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"Hum Sab Ayodhya" exhibit panels on the Ayodhya region and destruction of the mosque, and related protest posters, Uttar Pradesh, India, after 1993-2000 3.5 Linear Feet — 3 oversize folders; 1 box — 84 items — Approximately 17 x 21 3/4 to 28 1/4 x 38 1/4 inches

Collection consists of 37 large paper sheets bearing reduced-size reproductions of 83 panels that formed a 1993 exhibit narrating the history, culture, and customs of the Aydhoya region in India, now part of the state of Uttar Pradesh. It was organized by the curator Ram Rahman and SAHMAT (Safdar Hashmi Memorial Trust), a New Delhi-based collective of Indian artists, writers, and activists against communalism and violent extremism. Also includes 47 posters protesting extremist violence, created by the same organization. The exhibit illustrates the origins of the Babri Masjid mosque complex and its destruction by Hindu extremists in December 1992. The black-and-white and color reproductions, most without captions, include 16th century paintings; regional maps; plans and large color photographs of the mosque complex; details of sculptures, scripts, and reliefs; reproductions of English accounts; and photographs of area inhabitants as well as individuals associated with regional politics. There are also several texts in Hindi. The sheets measure approximately 28 1/4 x 38 1/4 inches. Posters are sized approximately 17 x 21 3/4 inches. Detailed information on the original 1993 exhibit and its historical context is found in a 2012 publication on the exhibit, available in the Duke Libraries.

Collection consists of 37 oversize paper sheets bearing reduced-size reproductions of 83 wall panels relating to the exhibit "Hum Sab Ayodhya" ("We are all Ayodhya") on the history and culture of the Ayodhya region and mosque, Uttar Pradesh, India. Also includes 47 protest posters relating to right-wing extremism and violence.

The exhibit, organized by the curator Ram Rahman and Sahmat (Safdar Hashmi Memorial Trust, a Delhi-based collective of Indian artists and writers against communalism), explored the complex history, geography, and cultural life of Ayodhya, or Saket, presently located in the district of Faizabad, in the State of Uttar Pradesh, India. It focused specifically on the Babri Masjid mosque complex, built in the 16th century and an important religious site for India's Muslims, as well as a site for clashes between Hindu and Muslim communities.

The exhibit was mounted in New Delhi shortly after the destruction of the Babri Masjid by Hindu extremists in December 1992, and there was fierce controversy over its content.

The black-and-white and color exhibit sheets feature 16th century illustrations; large color and black-and-white photographs of the mosque complex; photographs of its inscriptions, reliefs, and sculptures; images of deities; maps of the region; photographs of individuals connected with regional politics and activism; and 20th century photographic portraits of local Ayodhya peoples.

Exhibit texts include reproductions of several 19th century English accounts regarding the region's politics and geography, explanatory texts in Hindi, and an introductory title panel, also in Hindi. The sheets measure approximately 28 1/4 x 38 1/4 inches. The original sequence of the individual panels is indicated by numbers marked on the backs of the sheets.

Detailed information on the exhibit and its historical context is found in a 2012 publication on the exhibit, available in the Duke Libraries.

The collection also includes a group of 47 posters created by the SAHMAT collective from the late 1990s, protesting right-wing extremist violence in India directed at secular, cultural, and religious groups. Many refer to specific acts of violence or political and cultural intimidation. Posters include text in Hindi and English, graphic design elements, photographs, eyewitness quotations, slogans, and artwork.

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Melanie Dornier photographs, 2013-2016 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 110 color inkjet prints — 11 3/4 x 8 inches

Collection consists of two documentary photography series taken in India by Melanie Dornier. "Mahila Thana: All Women Police Station" is comprised of 56 color digital photographs, taken in 2016, recording daily life inside the walls of the All Women Police Station of Gurugram, Haryana. The images convey the human impacts of woman-specific crimes and social justice, and the role of the police station and its female officers as a safe haven for distressed and abused women. The 54 color digital prints in "Punch My Face: Women's Boxing in India" document the daily life and experiences of Meena Kumari, a wife, mother, daughter, police officer, and boxer, 2013-2016. All prints measure 11 3/4 x 8 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection consists of two documentary photography series by Melanie Dornier taken in India. "Mahila Thana: All Women Police Station" is comprised of 56 color digital prints. The photographs - taken during 2016 - record daily life inside the walls of the All Women Police Station of Gurugram, Haryana. The 54 color digital prints in "Punch My Face: Women's Boxing in India, document the experiences of Meena Kumari, a wife, mother, buffalo owner, police officer, and boxer, between 2013 and 2016.

