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Collection
Anola Victoria "Peter" Mudie was a radio announcer and amateur photographer who hosted a long-running (1936-1961) radio show, Consumer News, on the KOIN station in Portland, Oregon, hosted by Fred Meyer grocery chain. Scrapbook consists primarily of black-and-white and color photographs, but also includes pamphlets, news clippings, cartoons and holiday/anniversary cards and announcements. Subjects depicted in the photographs include boxers, docks and ports (ships moored, cargo loading), grocery and retail operations and employees, labor union members primarily during the 1948 Longshoreman's strike, photographic processing operations, and warehouse workers. Companies and institutions represented include Fred Meyer, ILWU, KOIN radio and Mitchell Bros. trucking. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Scrapbook consists primarily of black-and-white and color photographs, but also includes pamphlets, news clippings, cartoons and holiday/anniversary cards and announcements. Subjects depicted in the photographs include boxers, docks and ports (ships moored, cargo loading), grocery and retail operations and employees, labor union members primarily during the 1948 Longshoreman's strike, photographic processing operations, and warehouse workers. Companies and institutions represented include Fred Meyer, ILWU, KOIN radio and Mitchell Bros. trucking. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection
Collection contains 28 color prints from Debi Cornwall's project "Gitmo at Home, Gitmo at Play/Beyond Gitmo." The project pairs images from two series. The first, "Gitmo at Home, Gitmo at Play" was made during three visits to the base in 2014-2015. The series "Beyond Gitmo" consists of environmental portraits of 10 men once held at Gitmo who have since been cleared of charges and freed.

Debi Cornwall's project "Gitmo at Home, Gitmo at Play/Beyond Gitmo" is the winner of the 2016 Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Women Documentarians. The ADA Collection Awards were established to diversify the ADA’s collection in order to better reflect the multitude of viewpoints and communities from which work is being made in the documentary arts today.

Cornwall included the following abstract about her work:

My work on Guantánamo Bay, Cuba employs a new documentary language to invite a fresh look at an inaccessible American subject, as the 15th anniversary of September 11 approaches. Military authorities limit media access to the U.S. Naval Station at “Gitmo,” and strictly regulate what may be photographed. This is a place where nobody has chosen to live, and where photographs of faces are prohibited. This project, in turning away from the expected imagery and instead exploring residential and leisure spaces of both detainees and those who guard them, offers a unique perspective daily life for both groups, as well as evolving notions of “American-ness.”

For this submission, I pair images from the series, Gitmo at Home, Gitmo at Play, made during three visits to the base in 2014-15, with environmental portraits of 10 men once held at Gitmo, after they have been cleared and freed, from the series, Beyond Gitmo. Over the last year, I photographed released men in 9 countries (from Albania to Qatar), some having returned home, and others displaced to third countries where they do not speak the language. With each man, I collaborated to create photographs reflecting his experience of indefinite detention, displacement and disorientation. Each image replicates, in the free world, the military’s “no faces” rule: their bodies may be free, but the trauma remains figuratively and literally embodied. Guantánamo Bay will always mark them.

My visual work is deeply informed by my 12 years working as a civil rights lawyer on behalf of innocent exonerees in the United States. As in my prior casework, this series seeks to unpack what is, essentially, invisible, in both the systemic – the peculiar institutions we have established in the wake of 9/11 – and the very personal impact those institutions have on individuals. My emphasis is dislocation. The released men I photographed have experienced years if not decades of trauma, and are having various levels of success as they struggle to rebuild their lives. From my past work as an advocate representing those cleared and freed from United States prisons, I know that the thrill of being photographed upon release too often leads to confusion and resentment when the attention fades. Thus, rather than seeking access to their most intimate moments as in classic documentary, I honor their boundaries. Now they have the agency to choose. Instead, my conceptual frame–replicating Gitmo’s “no faces” rule, and collaborating with each released man to select meaningful locations–speaks to the emotional experience differently. At the same time, my visual strategy emphasizes the larger truth that even in freedom these men remain stigmatized, fundamentally disconnected from their social environments. By employing this distinct visual language (carried through from Guantánamo into its diaspora), my goal is to engage viewers in a manner that disrupts the typical subject/object power dynamic of documentary between those who look and those who are seen. My goal is to engender a visceral experience of the profound disorientation of Guantánamo’s alumni, one that may enable viewers to identify with, rather than distancing themselves from or merely empathizing with, these men.

