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Blanche Simmons Diary, 1879-1880 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 Item

Blanche Simmons (1857/8-1941) was the daughter of Sir John Lintorn Arabin Simmons (1821-1903), Field Marshal and Colonel Commandant of the Royal Engineers, and his second wife, Blanche Weston. The collection consists of a single diary that records the events of two distinct trips taken by Blanche Simmons and her parents in 1879 and 1880. The first half of the diary documents a family vacation to Belgium and the Netherlands from September 19th to October 13th, 1879, with stops in Brussels, Spa, Utrecht, Amsterdam, The Hague, Rotterdam, Antwerp, and Ghent. The second half of the diary documents a trip to Berlin, Germany, from June 11th to July 9th, 1880, during which Blanche's father, Sir John Simmons, and Major Ardagh attended a conference in Berlin for "the settling of the Greek frontier" accompanied by Blanche, her mother, and their escort, Captain Wood.

The collection consists of a single diary that records the events of two distinct trips taken by Blanche Simmons and her parents in 1879 and 1880. The first half of the diary documents a family vacation to Belgium and the Netherlands from September 19th to October 13th, 1879, with stops in Brussels, Spa, Utrecht, Amsterdam, The Hague, Rotterdam, Antwerp, and Ghent. The diary describes the sights and the family's activities in these cities, in smaller towns, and on nature walks. Art museums and churches, as well as the headdresses and clothing worn by local women are described in particular detail. Many commercial albumen prints on card stock and dried plant specimens are affixed to the diary pages, and the entry for Friday the 3rd includes a humorous, rhyming poem relating events of the first half of the trip.

The second half of the diary documents a trip to Berlin, Germany, from June 11th to July 9th, 1880, during which Blanche's father, Sir John Simmons, and Major Ardagh attended a conference in Berlin for "the settling of the Greek frontier" accompanied by Blanche, her mother, and their escort, Captain Wood. As in the earlier vacation, commentary chiefly centers on sightseeing with an emphasis on museums, but also relates details of the conference, as recounted to Blanche, and describes several formal functions attended by her party, including receptions at the British Embassy and a small dinner gathering at the New Palace in Potsdam with Crown Prince Friedrick, Crown Princess Victoria of Great Britain, Prince Wilhelm, and Princesses Victoria-Augusta and Caroline of Schleswig-Holstein. Sights in Cologne, Dresden, and Aachen are also described, and the diary concludes with two humorous "Odes," one commemorating the events of the trip and the other, a twenty-three stanza piece written by Major Ardagh, on the Conference of Berlin.

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The Chris Costner Sizemore Papers span the time period 1952-1989, with the bulk of the papers dating between 1956 and 1979. The collection consists largely of correspondence; diaries and writings by Sizemore; publicity centered on film and book promotions or speaking engagements; materials related to her appearances; interviews and documentary materials (including film, video- and audiocassettes); and assorted materials including photographs, legal and financial papers. Most items relate to Sizemore's struggle with multiple personality disorder (dissociative identity disorder), both personally through letters, writings, and diaries, and publicly through interviews, documentary media, and news clippings. The papers provide an in-depth look into the life of a woman with a rare disorder who later came to clearly articulate her life to the public and become a mental health advocate. A biography was written by her doctors in 1957, Corbett Thigpen and Hervey Cleckley, called The Three Faces of Eve. It was turned into a film the next year. Under the pseudonym, Evelyn Lancaster, Sizemore co-authored The Final Face of Eve with James Poling in 1958. In 1977 she wrote, under her given name, the autobiography I'm Eve. The Correspondence Series is arranged chronologically, and consists primarily of incoming letters. Dr. Corbett Thigpen, the doctor to deliver the original diagnosis of multiple personality disorder, is prominent in much of the collection. This series documents his relationship to Sizemore during treatment and continuing well into the 1970s. He corresponded with Sizemore about his writings, revealing much about the publication of The Three Faces of Eve (book), and its subsequent movie release. The series also contains correspondence with other doctors, family members, Sizemore's editors and publishers, and organizations for which she lectured. The Writings Series is comprised primarily of the holograph manuscript, typescript, final galley proofs, and paperback edition of I'm Eve, the memoir written by Sizemore with the help of Elen Pittillo. This comprehensive view of the book's publication is represented from handwritten copy to final edition. The Writings Series also includes some short descriptions of Sizemore's life and examples of her poetry, as well as a few writings by others. There are six diaries in the Diaries Series, kept during parts of the 1950s and 1970s. Within these volumes, Sizemore discloses inner thoughts, which reveal very personal information about enduring mental illness and its effects on her family. The Publicity Series includes news clippings and journal articles about Sizemore and multiple personality disorder, as well as media related to her published works. The Events Series contains materials and ephemera related to Sizemore's public life of art shows, lectures, broadcasts, and appearances, often for mental health organizations. It also contains materials from her book tour for The Three Faces of Eve. The Photographs Series contains pictures from these events and of Sizemore's family life. The Additional Materials Series contains financial and legal papers, medical files, and identifying documents. There is also an Audio Visual Materials Series that contains interviews and documentary materials that again reflect the public's interest in Sizemore's life, as well as her own desire to document and share her experiences in writing, speaking, and art. Included is a documentary film by Dr. Thigpen, and video and audiocassettes of television interviews, other appearances, and of family members discussing a shared past (sound quality of some of the audiocassettes is very poor).

