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Barriner Family papers, 1921-1941 0.4 Linear Feet — 120 Items

Barriner family of Poplar Bluff, Missouri. Brothers Clyde Barriner and Woodrow Barriner were members of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Collection includes letters chiefly sent to Sarah Barriner of Poplar Bluff, Mo., from her children and relatives. Letters from her son Woodrow Barriner describe daily activities and camp life in Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Company 1727 near Powers, Or., from 1933-1934. Also included are letters from Clyde Barriner in Van Buren, Mo.; from Esther Payne in Sumter, S.C., 1940-1941; from Minnie Hanson of Piedmont, Mo.; and from Opal Hill. Family letters typically discuss social life in customs and hardships caused by the Great Depression.

Collection includes letters chiefly sent to Sarah Barriner of Poplar Bluff, Mo., from her children and relatives. Letters from her son Woodrow Barriner describe daily activities and camp life in Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Company 1727 near Powers, Or., from 1933-1934. Also included are letters from Clyde Barriner in Van Buren, Mo.; from Esther Payne in Sumter, S.C., 1940-1941; from Minnie Hanson of Piedmont, Mo.; and from Opal Hill. Family letters typically discuss social life in customs and hardships caused by the Great Depression.

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Bemis Lumber Company records, 1927-1941 27.5 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

Bemis was originally incorporated in the State of Delaware on April 16, 1926 and succeeded by the Bemis Hardwood Lumber Company, a North Carolina Corporation, incorporated January 1, 1937. Collection houses correspondence and financial records of the Bemis Lumber Company.

The Bemis Lumber Company Records span the dates 1927-1941, and document through correspondence files and other records the early decades of this large company's activities. Through these records, aspects of lumber milling, indutrial railroads and shipping, and the lumber trade in Graham County, western North Carolina, and the effects of the Depression on workers and their local communities, including Robbinsville, are recorded in varying degrees of detail. Topics covered in the correspondence, chiefly sent to officials of the company from other companies, organizations, and company workers, include but are not limited to: insurance coverage, tax issues, worker safety and accidents, unemployment, parts and equipment, and government regulations, particularly for shipping and railroad operations. There are a significant number of letters from unemployed laborers looking for positions. There are references to logging in other states as well. Other company records come in the form of financial ledgers, banking records, personnel records, coupon books for employees (perhaps to purchase goods at the company store), accident reports, inspection reports, insurance policies, receipts, real estate and earnings reports, railroad records for the shortline owned by Bemis, and bills of lading.

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Daniel C. Roper papers, 1860-1958 56 Linear Feet — circa 33,900 items

The Daniel C. Roper Papers, 1860-1958 (bulk 1933-1938), consist chiefly of professional and political correspondence, including telegrams and memoranda, but also include speeches, financial papers, clippings, invitations, legal papers, printed material, and pictures. The collection primarily documents Roper's term as Secretary of Commerce during the first administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In general the papers provide an inside look at this Democratic administration during the early depression years, as well as the relationships among business, government, and politics. In particular, Roper had close ties to people in the business community and was sympathetic to their concerns. In addition, the collection tracks the course of the New Deal in the Department of Commerce and the career of Roper not only as a United States government official in Roosevelt's cabinet but also as a progressive Democrat. However, there are some gaps in these professional files in that there is very little material pertaining to Roper's career prior to his appointment to the cabinet post. Also, files for 1931 are almost entirely missing, and cross-reference sheets in the collection prepared by Roper's staff appear to refer to a separate set of files missing from this collection. There is relatively little in the papers concerning Roper's personal life, except for financial papers.

Roper's tenure as Secretary of Commerce is primarily documented in the Alphabetical Series, which not only is the largest series but also forms the heart of the collection. His support of Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1932 presidential campaign probably helped him earn this cabinet appointment along with Roper's representation of the old Woodrow Wilson element in the Democratic Party. Roper set as a major task the development of mutual confidence, cooperation, and a closer relationship between business and government in order to bring about a recovery from the depression. Since he had been a tax expert and business consultant prior to becoming Secretary, this was a natural role for him. In fact in 1933 he had organized a Business Advisory and Planning Council for the Department of Commerce to advise the administration on the effect of the New Deal's proposals on business. After serving in the administration for almost six years, Roper resigned to return to private life.