Collection

DoubleTake records, 1908-1999, bulk 1994-1999 53.1 Linear Feet — Approximately 58,872 Items

The DoubleTake magazine records contain story manuscripts with editor's markings, correspondence, photographs and slides, and production files for issue numbers 1-16, 1994-1999. Files of editors Jay Woodruff, Rob Odom, and other editors contain correspondence with writers whose work they were interested in publishing and editing. There are postcards and transparencies used in various issues; and a complete run of the magazine through spring 1999. There are two unidentified files. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection holds story manuscripts (with editor's marks), correspondence, and production files for issues 1-16, 1994-1999. Files of editors Jay Woodruff, Rob Odom, and other editors contain correspondence with writers whose work they were interested in publishing and editing. There are postcards and transparencies used in various issues; and a complete run of the magazine through spring 1999. There are two unidentified files.

Later accessions include production files and correspondence between the magazine's editors and its contributors, also covering issues 1-16.

Accession 2010-0081 includes photographer name files, dating from 1993 (pre-production) through 1998, kept by Alex Harris and other DoubleTake staff. Files were created whenever a photographer corresponded with the magazine, and include copies of correspondence between editors and photographers, slides of sample work, contracts for those who were accepted as contributors, and occasional biographies or other information about the photographer. Some files represent a particular museum's exhibit rather than a personal photographer; these are designated with exhibit titles instead of a photographer's name.

Files are organized alphabetically, and include correspondence from well before the magazine began publication, as well as materials post-dating Harris's departure from the magazine.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Emmet Gowin photographs, 1972-2008 0.5 Linear Feet — 2 Items

American photographer and Professor of Visual Arts in the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University. Co-author, with Elijah Gowin, of Maggie, published by Tin Roof Press in 2008. Collection consists of 2 signed 8x10 gelatin silver photographs, originally included in the publication of Maggie. The edition, available in Lilly Library at Duke University, was Number 7 of a Special Edition of Twenty-five, September 2008.

Collection consists of 2 signed 8 x 10 gelatin silver photographs, originally included in the publication of Maggie. They have been separated from the book due to preservation concerns. The monograph Maggie, available in Lilly Library at Duke University, was Number 7 of a Special Edition of Twenty-five, published by Tin Roof Press, September 2008.

The prints are sleeved together in a custom envelope matching the book.

Collection

James Ware Pitts photographs, 1984-1998 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 5 prints — 5 prints

Collection comprises five 4x5 inch matted black-and-white palladium contact prints, featuring abandoned or run-down manmade structures in the natural landscape. Locations include the Southwest (Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona) and the Olympic Pensinsula. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.
Collection
Jeanine Michna-Bales is a conceptual documentary photographer based in Dallas, Texas. Her series "Through Darkness to Light: Seeking Freedom on the Underground Railroad" won the 2016 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of the American South. The project comprises 40 color photographs of a route taken by travelers on the Underground Railroad between 1800 and the end of the Civil War. Michna-Bales researched the route over a decade and photographed the locations between 2012 and 2015.

The Jeanine Michna-Bales photographs comprise her series "Through Darkness to Light: Seeking Freedom on the Underground Railroad," which won the 2016 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of the American South. The series contains (39) 17"x24.5" color photographs printed on 21"x28.5" paper and (1) 17"x70.75" panoramic photograph printed on 21"x74.75" paper. Images are digital chromogenic prints printed on Kodak Endura Lustre paper printed in 2016 by Steve Clayton at Holland Photo Imaging in Austin, Texas.

Michna-Bales provided the following abstract of her work:

They left during the middle of the night – oftentimes carrying little more than the knowledge that moss grows on the northern side of trees. An estimated 100,000 slaves between 1800 and the end of the Civil War chose to embark on this journey of untold hardships in search of freedom. Fugitives traveled roughly 20 miles each night traversing rugged terrain while enduring all the hardships that Mother Nature could bring to bear. Occasionally, they were guided from one secret, safe location to the next by an ever-changing, clandestine group known as the Underground Railroad. From a cotton plantation in Louisiana all the way north to Canada, this series of photographs can help us imagine what the long road to freedom may have looked like as seen through the eyes of one of those who made this epic journey.

The documented route took over a decade to piece together. Images were captured digitally over a three-year period starting in the Fall of 2012. The images have been displayed with found text from the time period, such as quotes from various participants, to help give the viewer a better understanding of circumstances surrounding a person’s journey to freedom.

Collection

Jennette Williams photographs, 2000-2006 4 Linear Feet — 14 Items

Documentary photographer and instructor at the School of Visual Arts in New York. Fourth recipient of the biennial Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography in 2008. (Acc. 2009-0141, 2009-0245, and 2009-0246) (14 items; 4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2006) includes 10 (20x24) platinum/palladium contact prints and 3 (20x24) pigment ink on rice paper images from Williams' book, The Bathers, featuring women bathing and lounging in Turkish and Hungarian bathhouses. Also includes a CD of an artist talk given by Williams at an exhibit opening in 2009. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts (Duke University).

