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Charles Davis Jameson was an American civil engineer who lived and worked on railroads in China with the Perkin Syndicate between 1895-1918. The papers include two letters Jameson wrote to his mother; four diaries, one of which was unused; a 60-page commonplace book mainly filled with handwritten copies of published poetry, and four Japanese lithotints. The rest of the papers comprise eight typescript or published engineering reports authored by Jameson and others on Chinese projects, in English and a few in Chinese, along with two versions of Jameson's typescript description of a trip to Shanxi and Hunan. There are seventeen photograph albums, dated 1898 and undated, featuring 1255 black-and-white photographs ranging in size from 2.25 to 5.75 inches. There are also 5 loose photographs, four black-and-white, and one tinted, ranging in size from 8 x 4.5 inches to 11.5 x 9.5 inches. An additional five black-and-white photographs feature a Chinese man as an archer, holding a stone, and a wielding a kwan dao. These photographs are generally 6 x 8.25 inches and are mounted on 10 x 12.25-inch card stock.

The papers include two letters Jameson wrote to his mother; four diaries, one of which was unused; a 60-page commonplace book mainly filled with handwritten copies of published poetry, and four Japanese lithotints. The rest of the papers comprise eight typescript or published engineering reports authored by Jameson and others on Chinese projects, in English and a few in Chinese, along with two versions of Jameson's typescript description of a trip to Shanxi and Hunan.

There are also seventeen photograph albums, dated 1898 and undated, featuring 1255 black-and-white photographs ranging in size from 2.25 to 5.75 inches. There are albumen and gelatin silver prints. One of the albums is a commercial Japanese album that features hand-tinted photographs. Two albums focus on Shanxi province; three others focus on Beijing. Subjects include waterways and boats, landscapes, groups of Chinese or Westerners, engineering projects, street scenes, rural life, caravans, portraits, missionaries, houses for Westerners, farming and rice crops, and temples and other buildings. Five photographs in photograph album 2 are duplicates of photographs in the William Hillman Shockley photographs collection.

There are 5 loose photographs, four black-and-white, and one tinted, ranging in size from 8 x 4.5 inches to 11.5 x 9.5 inches. Three photographs of international locations, including Fingall's Cave, Scotland; a temple in Agra, India, and a scene of Geneva, Switzerland, are all mounted. The subjects of the other two photographs are a Chinese waterway with three boats, and a courtyard with a Western man being waited on by a Chinese servant. An additional five black-and-white photographs feature a Chinese man as an archer, holding a stone, and a wielding a kwan dao. These photographs are generally 6 x 8.25 inches and are mounted on 10 x 12.25-inch card stock.

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Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by an amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. Nightingale from 1920 to 1921, while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's photographs are of value not only for the image content, which includes street scenes, vendors, modes of transportation, shrines, temples, pagodas, monasteries, towers, and landscapes, but also for his lengthy contextual commentary written on the back of each card. The majority of the images were taken in Hangzhou (referred to as Hangchow), Suzhou (Soochow), Mount Putuo island (Pu-tu), and Shanghai, China, but there are also a few images from other cities (Ningbo, Chang'an, and Harinen?), and a set of 11 images were taken in Japan. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. (F.B.) Nightingale from 1920 to 1921 while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's collection is of value not only for the image content, which includes many street scenes with individuals in addition to well-known sites and landscapes, but also for his lengthy captions on the back of each card, commenting on food customs, architecture, folklore, commerce, and religious beliefs and practices, as seen from a Westerner's perspective.

The majority of the images were taken in Suzhou (referred to in captions as Soochow, 55 images), Hangzhou (Hangchow, 44), Mount Putuo Island (Pu-tu, 14), and Shanghai, China (13), but there are also a few photographs from other cities (Chang'an, Ningbo, Harinen?), and a set of 11 images taken in Japan. There is also one photograph of overgrown land on Nightingale's Pasadena, California property called "Palawoo." Several images feature Nightingale, and one shows the porter carrying his camera equipment. The majority of the images are crisp with little fading. A few are stamped with small identification numbers.