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E. Ireland was a mature, unmarried Scottish woman at the time she authored a series of travel diaries from 1916 to 1920. Collection consists of five volumes (686 pages) of an illustrated travel diary kept by E. Ireland, a mature unmarried Scottish woman, between 20 August 1916 and 28 February 1920. The diaries document Ireland's travels throughout the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Japan, South Africa, and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). Typical entries describe local inhabitants and customs, conversations with fellow travelers, and sites visited. Many entries include sketches, pasted in postcards, photographs, postage stamps, menus, passenger lists, and other ephemera.

Collection consists of five volumes (686 pages) of an illustrated travel diary kept by E. Ireland, a mature unmarried Scottish woman, between 20 August 1916 and 28 February 1920. The diaries document Ireland's travels throughout the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Japan, South Africa, and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). Typical entries describe local inhabitants and customs, conversations with fellow travelers, and sites visited. Many entries include sketches, pasted in postcards, photographs, postage stamps, menus, passenger lists, and other ephemera.

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Cataloged from item. Collection comprises a diary (124 pgs.) maintained by an unidentified woman who was educated, knowledgeable about sailing, and quite religious, during her voyages and travels around the northern coast of Scotland to cities in Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, England, France, and Spain.

Collection comprises a diary (124 pgs.) maintained by an unidentified woman who was educated, knowledgeable about sailing, and quite religious, during her voyages and travels around the northern coast of Scotland to cities in Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, England, France, and Spain. The diary began with a business trip, when she accompanied her husband (who was likely captain of the unnamed ship), from Workington, Eng., to Horten, Norway, in order to deliver a cargo of rails to the Norwegian government. The rest of the travel was apparently for pleasure. The author described ocean and weather conditions, with emphasis on dangers for ships; lighthouses; shipwrecks; landscapes; architecture; historic sites and ruins; castles; cathedrals and churches; palaces; paintings, sculptures, and artists; bridges and engineers; and gardens. She also commented on the inhabitants of and various practices in individual European countries, often in comparison to England, and with a particular focus on the women in each country. She made occasional literary references. More often she interwove her Evangelical beliefs into her descriptions, with references to the resurrection of the dead, comments on Protestant denominations, and strongly worded anti-Catholic sentiments. Includes visits to William Thorburn, who was then British Consul to Sweden; Antwerp's Cathedral of Our Lady; Waterloo battlefield; the Norman Cathedral at Durham; and the Castle site at Newcastle.

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Margaret Paton Diaries, 1849-1872 0.5 Linear Feet — 16 Items

Paton was the wife of a merchant from Montrose, Scotland. The collection includes sixteen diaries written by Paton between 1849-1872.

The collection includes sixteen diaries (1849 Oct. 1 to 1872 Dec. 31) kept by Margaret Paton, beginning seven months after her marriage and continuing with little interruption for twenty-three years. She chiefly records her thoughts and moods, how she spends her days, and various events such as the marriages and deaths of persons she knows. Many entries include information about her husband's activities and to a lesser degree her relationship with him. While sometimes recording events of national significance, she primarily focuses on private life and events at a local level.