The Alphabetical Series includes correspondence from a large number of prominent senators and congressmen, men in government service, businessmen, lawyers, judges, and New Deal figures. These include Bernard Baruch, James Byrnes, Patrick Callahan, James Cannon, Thomas Chadbourne, David Coker, Homer Cummings, Josephus Daniels, William Dodd, Ernest Draper, Robert Elbert, James Farley, John Garner, and W. Averell Harriman. Other correspondents are William Henry Harrison, Edward House, Louis Howe Cordell Hull, Clarence Hurrey, Jesse Jones, Hugh MacRae, William Gibbs McAdoo, George Milton, Robert Owen, Hollins Randolph, Lawrence Robert, L.S. Rowe, and John Humphrey Small. The Farley correspondence includes a run of first day covers, 1933-1938, while he was Postmaster General. Roper's interest in the stamps was piqued in part by the fact that he had been the First Assistant Postmaster General appointed by Woodrow Wilson. There are smaller amounts of correspondence with other New Deal figures, such as Harry Hopkins, Frances Perkins, and Harold Ickes.

Information on organizations and topics is scattered throughout the Alphabetical Series. They include aeronautics (in Aviation folder); American University; the Board of Education of the District of Columbia; commerce (in Foreign Trade folder); communication (radio and telegraph); financial federations, specifically The Community Chest of Washington, D.C.; the Democratic National Committee; the Democratic Party (in Politics folder); Duke University; the Export-Import Bank of Washington; and the Hindenburg accident. Others are the Freemasons (in Masons folder); Japanese Economic Mission to the United States; the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (also in Methodist Church and Mt. Vernon Place Church folders); the National Benefit Life Assurance Company; the National Recovery Administration; the Post Office Department; the presidential election of 1932 (in Politics folder); prohibition; religion and politics; Franklin D. Roosevelt; and temperance and liquor laws (in Liquor Control folder). Roper supported prohibition and in fact had served during the prohibition era as Commissioner of Internal Revenue in the Treasury Department, charged with enforcing liquor laws. There is information about agencies within or related to the Department of Commerce including the Business Advisory Council, the Bureau of the Census (in Census folder), the Bureau of Fisheries (in Fisheries folder), and the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce (in Foreign and Domestic folder). Other topics represented in the collection include the Boxing Bill; the Communications Group; the Inter-departmental Communications Committee (in Communications Committee folder), probably a precursor of the Federal Communications Commission; and a proposed National Advisory Council.

Roper's professional views are expressed in the Writings and Speeches Series primarily while he served as Commissioner of Internal Revenue and as Secretary of Commerce. The speeches address a number of domestic political and economic issues, including the relationship of business and government, government regulation, taxation, economic recovery from the depression, the U.S. Postal Service, and the role of government in society.

There is scant evidence in these papers relating to Roper's career other than that as Secretary of Commerce and his speeches as Commissioner of Internal Revenue. His autobiography, Fifty Years of Public Life in the Writings and Speeches Series, gives an overview of his career. There is some information on his career as the First Assistant Postmaster General in the Alphabetical Series in the Postmaster General file. In that series there is a little information in Internal Revenue Service folders about his resignation as Commissioner. In the Clippings Series there is documentation of his brief service as U.S. Minister to Canada in the summer of 1939. There is a scrapbook, "My Clippings of Their Majesties' Visit to Canada, 1939," and loose clippings pertaining to the visit.

Roper's personal life is not well documented in the collection except for his financial concerns as seen in the Financial Papers Series. The information in that series relates not only to the investments and bank accounts of Roper but to his wife Lou McKenzie Roper and their children. There is some additional information on the Ropers in the various Roper folders and in other scattered folders under various topics in the Alphabetical Series, and in the Legal Papers and Pictures in the Miscellaneous Series.

A photograph album entitled, "Sugar: Story in Pictures," concerning sugar growing in Santo Domingo appears in the Miscellaneous Series. In addition this series contains photographs of prominent statesmen and others, such as Bernard Baruch, the British Royal family, William Jennings Bryan, Grover Cleveland, Josephus Daniels, Averell Harriman, Harold Ickes, Eleanor Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson. An oil portrait of Roper is in the custody of the Special Collections Library. The Clippings Series includes scattered information on farming in South Carolina, especially cotton, African Americans, racial relations, tariffs, the presidential campaign of 1924 and William Gibbs McAdoo, and Roosevelt's cabinet.