Subjects include numerous temples, pagodas, monasteries, monuments, tombs, and other historic sites, some of which no longer exist. Nightingale was able to capture some images of temple interiors, and he often noted which religious sites allowed entry to women. There are many photos of street life, river traffic, modes of transportation, and Chinese vendors and pedestrians going about their daily business.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Set of 95 photographic color images in slide format, taken by Jeff Kosokoff, a librarian at Duke University, Durham, N.C., while traveling in Japan, mainland China, and Taiwan from January to April 1983. The images are arranged by geographic location, in alphabetical order: Akira, Japan; Hong Kong; Hohhot (or Huhhot), the capital of the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region in North China; the Inner Mongolia grasslands; and Taipei, Taiwan. Subjects includes the rural landscapes and cityscapes of each area and its citizens, including street scenes and street art, markets, advertising and other signs, vending machines, and modes of transportation. Photographs taken in Inner Mongolia include dwellings (yurts), families and individuals in native dress, domestic Bactrian camels, and some scenes from the city of Hohhot. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists of a set of 95 photographic color images in slide format, taken by Jeff Kosokoff, a librarian at Duke University, Durham, N.C., while traveling in Japan, mainland China, and Taiwan from January to April 1983. The images are arranged by geographic location, in alphabetical order: Akira, Japan; Hong Kong; Hohhot (or Huhhot), the capital of the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region in North China; the Inner Mongolia grasslands; and Taipei, Taiwan. Subjects includes rural landscapes and cityscapes of each area and its citizens, including street scenes and street art, markets, advertising and other signs, vending machines, and modes of transportation. There are images of an acrobatics performance and some night cityscapes. Images taken in Inner Mongolia include dwellings (yurts), families and individuals in native dress, domestic Bactrian camels, and some scenes from the city of Hohhot.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Bound photograph album containing 48 photographs taken by Sir Percy Moleworth Sykes during his travels in a mountainous region of Central Asia, now the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China, with his sister, Ella Sykes. The gelatin silver prints measure approximately 4 1/2 x 6 3/4 inches and are window-mounted two to a page with calligraphic captions in white ink. Subjects include landscapes, strategic buildings such as forts and trading posts, and local Uighur, Beg, Kyrgyz, and Kazak people and their dwellings and animals, as well as British, Russian, Turkish, and Chinese people and officials. Specific locations in captions include Kashgar, the Tuman River, Yarkand, Khotan, Merkit, Bulunkul, the Pamirs, Tashkurgan, Muztagh Ata, Karakul lake, Tian Shan mountains, and Osh. The images are large, crisp, and rich with detail, offering views of a remote area and its culture during tensions in the decades following the Russo-Turkish War.

Bound photograph album containing 48 photographs taken by Sir Percy Moleworth Sykes during his travels in a mountainous region of Central Asia, now the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China, with his sister, Ella Sykes. The gelatin silver prints measure approximately 4 1/2 x 6 3/4 inches and are window-mounted two to a page with calligraphic captions in white ink. Subjects include landscapes, strategic buildings such as forts and trading posts, and local Uighur, Beg, Kyrgyz, and Kazak people and their dwellings and animals, as well as British, Russian, Turkish, and Chinese people and officials. Specific locations in captions include Kashgar, the Tuman River, Yarkand, Khotan, Merkit, Bulunkul, the Pamirs, Tashkurgan, Muztagh Ata, Karakul lake, Tian Shan mountains, and Osh. The images are large, crisp, and rich with detail, offering views of a remote area and its culture during tensions in the decades following the Russo-Turkish War.

Sir Percy and Ella Sykes co-authored a book based on this journey, titled Through deserts and oases of Central Asia (1920, available online), and many images in the photograph album were used as illustrations, and are noted in this collection guide. It is clear from the narrative written by Ella Sykes (Part I in the book) that she was also taking photographs during their travels, but according to the album's title statement, the images in this album all were taken by Percy Sykes.

The folio photograph album (11 3/4 by 9 1/2 inches) is bound in half green morocco leather over green cloth boards, and comprises 25 pages with a calligraphic title page in white ink; the volume label inside front cover reads "Kodak Ltd series H album."

All titles were transcribed by library staff from the original album captions. Staff also assigned individual identification numbers to the photographs in sequence as they appear in the album.

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Sidney D. Gamble photographs, 1906-2007 15 Linear Feet — Approximately 11,250 items

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The Sidney D. Gamble collection consists primarily of contact sheets, hand-colored glass slides, 35mm duplicate slides, contact prints, negatives, and other photographic formats documenting Gamble's four visits to China from 1908 to 1932. In total, there are over 5,000 unique images in the collection depicting urban and rural life, economic conditions, public events, agriculture, religious statuary, architecture, and the countryside. In addition to photographs of China, the collection contains a handful of images captured by Gamble from Japan and Korea and images captured by David Gamble in the western United States, circa 1906. Also included are artifacts, audiovisual materials, including moving images captured by Gamble in China from 1926 to 1933, scrapbooks, a small selection of Gamble's personal papers, and records of the Sidney D. Gamble Foundation for China Studies, which relate to the exhibition of Gamble's photographs in China and the United States, 1980s-2000s. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists primarily of contact sheets and contact prints, hand-colored glass slides, 35mm duplicate slides, negatives, and other photographic formats documenting Sidney Gamble's four visits to China from 1908 to 1932. In total, there are over 5,000 unique images, which depict urban and rural life, economic conditions, public events, architecture, religious statuary, and the countryside.