Collection includes 13 prints from The Bathers, Williams' winning entry for the Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize. Prints are 20x24, and feature women bathing and lounging in steam rooms and bathhouses in Istanbul and Budapest. Ten of the images are platinum/palladium contact prints, and the remaining three are pigment ink on rice paper.

This collection also includes a CD with an artist talk, given by Williams at the opening of the Duke exhibit of The Bathers in 2009. This item has been transferred to Duke's electronic server.

Collection

Literacy Through Photography records, 1990-2009 4.8 Linear Feet — 2800 Items

The Duke University Center for Documentary Studies Literacy Through Photography Records comprise negatives, contact sheets, and written work (generally handwritten or printed observations, comments, stories, poems, drawings) documenting school children’s views of their community, Durham, NC. The materials would be useful to those interested in visual culture, the psychogeography of children, and Durham history, society and living environment, as well as those interested in pedagogy and developing an arts-based curriculum in public schools. The units collected and organized in the Records are LTP class projects, sorted first by format, then chronologically.

Along with the physical negatives, contact sheets, and writings transferred to the Rubenstein Library in 2002, LTP coordinators provided detailed supplementary information about the compilation, organization, and selection process of the collection, as well as a finding aid in the form of an Excel database. The Excel file is a master database of individual student projects organized by year, and sortable by other variables; the database is accessible electronically at the Rubenstein Library. A print copy of the database and other supporting documentation is also available in the RMBSCL inventory file, and should be consulted by patrons using this collection.

The collection also includes 56 exhibit-quality color prints of LTP in Tanzania include images of children learning to use digital cameras, demonstrating their literacy skills, and exhibiting their projects. Also includes images of some volunteers, LTP staff, and Tanzanian teachers.

Collection

Margaret Sartor photographs and papers, 1966-2003 14.5 Linear Feet — 545 Items

Margaret Sartor is a photographer and instructor at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies. Her Photographs and Papers collection includes photographs of the American South, and some materials from her book project on William Gedney.

The 2001 Accession (2001-0074) (260 items; 9 lin. ft.; dated 1985-2000) contains black-and-white prints (16x20 and 11x14) by Sartor, focusing especially on home, family, and suburban life in the American South.

The 2002 addition (02-083) (38 items, 3 lin. ft.; dated 1984-2001) contains thirty-eight 16x20 black-and-white photographs printed by Sartor in 2001 from negatives shot 1984-2001. Focus is on home, family, and suburban life in the American South.

The 2003 addition (03-121) (47 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1987-2003) comprises forty-seven exhibition quality black-and-white 16x20 prints by Sartor, shot between 1987 and 2003, but mostly printed in 2002 and 2003. Subjects include women and family in the suburban South.

The 2015 addition consists of materials relating to Sartor's book, What Was True: The Photographs and Notebooks of William Gedney, published in 2000. This materials has been arranged into a Book Projects series.

Collection
San Francisco-based photographer Paccarik Orue was born and raised in Lima, Peru. His series "El Muqui" won the 2016 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of Color. "El Muqui" comprises 40 color photographs taken between 2012 and 2014 in the Peruvian mining city Cerro de Pasco. The photographs document life in the city, which "due to economic interests and expansion of the mine, [is] doomed to disappear." He writes "it was essential to find myself and reconnect with my Peruvian roots and heritage...and gives me the opportunity to continue making work of social relevance."

The Paccarik Orue Photographs contain his photography portfolio "El Muqui," which won the 2016 Archive of Documentary Arts Collection Award for Documentarians of Color. The project contains (40) 14x14” color prints printed using an Epson 7890 printer and Epson Ultrachrome K3 ink on Ilford Galerie Prestige Gold Fibre Silk from 6x6 scans of 120 Kodak Portra 400 film.

Orue provided the following abstract of his work:

El Muqui

Cerro de Pasco is an historical city of 80,000 people in the Peruvian Andes, situated on top of one of the biggest sources of income for the Peruvian government: mineral deposits. Due to economic interests and the expansion of the mine, the city is doomed to disappear. My series El Muqui, narrates a story of daily lives and environmental concerns, combined with elements such as the local folklore and cultural traditions.

“El Muqui” is a folkloric character in the Andean mines who is highly respected, even feared, by miners, and has a strong moral code. Popular tales talk about how he is aware of the miners’ desires and actions, but also playful with children. El Muqui is the center of many of the celebrations and traditions in Cerro de Pasco.

This is an important project for me because after living in the US for half of my life, I felt that it was essential to find myself and reconnect with my Peruvian roots and heritage. El Muqui also gives me the opportunity to continue making work of social relevance, and to give people, like the inhabitants of Cerro de Pasco, a voice that they do not have. As the mining activity increases, the Peruvian government is planning to relocate the city, so this project documents a city that will cease to exist as it is today.