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Collection
Chief of Protocol and ambassador to Spain, Morocco, and Denmark under the Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter administrations; resident of New York, N.Y., Long Island, N.Y., and Washington, D.C. The collection chiefly consists of correspondence; scrapbooks and diaries; photographs; diplomatic papers; sound recordings and films; interviews, appointment books; clippings; printed material; and business papers, all documenting Angier Biddle Duke's life and career, especially his role in United States politics and diplomacy during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, as well as his philanthropic activities and his leadership roles in non-profit institutions. The materials also document the social and political activities of members of the Duke, Drexel, and Biddle families, and their residences in New York City and Long Island. In addition, the papers contain information on economic and social conditions in post-war Europe during Duke's ambassadorship to Spain, and information on Pakistani refugees and other international crises. Other topics include civil rights and desegregation (especially in Washington, DC).

The collection chiefly consists of correspondence; scrapbooks and diaries; photographs; diplomatic papers; sound recordings and films; interviews, appointment books; clippings; printed material; and business papers, all documenting Angier Biddle Duke's life and career, especially his role in United States politics and diplomacy during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, as well as his philanthropic activities and his leadership roles in non-profit institutions. The materials also document the social and political activities of members of the Duke, Drexel, and Biddle families, and their residences in New York City and Long Island. In addition, the papers contain information on economic and social conditions in post-war Europe during Duke's ambassadorship to Spain, and information on Pakistani refugees and other international crises. Other topics include civil rights and desegregation (especially in Washington, DC).

Details on Angier Biddle Duke's life as well as information on the Duke, Biddle, and Drexel families can be found in the Biographical Data Series. These materials include some of A.B. Duke's military records; articles on A.B. Duke; articles and biographical entries on A.B. Duke; "in memoriam" booklets from his first wife's funeral and the funeral of Angier Buchanan Duke, A.B. Duke's father; and genealogical materials on the families. Selected condolences out of the hundreds sent to Robin Chandler Duke after her husband's death in 1995 also reveal much about the personality and life of A.B. Duke. In addition, the narratives in the Diaries Series offer a great deal of material concerning the personalities of A.B. Duke and his family and acquaintances throughout his life.

The Correspondence Series also offers information on the Duke, Biddle, Semans, and Trent families, though correspondence between immediate family members makes up a small percentage of this large series. The correspondence files are most useful for the documentation they provide about A.B. Duke's career. Additional biographical data on A.B. Duke and family members, particularly useful for information on Robin Chandler Duke's social and political activities, can be found in the Clippings Series.

The Photograph Albums and Photographs Series contains hundreds of photographs of the Duke, Semans, and Biddle families. Some early photographs of Angier Biddle Duke were taken during his enlistment in the Army from 1940-1945. An album entitled "A celebration of the life of Benjamin Newton Duke, 1979" can be found in the Scrapbooks Series. Finally, as A.B. Duke served as president of the Duke Family Association of NC from 1988-1995, there are a number of items related to the meetings of this genealogical association found in the Correspondence Series.

Angier Biddle Duke was best known for his ambassadorial skills and his political acumen beginning with his appointment to the office of Ambassador to El Salvador in 1952 as the youngest ambassador ever appointed to a post. His subsequent career in diplomacy and politics, including his appointment as Chief of Protocol under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, is well-documented throughout the majority of the series. A series of written and taped diaries entitled the "Ambassador's Diary" are especially interesting for A.B. Duke's candid reflections on his experiences.

The political and social events of the 1960s and 1970s are well-represented in the papers in the multimedia formats associated with the Audio, Film, and Videotape Series, containing numerous recordings of speeches, toasts, and visits of foreign dignitaries; the Scrapbooks and Photograph Albums and Photographs Series, which hold many candid and formal photographs of politicians, diplomats, celebrities, and artists; and the Clippings Series. One scrapbook covers President Kennedy's trip to Berlin, West Germany; another oversize scrapbook covers an international incident at Palomares, Spain (1966): while Duke was that country's ambassador, an undetonated U.S. nuclear bomb was lost off the coast of Spain, then recovered after an increased international outcry against nuclear weapons. Materials in the Protocol Papers Series also concern Kennedy's assassination and the transition to a Johnson White House during the period when A.B. Duke was Chief of Protocol. As Jacqueline Kennedy had already become a good friend of A.B. Duke's family, there are items in the Correspondence Series reflecting her close relationship with them in the difficult years after her husband's assassination.

The head of the State Department Office of Protocol serves as principal adviser to the President and Secretary of State on matters of diplomatic procedures governed by law or international customs and practice. Angier Biddle Duke's responsibilities as Chief of Protocol from 1961-1965 and 1968, including his role in the arrangements for the Kennedy funeral, are best represented by materials in the Protocol Papers Series, arranged alphabetically by country, and by many valuable letters and telegrams in the Correspondence Series, and in the Writings and Speeches Series. In addition, a great deal of relevant information, both contemporary and retrospective in nature, can be found in the Interviews Series. Several important volumes in the Scrapbooks and Diaries Series are also were created as records of his tenure as Chief of Protocol, and the Pictures Series contains many candid and formal photographs during this period. Finally, events relating to the Office of Protocol are found in audio or film format in the Audio, Film, and Video Series. Memorabilia from this period such as invitations, dinner menus, guest lists, and souvenir programs from inaugurations abroad can also be found in the Miscellaneous Series.