Other materials in the collection include artifacts; audiovisual materials, including moving images captured by Gamble in China from 1926 to 1933; a small collection of Sidney D. Gamble's personal papers; records of the Sidney D. Gamble Foundation; and printed materials. The Personal Papers series includes biographical information, correspondence, scrapbooks, notebooks, and writings documenting Gamble's travels in China and his study of the country's social life and customs. The Gamble Foundation Records series consists of correspondence, printed materials, and reports documenting the Foundation's curation and exhibition of Gamble's photographs in the United States and China from the 1980s to the 2000s. The rinted Materials series includes Mandarin character drill cards, and Mandarin readers used in Chinese language schools, as well as a thesis describing the origins and evolution of the Princeton in Asia program. In addition to photographs of China, the collection contains a handful of images captured by Sidney Gamble from Japan and Korea, and images captured by his father David Gamble in the western United States around 1906.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Tom Rankin photographs and papers, 1977-2016 33.5 Linear Feet — 28 boxes; 2 film reels — Approximately 13,650 items — 33.5 linear feet; approximately 13,640 items

Tom Rankin is a documentary photographer, filmmaker, folklorist, professor of art and documentary studies, and former director of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection consists of 147 black-and-white and color photographs documenting the American South and China. Photographs from the South focus on religious sites, rituals, and communities in the Mississippi Delta region, as well as portraits of individuals, including portraits of Mississippi writer Larry Brown, and Southern landscapes. An additional documentary project from 2016 took Rankin to China, where he photographed semi-rural landscapes, often taken with high-rise buildings in the far distance or adjacent to industrial structures, as well as bridges and rivers, markets and live fish vendors, and a few street scenes. Finished prints range from 8x11 inch contact prints to 11x14, 16x20, and 20x24 large-format prints. Supporting materials include manuscripts, publications files, and two films, all deriving from Rankin's career and art practice. Includes a digital audio recording of a talk by Rankin at the exhibit opening of his work, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographic work of Tom Rankin in this collection consists of 147 black-and-white and color photographs documenting the American South and China. Southern photographs were taken from 1980 to 2007, and focus on religious sites, rituals, and communities in the Mississippi Delta region; these prints form the largest series, "Sacred Space." Another body of work features portraits of Mississippi writer Larry Brown. A third body of work, "Portraits from the American South," offers views of Southern people, cultures, and landscapes in both color and black-and-white.

An additional documentary project from 2016 took Rankin to China, where he photographed semi-rural landscapes, often taken with high-rise buildings in the far distance or adjacent to industrial structures, as well as bridges and rivers, markets and live fish vendors, and a few street scenes.

Print sizes range from 11x14, 13x19, 16x20, and 20x24 inches, with many housed in window mats. Along with these prints, there are also 8x11 inch black-and-white matted contact prints. All titles were created by the photographer.

Selected photographs from this collection have been exhibited at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke and other locations. A selection of Rankin's photographs was published in a book, Sacred Space: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta (1993).

Supporting materials in this collection include a digital audio recording of a talk by Rankin at the exhibit opening of work from the Sacred Space series, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta," as well as paper records related to his career and art practice, including book publications and book layouts. Also in the collection are two motion films, Dance Like a River (1985), directed by Barry Dorfeld and Tom Rankin, and Four Women Artists (1977), directed by Bill Ferris.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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William Hillman Shockley photographs, 1896-1922 and undated, bulk 1897-1909 9.0 Linear Feet — 20 boxes; approximately 3224 items

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white photographs taken by W.H. (William Hillman) Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer between the years 1896 to 1909. Locations include China (including Manchuria); Korea; India; Japan; Australia; and Russia (including Siberia); London; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco; as well as several other south Asian locations. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Formats include more than 2000 small vintage prints, over 400 modern prints, and over 400 nitrate film and glass plate negatives. Many of the photographs bear original captions. There are also some Shockley family photographs, correspondence (1905-1922), a notebook from India, and a few items of memorabilia. Arranged in series by geographical location and format. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white images taken by W.H. Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer. Locations include China (including Manchuria), Korea, India, Japan, Australia, and Russia (including Siberia), between the years of 1897 and 1909. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Other formats in the collection include negatives, modern photographic prints, correspondence, and a few artifacts and memorabilia. Shockley also documented his experiences in Russia, China, and other places in articles and presentations for the mining industry; some are available online (retrieved April 2016).

The bulk of the collection is made up of 2,227 vintage black-and-white contact prints measuring from 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches to 4x6 inches, many of which bear original captions in Shockley's hand. They are arranged in series by geographical location and date of travel. Accompanying these small prints is a small set of larger card-mounted photographs of Shockley family members, including Shockley's wife, May Bradford Shockley, and their young son William B. Shockley. There are also over 400 original nitrate film and glass plate negatives, some of which contain images not found elsewhere in the collection.

Several hundred modern 8x10 inch prints were made by a photo collector from Shockley's original negatives, chiefly of Russia and Siberia; some of these are unique images not found among the small original prints, including images of an upper-class family on an unidentified estate in England.

Non-photographic materials consist of Shockley's field notebook from India containing an index of photographs he took there; mica mineral samples from India; original envelopes and glass plate boxes; and a bound letterbook containing approximately 100 pieces of business correspondence and a few pieces of personal correspondence, dating from 1905 to 1922.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.