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Mary McCornack Thompson Diaries, 1887-1962 2.4 Linear Feet — 96 Items

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Mary McCornack Thompson was an American Presbyterian missionary who spent over forty years (1889-1932) traveling and teaching in South Africa and Rhodesia. The collection contains diaries, and a few letters. Main subjects are missionary life and travel in Africa. Materials range in date between 1887-1962.

The Mary McCornack Thompson Diaries date from 1887 to 1962 and are arranged into two series: Diaries and Correspondence. The bulk of the collection consists of 90 journals that contain detailed accounts of Mary McCornack Thompson's work as a Presbyterian missionary and teacher with the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions in South Africa. During her 43 years as a missionary Thompson worked briefly at the mission station at Esidumbi in South Africa, but she spent most of her time at the Mount Selinda mission in the Melsetter region of Rhodesia ( Zimbabwe). In the diaries, Thompson wrote of her daily activities as a missionary, including building and expanding the mission, encounters with locals, learning Zulu, wildlife, meeting other missionaries, teaching and praying. These detailed entries offer a glimpse into the social conditions, race relations, and native cultures of various South African regions. Thompson also recounts her many travels throughout Africa, Europe, Asia, the United States, and Canada. Included in the collection is one folder of correspondence, mainly from William L. Thompson (Thompson's husband) regarding the collection and the transfer of Mary's diaries to Oberlin College.

The Diaries Series documents Thompson's almost daily activities between the years of 1887-1933, spanning all five of her missionary trips to Africa. Volumes 1-6 describe her first missionary trip (1887-1899), detailing her preparations for travel to Africa, her arrival, and her first encounters with native Africans. During this time Thompson married another missionary, William L. Thompson, and together they traveled for four months, mostly on foot, from South Africa to Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). They settled at Mount Selinda, which would be their home in Africa for the next forty years. Volumes 6-8 describe Mary Thompson's visits to the United States between her missionary trips, including taking cooking and photography classes, and traveling around the U.S.

Volumes 8-35 detail her second trip to Africa (1901-1910), during which time the mission at Mount Selinda began to expand rapidly. Thompson often writes about elections at the mission, as well as prayer services and sermons. She occasionally mentions world events such as the explosion of Mt. Pelee in Martinique, the Russian Revolution, and the detention of Queen Wilhelmina of Holland. She also describes her experiences with local natives who teach her the Zulu language. Volumes 35-40 cover Thompson's trip back to the United States in 1910. She describes lectures and meetings, and discussions on the outbreak of World War I. Her diary entries become less frequent during her stay in the United States.

Volumes 40-57 span her third trip to Africa (1911-1917), and entries tend to be bit longer and more descriptive. On this trip volumes 44-49 were written in diary volumes entitled "Warriors of Africa," whose covers depict African natives, and volumes 52-55 in volumes bearing the title "Empire Exercise," portraying historical events. Volumes 57 and 58 describe Thompson's travels during 1916-17 (at the height of World War I) to Hong Kong, Japan, Canada, and the U.S. Volumes 59-60 recount her time back in the United States; much of the content revolves around religious and political meetings on World War I, and the 1918 U.S. midterm elections..

Volumes 61-77 detail her fourth trip to Africa (1919-1925), and volumes 78-89 her fifth and last trip to Africa (1926-1932). Volume 80 does not begin until page 92, and is filled with various writing; some entries appear to be copies of diaries of historical figures. The diary entitled "Notes on Work at Moody Bible Institute" contains lecture notes, thoughts, scripture quotations, and observations by Thompson while attending a higher-education Christian organization, Moody Bible Institute, in Chicago in 1918, between her third and fourth missionary trips to Africa.

The Correspondence Series contains six letters regarding the collection and transfer of Mary McCornack Thompson's diaries after her death in 1936. The first five letters are from by William L. Thompson (Thompson's husband), to his nieces Margaret and Jay Urice, who are locating and collecting Mary's diaries. The sixth letter is from Jay Urice to Mr. Julian Fowler, a librarian at Oberlin College, about having Mary's diaries sent to Oberlin.