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Allen-Angier family papers, 1843-1971 8 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Collection contains correspondence, speeches, clippings, and printed material, chiefly relating to the career of George Venable Allen (1903-1970), diplomat, director of the U.S. Information Agency, and president of the Tobacco Institute. Includes material on the U.S. Foreign Service, the U.S. Information Agency, U.S. foreign relations, India, Iran, the tobacco industry, and the cigarette smoking and health controversy. Also includes family photographs from the Angier house on Trinity Avenue in Durham.

Collection includes papers kept by Zalene Allen Angier which include correspondence, 1936-1969, largely letters from her brother George Venable Allen (1903-1970), diplomat, official of the Tobacco Institute, and trustee of Duke University.

Allen's letters describe his diplomatic career and personal matters, including foreign relations and social life in Greece, Egypt, and Iran in the 1930s and 1940s; the royal family of Iran; the Potsdam Conference; and customs of Saudi Arabia. Letters of the 1950s mention celebrities Allen met, such as Yehudi Menuhin and Aristotle Onassis; and relations of the U.S. with India and of Russia with Yugoslavia. Letters of Allen's wife Katherine Martin Allen reflect diplomatic social life.

Clippings relate to Allen's career as diplomat and as director of the United States Information Agency, to his family, and to his death.

Miscellaneous papers include invitations; White House dinner menus; press releases; a report, February 9, 1932, on Japanese-Chinese relations; articles by Allen; and other printed materials.

There are photographs of Allen and many acquaintances, including Marshall Tito, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Jawaharlal Nehru, Amjad All, Abba Eban, Wellington Koo, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John Foster Dulles, and William Fulbright.

Papers, 1945-1970, kept by George and Katherine Allen include letters from Eisenhower and Dulles about Allen's shift from the State Department to the USIA; a report on the political situation in Iran, January 21, 1948; correspondence on Egyptian-U.S. relations in the 1950s and the Henry A. Byroade scandal, the Cold War, the cigarette smoking and health controversy, and on Allen's speeches.

Enclosed with a letter from Allen of May 10, 1970, is a petition against slavery by the Baptist Church of Augusta, Maine, dated August 17, 1843.

There are files of speeches and related correspondence on Russia, propaganda, the space race, foreign policy, peace, the tobacco industry, India, Iran, UNESCO, and other topics.

There is material on the Dulles and Eisenhower oral history projects and on various honors and awards received by Allen.

Two scrapbooks contain clippings about Allen's career and family photographs. There is also a photocopy of his book-length manuscript reminiscence of experiences as Ambassador to Iran in the 1940s and 1950s; a letter from Josephus Daniels, 1940, commenting on Allen's review of Daniels' book, Tar Heel Editor; and a tape recording of Allen's address, 1967, to the Tobaccoland Kiwanis Club on the United States in the world.

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William Boone Douglass was a lawyer, engineer, and surveyor, of Corydon (Harrison Co.), Ind. Collection includes correspondence, memorandum books, daybooks, notebooks on the Pueblo Indians, and other papers of Douglass and of various members of the Boone and Douglass families, especially of William's father, Benjamin P. Douglass, Indiana State Representative, and his son, William Boone Douglass, Jr., an official of the United States consular service. The letters pertain to the Kansas-Nebraska question, the passing of the first overland mail from California through Cassville, Mo., in 1858, elections to be held in Indiana in 1860, Douglass' surveying activities, establishment of a national park of the cliff cities of New Mexico, the securing of power from Boulder Dam, and other matters. Civil War letters from both Union and confederate soldiers are included; also an emancipation document for some enslaved people in Indiana Territory, designs submitted to the Patent Office, a biographical sketch of Douglass, and genealogical data on the Boone and related families.

Correspondence, memorandum books, daybooks, notebooks on the Pueblo Indians, and other papers of Douglass and of various members of the Boone and Douglass families, especially of William's father, Benjamin P. Douglass, Indiana State Representative, and his son, William Boone Douglass, Jr., an official of the United States consular service. The letters pertain to the Kansas-Nebraska question, the passing of the first overland mail from California through Cassville, Mo., in 1858, elections to be held in Indiana in 1860, Douglass' surveying activities, establishment of a national park of the cliff cities of New Mexico, the securing of power from Boulder Dam, and other matters. Civil War letters from both Union and confederate soldiers are included; also an emancipation document for some enslaved people in Indiana Territory, designs submitted to the Patent Office, a biographical sketch of Douglass, and genealogical data on the Boone and related families.