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Isabelle Perkinson Williamson papers, 1827-1930, bulk 1909-1930 2.5 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — approximately 2,520 items

Correspondence and other items of Isabelle (Perkinson) Williamson, wife of Lee Hoomes Williamson, engineer, and of her mother, Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson. There are also letters from and items belonging to Lee H. Williamson. Topics include: life in Charlottesville, Virginia; students of the University; Edwin A. Alderman, University president; work in the Navy Department from 1913-1917; the early moving picture industry; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression. Includes descriptions of the Georgetown Visitation Convent, Washington, D.C., Europe during 1909 and 1910, Virginia, the Panama Canal Zone, Rancagua, Chile, and Puerto Rico. Papers relating to World War I consist of letters from soldiers and war workers; food cards; and letters from Mary Peyton, who was with a field hospital unit in France. The collection also contains information on early moving pictures; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression. Photographs - chiefly of family members and views from a Chilean mining settlement - and ephemera such as postcards, calling cards, tickets, and greeting cards round out the collection.

Collection comprises papers of Isabelle (Perkinson) Williamson, wife of Lee Hoomes Williamson, engineer, and of her mother, Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson. Included are many letters to Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson from former students of the University of Virginia who had patronized her boardinghouse in Charlottesville, Virginia, letters from Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson to her daughter describing life in Charlottesville, and commenting on Edwin A. Alderman, President of the University of Virginia, and many notes and bills reflecting frequent financial difficulties. Also included in this collection are letters between Isabelle P. and Lee Hoomes Williamson.

Many of the letters describe travels: letters from Isabelle P. Williamson to her mother were sent while attending the Georgetown Visitation Convent, Washington, D.C., while on a tour of Europe during 1909 and 1910, while visiting in Virginia and in the Panama Canal Zone, while working in the Navy Department in Washington, 1913-1917, and, after her marriage in 1917, while living near Rancagua, Chile, and in Puerto Rico with her husband. Also included in this collection are letters between Isabelle P. Williamson and Lee Hoomes Williamson.

The collection also contains information on the early motion picture industry; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression.

Papers relating to World War I consist of letters from soldiers and war workers, food cards, and letters from Mary Peyton, who was with a field hospital unit in France.

Sixty-nine photographs - chiefly of family members and views from a Chilean mining settlement - and ephemera such as postcards, calling cards, tickets, greeting cards, and Lee Williamson's WWI military identification card round out the collection.

Much more information on the collection's contents, written up in 1941, can be found in the Rubenstein Library cardfile catalog; please consult with Research Services staff.

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John B. McFerrin was a professor of finance at the University of Florida, as well as a past president of the Southern Economic Association. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, writing his dissertation on Caldwell and Company. McFerrin's book, Caldwell and Company: A Southern Financial Empire, was first published in 1939 and updated in 1969. Includes documents (the majority dating from the 1920s-1930s) gathered by McFerrin during the research and writing of his book Caldwell and Company: A Southern Financial Empire, and two copies of the book.

Includes two copies of John B. McFerrin's book, Caldwell and Company: A Southern Financial Empire, as well as supporting documents (the majority dating from the 1920s-1930s) gathered by McFerrin during the research and writing of his book. The materials represent a sampling of material from Caldwell and Company. Pre-financial collapse material consists largely of sales support, including information and literature meant for distribution by the Caldwell and Company salesmen. Topics range from municipal bonds, mortgage real estate bonds, securities and investment pamphlets, life insurance, and informational newsletters about Caldwell products. Post-1930 materials relate largely to the fallout from the financial collapse of Caldwell, including various court case briefs, indentures, a report from Lee Douglas and Rutledge Smith, Caldwell and Company Receivers, and a consolidated schedule with the financial records of the company and the Bank of Tennessee. Also included are newspaper clippings, dated 1896-1980; an article by McFerrin about the Kentucky Rock Asphalt Company; and other miscellaneous materials.