In an artist's statement Dornier describes that in 2012, "...the safety issues of the Indian women and gender violence were brought to the fore by the news of the gang rape and death of a young student in New Delhi, India. Since then funding and action plans have been implemented all around the country. In Gurugram, the millennium city in the state of Haryana, it was decided to open an All Women Police Station (AWPS) as in each of Haryana's districts and this was completed in August 2015. The project 'Mahila Thana,' which is 'All Women Police Station' in Hindi, documents the daily life inside the walls of the AWPS of Gurugram."

On "Punch My Face," Dornier reflects that, "Meena Kumari was born in December 1982 to a modest rural family. Now she is reaching the end of her boxing career and she hopes to soon become a police inspector. In 2001, Meena was one of the first Indian women to become a boxer and enjoyed visibility on the international scene. Her first major fight was confronting her father who believed boxing was not a respectable activity for a woman. Despite this Meena worked harder and harder and quickly reached the national and international stage in the flyweight category (51KG). Back then, female boxers were trained with young boys due to the shortage of women in the ring...at the end of 2016 and at the end of this photo documentary, we see Meena in the first months of her third pregnancy."

Dornier is the winner of the 2017 Bettye Lane Award for Feminist Photography, sponsored by the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

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Indian-born professional photographer active in the last half of the 19th century; died in 1905. Collection of 51 large albumen and gelatin silver photographs mounted on mat board, taken by professional photographer Raja Deen Dayal, which offer insights into the culture, history, and environment of India in the last decades of the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. The prints range in size from 5x8" to 9x11", and document the 1903 visit of Duke and Duchess of Connaught, which includes marshalling of troops and parades, various archaeological sites, monuments, and natural vistas. Images are arranged by print number, some of which are original and some assigned by the dealer (in brackets). Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 51 large albumen and gelatin silver photographs mounted on mat board, taken by professional photographer Raja Deen Dayal, which offer insights into the culture, history, and environment of India in the last decades of the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. The prints range in size from 5x8" to 9x11", and document the 1903 visit of Duke and Duchess of Connaught, which includes marshalling of troops and parades; various archaeological sites (Delhi, Pesawar, Kashmir, Sriniggur); monuments; and natural vistas. Images are arranged by print number, some of which are original and some assigned by the dealer (in brackets).

Of the 51 photographs, 17 portray the visit of the Duke and Duchess of Connaught's visit to Gwalior State in 1903. These gelatin silver photographs were previously housed in an album; now they are singly mounted on mat board and measure from 5"x8" to 12"x8". Several of the images capture the marshalling of troops and a military review, others the elaborate furnishings of the Duke and Duchess' living quarters, others still, opulently adorned elephants. Some retain the original captions.

The remaining 34 photographs document various archaeological and natural sites in India. Of special interest are the Jama Masjid, the Qutub Minar, and the tomb of Nizam-ud-Din. Deen Dayal also captured images of places such as the Pir Panjal mountain route into Kashmir and the glaciers above Gulmarg, Kashmir. The prints also portray the Lidder Valley, Kashmir, River Ghelum and various forts. There are also a few street scenes in Delhi and various architectural details of the Jain Temple in Chittore Fort and the Taj Mahal. Two of the photographs are gelatin silver prints and the remainder are albumen. The prints all measure 9"x11".

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Samuel Bourne photographs, circa 1861-circa 1889 21 Linear Feet — 26 boxes — 646 items

Collection consists of 19th century albumen photographs taken by commercial photographer Samuel Bourne and other partners as they traveled to sites in modern-day India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Burma. Of the 646 prints in the collection, 200 are mounted in three large bound commercial photograph albums, while the remaining 446 are single, loose prints; all were published by the firm Bourne & Shepherd. The majority of the prints range in size from roughly 6x9 to 10x12 inches. Subjects include the vast landscapes of nothern India; landmarks such as temples, rivers and canals, monuments, mountain hostels, and European-built cathedrals and civic structures; rural scenes from villages and tea plantations; and scenes from the cities of Delhi, Bombay (Mumbai), and Calcutta (Kolkata). There are also several dozen ethnic portraits of native inhabitants and group portraits of English officials and Indian counterparts. A number of images have been attributed to Bourne's partners Charles Shepherd and Colin Murray.

