Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject Communism -- United States -- History -- 20th century Remove constraint Subject: Communism -- United States -- History -- 20th century

Search Results

collection icon
The Communist League of America (CLA) was founded in 1929 by James P. Cannon, Max Schachtman, and Martin Abern following their expulsion in 1928 from the Workers (Communist) Party. In 1934 the CLA merged with the American Workers Party to form the Workers Party of the United States. Collection contains correspondence, memoranda, internal party bulletins, financial reports and other documents relating to the activities of the Communist League of America.

Collection contains letters, memoranda, internal party bulletins, financial reports, and other documents relating to the activities of the Communist League of America (Opposition) and the publication of its newspaper, The Militant. Includes correspondence between James P. Cannon and Martin Abern and other party organizers including S. Gendelman in New Haven, Connecticut.

collection icon
Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Abraham J. Isserman was a labor lawyer, counsel to the American Civil Liberties Union during the 1930s, and one of the original members of the Board of Directors of Consumers Union. The Consumer Reports A.J. Isserman papers includes correspondence, clippings, court briefs and depositions, book manuscript drafts, photographs and other printed materials relating to Isserman's work in civil rights and labor law. Topics include labor union activities and strikes, civil liberties, communist influence, investigations into Un-American activities, deportation, and disbarment of lawyers. Persons and institutions reflected in the collection include the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, the Dies Committee, Judge Harold Medina, and Leinhard Bergel. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Consumer Reports A.J. Isserman papers include correspondence, clippings, court briefs and depositions, book manuscript drafts, photographs and other printed materials relating to Isserman's work in civil rights and labor law. Topics include labor union activities and strikes, civil liberties, communist influence, investigations into Un-American activities, deportation, and disbarment of lawyers. Persons and institutions reflected in the collection include the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, the Dies Committee, Judge Harold Medina, and Leinhard Bergel. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

collection icon
Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Colston E. Warne was an economist and consumer advocate who served as the first President of Consumers Union from its formation in 1936 until his retirement in 1980. The Consumer Reports Colston E. Warne papers include correspondence, clippings, photographs, scrapbooks, manuscripts and texts of articles and speeches, reports and other printed materials. Correspondents include Arthur Kallet, Dexter Masters, E. Scott Maynes, Edward Reich, James Mendenhall, James Morgan, Jean Whitehall, Leland Gordon, Morris Kaplan, Persia Campbell, Rhoda Karpatkin, Ruby Turner Morris, Walker Sandbach and William Pabst. Institutions represented include the American Council on Consumer Interests, Amherst College, Consumer Federation of America, Cooperative Distributors, Council of Economic Advisors, International Organization of Consumers' Unions (later Consumers International), League for Industrial Democracy, National Consumer Energy Advisory Committee, National Consumers League, National Recovery Administration and the University of Pittsburgh. Topics addressed include academic and intellectual freedom, communism and subversion, consumer and worker education, economics, labor and war-time advertising. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Consumer Reports Colston E. Warne papers include correspondence, clippings, photographs, scrapbooks, manuscripts and texts of articles and speeches, reports and other printed materials. Correspondents include Arthur Kallet, Dexter Masters, E. Scott Maynes, Edward Reich, James Mendenhall, James Morgan, Jean Whitehall, Leland Gordon, Morris Kaplan, Persia Campbell, Rhoda Karpatkin, Ruby Turner Morris, Walker Sandbach and William Pabst. Institutions represented include the American Council on Consumer Interests, Amherst College, Consumer Federation of America, Cooperative Distributors, Council of Economic Advisors, International Organization of Consumers' Unions (later Consumers International), League for Industrial Democracy, National Consumer Energy Advisory Committee, National Consumers League, National Recovery Administration and the University of Pittsburgh. Topics addressed include academic and intellectual freedom, communism and subversion, consumer and worker education, economics, labor and war-time advertising. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

collection icon

Revolutionary Workers League papers, 1935-1945 0.5 Linear Feet — 148 Items

The Revolutionary Workers League (RWL) was a radical left group in the United States active from 1935 until about 1947. The League was formed by Hugo Oehler in November 1935 following a split from the Workers Party (WP), a split precipitated by the party's decision to merge the WP with the Socialist Party. It published the Fighting Worker newspaper. Collection contains letters, memoranda, meeting minutes, party bulletins, financial reports, circulars, and other documents relating to the activities of the Revolutionary Workers League, 1935-1945.