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Lawyer and U.S. Representative from North Carolina. Correspondence, legal documents, and other papers (chiefly 1850-1870 and 1912-1937) of John Humphrey Small; of his father-in-law, Col. Rufus W. Wharton, lawyer and planter; and of Col. David M. Carter, lawyer, planter, businessman, and court official, of Fairfield, N.C. Small's papers form the bulk of the collection and concern his North Carolina agricultural interests, his legal practice, his activities in Congress, river and harbor improvements, the Intracoastal Waterway, patronage, Southern financial conditions, U.S. and North Carolina politics, World War I labor problems, and the 1929 Depression. The papers before 1850 are mainly deeds, family papers, and legal documents. Wharton's and Carter's papers relate largely to the legal profession and to their agricultural interests.

Papers of John Humphrey Small (1858-1946), attorney, planter, and U.S. congressman, 1899-1921; of his father-in-law, Colonel Rufus W. Wharton (1827-1910?) attorney and planter; and of Colonel David M. Carter (d. 1879), attorney, planter, businessman, and court official of Fairfield, North Carolina. Arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Financial Papers, Legal Papers, Miscellaneous Papers, Printed Material, and Volumes.

The papers centering around Rufus W. Wharton and David M. Carter, principally legal and financial papers, include deeds and indentures; wills; inventories; estate and settlement papers; note collections; papers relating to the sale of corn by commission merchants; stock transactions; charter of the Dismal Swamp Canal Company, 1787; papers relating to the Albemarle Swamp Land Company, 1879, the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal Company, 1881, and swamp land transactions for Carter heirs, 1879-1890; papers dealing with the administration of the estate of David M. Carter by Rufus W. Wharton, and after Wharton's death, by John Humphrey Small; correspondence concerning lumbering and farming in North Carolina during the 1890s; and personal correspondence, including letters from Frances (Carter) Schaeffer from Germany, Austria, and North Carolina.

The bulk of the papers focuses on the career of John Humphrey Small in the United States Congress, his interest in the development of rivers and harbors and the Intra-Coastal Waterway, his membership on the National Rivers and Harbors Congress, and his legal practice. Papers relating to his congressional campaign in 1898 concern North Carolina politics, especially in the 1st Congressional District, civil service abuses, the Light House Service, and the vote of Populists, Republicans, Quakers, and Negroes.

Correspondence during his years in Congress discusses plans for a white grade school in Washington, North Carolina, 1903-1904; conditions of large scale farming at Edgewater, North Carolina, including descriptions of seeds, fertilizer, prices, machinery, crop conditions, and marketing, 1903-1912; problems of railroads, especially the Norfolk and Southern Railroad; the presidential campaign of 1916; coastal highway development; various rivers and harbors bills; the Inlet Waterway project; transportation via an inland waterway; the National Rivers and Harbors Congress; railroad and water transportation in relation to national defense during World War I; land acquisition and construction plans for the Intra-Coastal Waterway from Norfolk, Virginia, to Beaufort, North Carolina; problems of labor, including the movement for the eight hour day; labor shortages in eastern North Carolina during World War I; prohibition; woman suffrage; the National Guard; military service and the draft; coal shortages during the war; army camp sites; home guards; rising prices; excess profits tax; the Red Cross; various agricultural bills, national and North Carolina politics; a Congressional trip of inspection to the Far East in 1920, including Japan, Korea, and the Philippines; the Railroad Act of 1920; and routine matters such as patronage, post office appointments, appointments to West Point and Annapolis, and pensions for Spanish-American War veterans.

Correspondence after Small's retirement from Congress concerns the postwar economic depression; immigration legislation in the 1920s; the membership of the State Geological Board; the vice-presidency of the Atlantic Deeper Waterways Association; business conditions during the early 1920s and during the depression; condition of eastern North Carolina banks, 1920-1922 and 1932; Small's service as president of the National Rivers and Harbors Congress, 1920-1922; the promotion of the port of Wilmington, North Carolina, by the state; Democratic politics; the presidential campaign of 1932; the National Recovery Act; railroads in 1935; the development of airmail service; conditions during World War II; and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Other correspondence pertains to the opening and building of his law practice in Washington, D.C.; his partnership with Angus W. McLean, governor of North Carolina, 1925-1929; and specific legal cases. Miscellaneous papers consist of the minutes of the Tri-State Aviation Corporation, photographs, invitations, and Small's speech on the inland waterway.