Collection consists of mid- to late 19th century albumen photographs taken by commercial photographer Samuel Bourne and other partners in the Bourne & Shepherd as they traveled to sites in modern-day India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Burma. Some of the early images in the collection, circa 1861, may be the work of a predecessor studio, Shepherd & Robertson. Most Bourne & Shepherd studio negative numbers after 2200 are considered the work of studio photographers following Bourne's departure in 1871; in particular, Colin Murray is considered Bourne's successor.

Of the 646 prints in the collection, 200 are mounted in three large, fine photograph albums published by the studio Bourne & Shepherd, while the remaining 446 loose prints are either loose or mounted on thin board.

Subjects in the collection include the vast landscapes of northern India; landmarks such as Hindu temples, bridges, rivers and canals, monuments, forts, mountain hostels, and European-built cathedrals and civic structures; rural scenes of villages and newly-established tea plantations; newly constructed railroads; and scenes from the cities of Delhi, Bombay (Mumbai), and Calcutta (Kolkata). Nearly every scene features a few human figures carefully posed for scale or atmosphere. Also present are a series of group portraits of English officials with their Indian counterparts, and group portraits of Indian royalty. There are also several dozen portraits of native inhabitants produced as part of the ethnic studies common to the late 19th century; most have been attributed to Bourne's partner Charles Shepherd. Many of these group studies were published in the eight-volume "People of India" (1868-1875), and indeed most of the portraits in this collection are on pages taken from these volumes.

The majority of the prints range in size from roughly 6x9 to 11x14 inches, with most around 10x12 inches, but a handful are smaller cartes-de-visite sizes. The images were secured in the field, often under extreme conditions, using the wet-collodion process to produce glass plate negatives, typically 10x12 inches. Some of the prints were cropped as ovals or in other shapes, but most are rectangular in form. Judging from their backings, many were previously mounted in albums or books.

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William Gedney photographs and papers, 1887, circa 1920, 1940-1998 and undated, bulk 1955-1989 115.0 Linear Feet — 336 boxes, 1 oversize folder — Approximately 66,800 items

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Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam. The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The breadth of these materials offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision. Additional perspectives on his life and work can be found in his many notebooks and journals; artwork; handmade books; correspondence files; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; audiocassettes; and teaching materials. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The availability of every format in the photographic process offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision.

Additional perspectives come from his many notebooks and journals; artwork, including many sketches and drawings; handmade books and book project materials; correspondence files; memo books; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; and teaching materials, all described in fuller detail in this collection guide. Gedney's writings, in particular, provide extraordinary views into his life and work. Notebooks, memo books, travel diaries, and loose writings contain a compelling mix of personal entries, essays, poetry, quotations, expenses, travel notes, observations on slang, music and book lists, and clippings. Viewed as a whole, Gedney's professional and personal papers record his thoughts on photography, human behavior across continents, society and art, and on his own development as a photographer.

The large exhibit-quality prints, and the large groups of work prints from which they were selected, are arranged in series by bodies of work, in alphabetical order: Composers; England/Ireland; The Farm; India, subdivided into Benares and Calcutta; Night; Nudes; Paris; and United States, further divided into the subseries Kentucky, New York, San Francisco, and U.S Trips. The latter comprises his travels to other states such as Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Montana, and Tennessee. The contact sheets and negatives are described and listed under their own series.

To support himself, Gedney undertook commercial work. There is very early work for a bread company and other firms, and he then worked for Time-Life (and photographed office parties there) and other magazines. There are two larger, significant bodies of other commercial work: the earliest consists of portraits of deaf children and their teachers commissioned around 1958 by the St. Joseph's School for the Deaf. The second project, commissioned by the Social Security Administration in 1969, contains only photographic prints - portraits of rural inhabitants of Hays, Kansas (farmers, pensioners, and widows), and Federal employees. A published catalog is found in this series, listing other photographers involved in the projects. The Social Security Administration's archives hold Gedney's original negatives of this work. During the same period, Gedney visited a state mental hospital in Norton, Kansas and photographed a series of arresting portraits of the young people housed there. These bodies of work have not been published online for copyright and privacy reasons; however, the physical prints are open to onsite use.

