strips date from the 1950s through 1970s.
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Amy Mariaskin Zine collection, 1995-2005 3 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Amy Mariaskin began collecting and trading zines with other women as a member of the Pittsburgh, PA, Riot Grrrl Chapter from 1995-2002. She authored the zine Southern Fried Darling from 1995-2002, and Vortext, about meteorology and weather. Collection consists of about 150 zines, mostly self-published by women and girls in the United States. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, music, mental health, depression and mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, transgender issues, and race. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of about 150 zines, mostly self-published by women and girls in the United States. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, music, mental health, depression and mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, transgender issues, and race. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Sarah Maitland Zine collection, 1997-2009 4 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Virginia-based writer Sarah Maitland began producing zines around 2001 and ran a zine distro for about three years. She was a founder of the Richmond Zine Fest which started in 2007. Approximately 220 titles from Sarah Maitland's personal zine collection, most dating between 1998 and 2008 and discussing a wide range of subjects. Also contains some material from Maitland's personal projects, as well as buttons, cassettes, stickers, and other ephemera.

This collection contains approximately 220 titles (some with multiple issues) from Sarah Maitland's personal zine collection, most dating between 1998 and 2008. The zines are largely about women, feminism, sexuality, and personal stories; specific subjects include feminism, sexual assault, political activism, parenting, vegan recipes, racism, bisexuality, pop culture, television shows, love, sex, mental disorders, higher education, sizism, punk rock, sex dichotomy, transgender issues, and media. Also contains some material from Maitland's personal projects, such as promotional materials from the Richmond Zine Fest, as well as buttons, cassettes, stickers, and other ephemera.

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Rachel Hoff zines, 1990-1996 0.6 Linear Feet — 1 box

Rachel Hoff is an American author and librarian. Her papers contain the original copies of her zine Intelligence Lull that she wrote when she was 15 years old; as well as writings, drawings and correspondence related to this publication.

The Rachel Hoff papers consist primarily of original copies of her zine Intelligence Lull. The collection also includes writings, drawings and correspondence related to the publication.

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Arielle Greenberg is a poet, editor, and assistant professor in the English department at Columbia College, Chicago, Ill. This collection consists of 367 zines dated from 1973 to 1995, likely collected by the donor from 1992-1995. The collection primarily includes personal zines by women (though some are by men) that focus on the riot grrrl scene, feminism, punk music, and progressive political causes. Many of the zines include correspondence from the authors. The collection also includes personal correspondence and correspondence from zine authors between 1987 and 1995, with the bulk dating from 1993 to 1995.

This collection consists of 367 zines dated from 1973 to 1995, likely collected by the donor from 1992-1995. The collection primarily includes personal zines by women (though some are by men) that focus on the riot grrrl scene, feminism, punk music, and progressive political causes. Many of the zines include correspondence from the authors. The collection also includes personal correspondence and correspondence from zine authors between 1987 and 1995, with the bulk dating from 1993 to 1995. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Sarah Dyer Zine collection, 1985-2005 18.3 Linear Feet — 2050 Items

Approximately 2000 individual zines and nearly 800 titles, most self-published by women and girls 1985-2000. Most were produced in the United States, a few come from Canada and other countries. In-house database with subject access available. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, sexual abuse, music, mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, and erotica. The collection includes four audiocassette tapes and one VHS tape. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition #1 (2002-0319) contains approximately 150 titles.

Addition #2 (2006-0068) contains approximately 150 titles and are separated into two groups: those authored by women and those authored by men.

Addition #3 (2008-0030) contains approximately 175 titles and one VHS tape.