Legal papers include the papers relating to various estates, including David M. Carter, Charles Adams, and others; papers concerning income tax; papers dealing with the development of Washington Park, North Carolina; papers pertaining to specific cases; incorporation papers of the Tri-State Aviation Company and All-American Aviation, Inc.; deeds, indentures and wills; and papers of the legal practices of David M. Carter and Rufus W. Wharton.

Financial papers include bills and receipts, 1830-1940, consisting of household accounts, clothing bills, promissory notes, tax receipts, court costs, estate inventories, medical bills for family and slaves, and records of slave sales; material on Confederate taxation; papers, 1870s, of a Baltimore, Maryland, cotton factor; records, 1880s, of corn sales; tobacco warehouse receipts, 1890s, from Greenville, North Carolina; business papers dealing with Jonathan Havens, Jr., commission merchant in corn and grain in Washington, North Carolina, and founder of the Havens (cottonseed) Oil Company and receivership papers of the St. Paul (North Carolina) Cotton Mills, 1939-1941.

Among the printed materials are clippings on the Depression, 1930-1934; personal items; biographical material on Senator Joseph E. Ransdell of Louisiana and on Rear Admiral Colby N. Chester; copies of the Greenville (North Carolina) Daily Reflector, December 27, 1913, and the Red Triangle, Paris, April 5, 1919; seed catalogues; reprints of the House of Representatives reports and bills on immigration, 1921, and airways, 1937; broadsides of the 1920 election; plan of organization of the Democratic Party in Beaufort, North Carolina, in 1896; the "Declaration of Principles" of the National Rivers and Harbors Congress, 1916, and its officers for 1916-1917; and a bond pamphlet for the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal Company, 1879.

The volume is the Individual Voting Record by Roll Calls in the House of Representatives for John H. Small during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd sessions of the 66th Congress, 1919-1921.

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Josiah William Bailey papers, 1833-1967, bulk 1900-1946 270 Linear Feet — 539 boxes — Approximately 422,400 itemss

The collection houses the personal and professional papers of Josiah William Bailey (1873-1946), Baptist layman, Raleigh attorney, and United States Senator. Chiefly consists of correspondence and print material, as well as smaller amounts of financial records, clippings, volumes, broadsides, photographs, and memorabilia dating from 1833 through 1967, with most items dating from 1900 through 1946. The collection documents Bailey's family, personal, religious, and professional life. Generally, papers prior to Bailey's election to the U.S. Senate in 1931 reflect North Carolina's legal, political, religious, agricultural, social, and economic issues. After 1931, material chiefly pertains to national affairs. Significant topics include: state and national elections and campaigns in the 1920s and 1930s; national defense and the military; veterans; the effects of the Depression on southern states and the U.S. economy and society in general; labor issues; Prohibition; the court system; taxation; the development of the Blue Ridge Parkway and other parks; agriculture in the Southern States; and the New Deal of the Roosevelt Administration. Legal papers offer a sample of case files from Bailey's law office, including a 1920s case involving W.V. Guerard of the Klu Klux Klan. Outgoing personal correspondence contains many references to national and regional issues as well as personal exchanges.

Collection comprises the personal and professional papers of Josiah William Bailey (1873-1946), noted Baptist layman, Raleigh attorney, and United States Senator. The material covers many aspects of Bailey's life and career and provides rich information on North Carolina and the United States in the first half of the twentieth century, particularly for the Depression years and World War II.

The papers are comprised chiefly of correspondence and supporting printed material, although there are also financial records, clippings, volumes, broadsides, photographs, and memorabilia, dating from 1833 through 1967, with most items falling in the period from 1900 through 1946.

The collection documents Josiah W. Bailey's family, personal, religious, and professional life and indicates the wide range of his intellectual interests throughout his adult years. Generally, papers prior to Bailey's election to the United States Senate in 1930 reflect North Carolina's legal, political, religious, agricultural, social, and economic issues. During the senatorial years, material pertaining to national affairs predominates. Topics chiefly relate to national defense, the effects of the Depression on Southern States and the U.S. economy and society in general; labor issues; prohibition; the development of the Blue Ridge Parkway and other parklands; the state and Supreme Court systems; agriculture in the Southern States; and the New Deal of the Roosevelt Administration.