For further descriptions of each of Gedney's major bodies of work, please follow the series links in the collection guide, keeping in mind that contact sheets, which offer the most complete set of images in thumbnail size, are represented by their own separate collection guide series.

Many of William Gedney's earliest images incorporate personally-significant locations and people. His first serious photographic study, undertaken in the 1950s, centered on his grandparents and their dairy farm in Norton Hill, New York. During this period, Gedney also photographed neighborhoods in his birthplace, Albany, and his hometown of Greenville. Later photographs of friends and family in New York (Arnold and Anita Lobel), San Francisco (Eric Hoffer and Lili Osborne), and Paris (photographer Raghubir Singh and wife Anne Henning) are found throughout the collection, as well as a few shots of his mentors Lee Friedlander and Diane Arbus. Self-portraits of Gedney show up frequently in the contact sheet images but there are no known larger images of the photographer.

Gedney was particularly drawn to human gatherings. He photographed people not only on Brooklyn's streets, but also at parties, car and flower shows, motorcycle rallies, body building exhibitions (where he also photographed Diane Arbus), and in bars and at Coney Island boardwalk and beaches. Early series include African American parades and gospel revivals. He continued to focus on crowds everywhere he traveled, particularly in large cities such as San Francisco (where he photographed Golden Gate gatherings in 1966-1967), Los Angeles, Chicago, London, and Paris, often turning his camera to young people and their street culture. In the 1960s he also documented organized labor rallies and migrant programs in Southern California (Cesar Chavez appears in several images), and in the 1970s, important marches and rallies for gay rights in California and New York.

The photographic series also house a handful of large copy prints and contact sheets of Gedney images printed by photographers Margaret Sartor, Julie Stovall and others affiliated with the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies. Finally, there is also a cluster of late 1980s contact sheets and prints processed by Gedney's former student and close friend Peter Bellamy from rolls of film found among Gedney's belongings at his death.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Preferred source for image titles: titles as written by Gedney on the backs of photographic prints. Second preferred source: titles on index cards prepared by Gedney for individual best-quality prints. Third source: captions written by Gedney on contact sheets, describing photo sequences. When no title was found, library staff have used "No title known."

Folder- and group-level titles for work prints, negatives, and papers were devised by library staff in the 1990s and 2010s, and are noted as such when known. Many if not most of these were derived from Gedney's original folder labels and notes; in the absence of an original description, titles have been devised by library staff.

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William Hillman Shockley photographs, 1896-1922 and undated, bulk 1897-1909 9.0 Linear Feet — 20 boxes; approximately 3224 items

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white photographs taken by W.H. (William Hillman) Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer between the years 1896 to 1909. Locations include China (including Manchuria); Korea; India; Japan; Australia; and Russia (including Siberia); London; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco; as well as several other south Asian locations. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Formats include more than 2000 small vintage prints, over 400 modern prints, and over 400 nitrate film and glass plate negatives. Many of the photographs bear original captions. There are also some Shockley family photographs, correspondence (1905-1922), a notebook from India, and a few items of memorabilia. Arranged in series by geographical location and format. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white images taken by W.H. Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer. Locations include China (including Manchuria), Korea, India, Japan, Australia, and Russia (including Siberia), between the years of 1897 and 1909. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Other formats in the collection include negatives, modern photographic prints, correspondence, and a few artifacts and memorabilia. Shockley also documented his experiences in Russia, China, and other places in articles and presentations for the mining industry; some are available online (retrieved April 2016).

The bulk of the collection is made up of 2,227 vintage black-and-white contact prints measuring from 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches to 4x6 inches, many of which bear original captions in Shockley's hand. They are arranged in series by geographical location and date of travel. Accompanying these small prints is a small set of larger card-mounted photographs of Shockley family members, including Shockley's wife, May Bradford Shockley, and their young son William B. Shockley. There are also over 400 original nitrate film and glass plate negatives, some of which contain images not found elsewhere in the collection.

Several hundred modern 8x10 inch prints were made by a photo collector from Shockley's original negatives, chiefly of Russia and Siberia; some of these are unique images not found among the small original prints, including images of an upper-class family on an unidentified estate in England.

Non-photographic materials consist of Shockley's field notebook from India containing an index of photographs he took there; mica mineral samples from India; original envelopes and glass plate boxes; and a bound letterbook containing approximately 100 pieces of business correspondence and a few pieces of personal correspondence, dating from 1905 to 1922.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.