A.B. Duke's extensive organizational activities in later decades are documented in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Interviews, Printed Materials, and Writings and Speeches Series. A large number of materials reflect A.B. Duke's long involvement in the administration of Long Island University as well as in other institutions such as the International Rescue Commission, various Democratic committees, CARE, the NYC Dept. of Civic Affairs and Public Events, the Spanish Institute, the Appeal to Conscience Foundation, the Japan-American Institute, the World Affairs Council, and the American Council of Ambassadors, and many others. The Subject Files and other series also illustrate A.B. Duke's later involvement in organizations attempting to establish more democratic structures in countries such as El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Guyana.

Some materials also reflect Robin Chandler Duke's later involvement in politics, including her unsuccessful bid for the Democratic nomination to fill Koch's congressional seat in 1978, and her role as chairwoman of Population Action International.

Although they contain relatively few documents, the Legal and Financial Papers provide some information on A.B. Duke's income and financial activities, and on the Doris Duke Trust; also in the legal papers is a publisher's contract for the biography of Doris Duke and a copy of Angier Buchanan Duke's will. Other legal and financial matters related to the Duke and Biddle families, particularly the Doris Duke estate (1995) are referred to on a regular basis in the Correspondence Series. Very little is to be found in the collection on the administration, maintenance, or acquisition of Angier Biddle Duke's residences in Washington, NYC, or Long Island, though some illustrations of residences can be found in the Clippings and Pictures Series.

Collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library which contain information relevant to the Angier Biddle Duke Papers include the James Buchanan Duke Papers and especially the Semans Family Papers. The Duke University Living History Program collection, also in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, contains an interview with Angier Biddle Duke recorded in the 1970s.

Collection

Hugh Gladney Grant papers, 1847-1939 15 Linear Feet — 7200 Items

U.S. Minister to Albania, 1935-1939. With the exception of his diary, these papers are largely Grant's correspondence and other records from his service as U.S. Minister to Albania, 1935-1939. His extensive diary covers this period, but most of it, as does some of his correspondence and other records, covers the period (1927-1933) while he was secretary to Sen. Hugo L. Black. Other topics covered in detail include the roles of Senators Heflin and Black, Alabama and National Democratic politics, the Depression, particularly in Alabama, the Bonus March on Washington in 1932, Albania and its King Zog, administration of the U.S. Legation in that country, and the rise of Mussolini and Hitler. In his diary, he gives opinions of many people, including Senator Black, Neville Chamberlain, King Zog, and Charles Lindbergh. Between 1933 and 1935, he was in the Division of Western European Affairs in the Department of State, and that service is also covered in this collection. A collection of photographs of Albania, various other places, and some family photos are included. There are a few clippings, and some personal correspondence of Grant and of Mrs. Hugh G. Grant.

With the exception of his diary, these papers are largely Grant’s correspondence and other records from his service as U.S. Minister to Albania, 1935-1939. His extensive diary covers this period, but most of it, as does some of his correspondence and other records, covers the period (1927-1933) while he was secretary to Sen. Hugo L. Black. Other topics covered in detail include the roles of Senators Heflin and Black, Alabama and National Democratic politics, the Depression, particularly in Alabama, the Bonus March on Washington in 1932, Albania and its King Zog, administration of the U.S. Legation in that country, and the rise of Mussolini and Hitler. In his diary, he gives opinions of many people, including Senator Black, Neville Chamberlain, King Zog, and Charles Lindbergh. Between 1933 and 1935, he was in the Division of Western European Affairs in the Department of State, and that service is also covered in this collection. A collection of photographs of Albania, various other places, and some family photos are included. There are a few clippings, and some personal correspondence of Grant and of Mrs. Hugh G. Grant.

Collection

Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry papers, 1854-1931 3 Linear Feet — 736 Items

Statesman, author, clergyman, diplomat, and educator, of Richmond, Va. Chiefly letters relating to Curry's career in education and diplomacy after the Civil War. Most of the letters were written by Curry to his son Manly Bowie Curry, giving him advice and discussing family matters and political and social questions. Includes two letter books covering the period of his envoyship to Spain and containing comments about Spanish customs and government. Also, a typewritten journal kept by M. B. Curry while serving with the United States Marine Corps in Nicaragua, 1930-1931.

The major part of the collection is the correspondence of J. L. M. Curry with his son, Manly Bowie Curry, mainly in the years 1884-1903. The correspondence is personal, for the most part, but there are occasional references to Curry's career in education. The collection also contains two letter books covering a portion of the time Curry served as United States minister to Spain (1885-1888) which have extensive observations on Spain, its rulers, customs, and environment; a few items of correspondence with relatives; newspaper clippings; photographs of the Curry family and of the Philippines; and a typewritten journal kept by Manly Lamar Curry while serving with the United States Marine Corps in Nicaragua, 1930-1931.