Collection contains letters, memoranda, meeting minutes, party bulletins, financial reports, circulars, and other documents relating to the activities of the Revolutionary Workers League, 1935-1945. Also present are documents relating to the defense of Russell Blackwell, arrested in Spain during the Spanish Civil War.

collection icon

Will Inman papers, 1910-2009 69.5 Linear Feet — 42,754 Items

The correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, and printed material in the Will Inman Papers span from 1939-1999, and serve to document the life and literary career of the poet, essayist, editor, educator, and publisher.

Inman was a prolific corespondent and maintained regular correspondent relationships with his friends and family, as well as with his readers and other editors and authors. He also regularly wrote to political and social figures during the 1960s. These letters to public and political figures express admiration and voice concerns about political events and social conditions. Inman protested in favor of civil rights, ending the war in Vietnam, and various environmental causes, and his letters reflect his thoughts and opinions on these subjects. Inman was also in regular contact with the editors and publishers of various literary magazines and the letters to these individuals document his efforts to publish his work. The collection holds many of Inman's out going correspondence as he regularly kept copies of his own letters.

Inman's copious diaries provide almost daily detail of his life from 1950-1994. In his diaries Inman recorded daily events, poetic inspirations, and his responses to world events. The diaries also include information about the poetry he is working on and several include typescripts of completed poems.

Inman also kept detailed records concerning his completed writings. He kept typescript copies of his poems and other writings, ordering them chronologically into notebooks, and recording publication information onto the typescripts. In organizing this collection, Inman's notebooks were discarded, but the typescripts maintain the order they held while bound in the notebooks, and serve to provide a chronological overview of Inman's published and unpublished writings.

This collection also contains copies of several of the anthologies and literary magazines where Inman published his work and several of the poetic monographs that Inman authored.

Inman regularly published his early work in newspapers in North Carolina. The collection contains clippings of these early published works as well as clippings of Inman's mid 1960's newspaper column "Conchsounds in the Hills."

There are also photographs of the McGirt family from ca. 1910, chiefly mounted in albums, as well as Inman's baby book from 1923. (16 accessions from 1998 and 1999) (35,475 items, 59 linear feet; dated 1910-1999)

The addition (accession #2001-0195) (1676 items, 2.7 linear feet; dated 1940-2001, bulk 1976-2001) comprises mainly personal correspondence to and from Inman and Jimmy Santiago Baca, 1971-1995, including typescript poetry. It also includes typescript poetry by Inman as Bill McGirt, 1940-1956; other poetry by Inman; professional correspondence; and a journal kept by Inman, 2000-2001.

The addition (accession #2002-0143) (2250 items, 3.60 linear feet; dated 1982-2001) consists primarily of incoming and outgoing personal correspondence. Topics include Inman's poems, publication work, and his political activites. There is also poetry and prose by Inman and others, and 20 black-and-white and 148 color photographs.

The addition (accession# 2003-0124 and 2003-0181)(2775 items, 3.6 linear feet; dated 1957-2003, bulk 1970-1989) contains published and unpublished typescript poetry written by Will Inman. Also includes literary newsletters, periodicals and brochures; a notebook containing poetry, biographical information and professional correspondence; and a paperweight.

Addition (2009-0263) (500 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1976-2009) includes correspondence, poetry by Inman and others, press releases and reviews, official documents (such as his birth certificate, insurance information, and medical documents), and materials from Inman's death and funeral.

collection icon
The Workers League for a Revolutionary Party was formed by George Spiro in 1938 as the Leninist League. In the mid-1940s the party became critical of Leninism and Marxism and changed its name to the Workers League for a Revoluionary Party. The Party was a splinter group of the Trotskyist party, the Revolutionary Workers League (RWL). Collection contains letters, memoranda, meeting minutes, and other documents relating to the activities of the Workers League for a Revolutionary Party.

Collection contains correspondence, memoranda, meeting minutes, and other assorted documents relating to the activites of the Workers League for a Revolutionary Party and their publications, In Defense of Bolshevism and, later, the Bulletin. Topics discussed are mainly ideological in nature and include the break with the Revolutionary Workers League (RWL), Stalinism, Trotskyism, World War II, Unionism, and various party platforms. Political developments in Poland, Bulgaria, China, and Czechoslovakia are also discussed.