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Advertising Ephemera collection, 1850s-1980s 35 Linear Feet — 9,279 items

The Advertising Ephemera Collection is composed of single advertisements, product and trade catalogs, advertising pamphlets, and broadsides. The advertisements are primarily American and from the late 19th and early to mid 20th century.

The Advertising Ephemera Collection is composed of single advertisements, product and trade catalogs, advertising pamphlets, and broadsides. The advertisements are primarily American and from the late 19th and early to mid 20th century. The collection is divided into broad subject categories, based on the primary type of product or service being advertised, which are arranged in alphabetical order. Within each subject category material is divided based upon the form of the material; leaflets, letters, and sheets printed on both sides; trade cards (mechanical, metamorphic, see-thru, shape, fabric inserts, unusual feature, postcards and insert cards); booklets; special categories; and miscellaneous. A subseries of foreign advertising material consists predominately of travel related literature and is arrange alphabetically by country. The arrangement of oversize materials parallels the original arrangement.

The researcher should note that trade catalogs that are pamphlets may be found in several places in the Perkins Library: this collections; individually in the stacks as fully cataloged items; or as part of groups of old pamphlets for which the cataloging was by main entry only. Advertising broadsides may also be found in the Broadsides Collection and many collections of manuscripts also contain advertising materials.

Some useful reference sources for gathering further information on this type of material include:

Romaine, Lawrence B., "A Guide to American Trade Catalogs," 1944-1900 (New York, 1960).

Hammond, Dorothy, "Advertising Collectibles of Times Past," (Des Moines, Iowa, 1974).

Kaduck, John M., "Advertising Trade Cards," (Des Moines, Iowa, 1976).

McQuarry, Jim, "Collectors Guide to Advertising Cards," (Gas City, Indiana, 1975).

Additions to the collection have not been processed and therefore to do reflect the arrangement of the rest of the collection. Please refer to the detailed description below for more information about their content.

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The Evaporated Milk Association, organized by manufacturers in 1923, issued free publications promoting the use of evaporated milk throughout the United States. This collection consists of publications with recipes, scientific studies, and stories encouraging the consumption of canned evaporated milk. These pamphlets and booklets were donated to Duke University Libraries in the 1930s by the Evaporated Milk Association.

This collection originally arrived at Perkins Library as three binders of promotional materials from the Evaporated Milk Association. The materials have been transferred to Rubenstein Library and are no longer in binders.

The materials include both pamphlets and booklets covering a wide range of themes -- all relating to evaporated milk and targeting potential consumers. Topics include: recipes, both for regular cooking, desserts, and for preparing large quantities of food; studies and articles promoting infant feeding using evaporated milk; plays and activities for children centering on the emergency delivery of evaporated milk rations (among other supplies) to isolated areas; cost breakdowns of evaporated milk versus fresh milk, aimed at budget-conscious families; cartoons detailing the delicious flavor of evaporated milk; reprints of medical or scientific journal articles discussing evaporated milk's consumption in impoverished or malnourished communities, or by populations with various diseases; and articles about the history of evaporated milk, its manufacturing process, and general information about evaporated milk as a product. All of these pamphlets date from the pre-World War II period and are aimed at American readers.

The booklets and pamphlets have been kept in the order in which they were arranged in the binders. Dates are included when known.