The chronological division between the Pre-Senatorial Series and the Senatorial Series was established at December 31, 1930. There is occasional overlap among topical files within a series (such as that among Agriculture, Taxation, and Taxation: Revaluation in the Pre-Senatorial Series) or between series in some cases. When possible, cross references and other notes have been provided in the inventory. The researcher, however, should be aware of these relationships as they apply to specific research topics.

Much of Bailey's outgoing correspondence consists of form letters and perfunctory acknowledgments, but there are also many lengthy and articulate letters. It should be noted that the correspondence in the Personal Series is comprised mainly of family letters, many of which are informative about political issues of the day. Letters from Bailey to his wife, Edith Pou Bailey, and to his father-in-law, James Hinton Pou, are particularly informative.

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Sylvia Norton papers, 1926-1938 0.6 Linear Feet — 200 Items

Resident of Stockton and San Francisco, California. Collection consists of manuscript and typewritten letters, written primarily to Sylvia Norton from her family, dealing with their financial struggles during the Great Depression. Also contains manuscripts of poetry and short stories written by either Sylvia or Lillian Norton under the name (Frances) Elliott Norton. Correspondence with author and critic Laurence D'Orsay discusses Elliott Norton's writing abilities. There are also a few news clippings, legal documents, and some biographical materials. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of manuscript and typewritten letters, written primarily to Sylvia Norton from her family, dealing with their financial struggles during the Great Depression. Also contains manuscripts of poetry and short stories written by either Sylvia or Lillian Norton under the name (Frances) Elliott Norton. Correspondence with author and critic Laurence D'Orsay discusses Elliott Norton's writing abilities. There are also a few news clippings, legal documents, and some biographical materials.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Two related families living in La Monte (Pettis County), Missouri. Collection includes correspondence, photographs, financial and legal papers, poetry, cards, clippings, and genealogical information pertaining to the related Wheeler and Fleming families from La Monte, Mo. Photographs (circa 150) are mainly from the late 19th century; most are family portraits, but also include town businesses and rural scenes. Correspondence concerns crops and weather, church life, illnesses, family life, and primary school life in Bates County, Mo. (1899-1900). Includes a group of 100 letters (1908-1933) from R.A.S. Wade, a Missouri Methodist minister in California, who refers to Los Angeles area politics; church history; the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; the Masonic Home of California in De Coto, Ca.; prohibition and the temperance movement; World War I; the 1929 Depression; and the legal affairs of the Rev. J. P. Shuler. Some 100 pieces of poetry were also written by Wade and sent to the Wheelers. Genealogical materials refer to the Wheeler, Fleming, Kemp, Routsong, and McArtor or McArthur families. Collection also includes: a history of Methodist Church in La Monte, Mo.; calling cards and greeting cards; memorial booklets; land plats and deeds; records of the La Monte Woman's Missionary Society; school reports; insurance policies; and tax receipts.

Collection includes correspondence, photographs, financial and legal papers, poetry, cards, clippings, and genealogical information pertaining to the related Wheeler and Fleming families from La Monte, Mo. Photographs (circa 150) are mainly from the late 19th century; most are family portraits, but also include town businesses and rural scenes. Correspondence concerns crops and weather, church life, illnesses, family life, and primary school life in Bates County, Mo. (1899-1900). Includes a group of 100 letters (1908-1933) from R.A.S. Wade, a Missouri Methodist minister in California, who refers to Los Angeles area politics; church history; the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; the Masonic Home of California in De Coto, Ca.; prohibition and the temperance movement; World War I; the 1929 Depression; and the legal affairs of the Rev. J. P. Shuler. Some 100 pieces of poetry were also written by Wade and sent to the Wheelers. Genealogical materials refer to the Wheeler, Fleming, Kemp, Routsong, and McArtor or McArthur families. Collection also includes: a history of Methodist Church in La Monte, Mo.; calling cards and greeting cards; memorial booklets; land plats and deeds; records of the La Monte Woman's Missionary Society; school reports; insurance policies; and tax receipts.