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Gerard Gaskin photographs, 1995-2012 2.5 Linear Feet — 33 Inkjet Prints: 19 black and white, and 14 color.

This collection includes 33 photographic prints comprising the series, Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene by Gerard H. Gaskin, 2012 CDS/ Honickman First Book Prize in Photography Award Winner. Prints were exhibited at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University from November 4 2013-February 22 2014.

This collection includes 33 photographic prints comprising the series, Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene by Gerard H. Gaskin, 2012 CDS/ Honickman First Book Prize in Photography Award Winner. Prints were exhibited at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University from November 4 2013-February 22 2014.

About the CDS/ Honickman First Book Prize in Photography: North American photographers who are pursuing work of creative or social importance have too few opportunities for support and recognition; this is especially true when photographers are engaged in personal or in-depth ongoing projects. And while there are other sources for grants and fellowships in photography, the chance to see a body of work in print, as a coherent book-length work, is rare. Concerned about these problems and recognizing their shared organizational interests, the Honickman Foundation and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University came together to create this important biennial book-publication prize, first awarded in 2002.

The prize is open to North American photographers who use their cameras for creative exploration, whether it be of places, people, or communities; of the natural or social world; of beauty at large or the lack of it; of objective or subjective realities. The prize honors work that is visually compelling, that bears witness, and that has integrity of purpose.

Judges for the First Book Prize in Photography are among the most significant and innovative artists, curators, and writers in contemporary photography: Robert Adams, Maria Morris Hambourg, Robert Frank, Mary Ellen Mark, William Eggleston, and Deborah Willis.

Winners of the CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography receive a grant of $3,000, publication of a book of photography, published by Duke University Press and the Center for Documentary Studies, and inclusion in a website devoted to presenting the work of the prizewinners. Winners also receive a solo exhibit—beginning with the 2014 prize, at Duke University’s new Rubenstein Library Photography Gallery—after which the photographs are placed in the library’s Archive of Documentary Arts.

Deborah Willis selected Gerard H. Gaskin to win the sixth biennial competition in 2012 for his body of photographs that have been published as Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene by Duke University Press and CDS Books of the Center for Documentary Studies.

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Jonathan Hyman photographs, 2002-2011 6 Linear Feet — 33 Items

Documentary photographer based in New York State. The color images in the Jonathan Hyman Photographs collection were taken by Hyman from 2002 to 2011, and portray vernacular memorials and other forms of public remembering that express anger, sadness and patriotic emotions following the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Centers and the Pentagon. Images take the form of graphic art, signs, sculpture, body art, and graffiti. Iconic elements include the U.S. flag, eagles, and the Twin Towers. Canvases for these forms of expression include clothing, buildings, vehicles, and tombstones. Most of the 33 large 20x24" inkjet prints were featured in Duke University exhibit Flesh & Metal, Bodies & Buildings: Works from Jonathan Hyman's Archive of 9/11 Vernacular Memorials, curated by Pedro Lasch. The exhibit was on display in the Rubenstein Photography Gallery from 9 May-16 October 2011. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The color images in the Jonathan Hyman Photographs collection were taken by Hyman from 2002 to 2011, and portray vernacular memorials and other forms of public remembering that express anger, sadness and patriotic emotions following the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Centers and the Pentagon. Images take the form of graphic art, signs, sculpture, body art, and graffiti. Iconic elements include the U.S. flag, eagles, and the Twin Towers. Canvases for these forms of expression include clothing, buildings, vehicles, and tombstones. Most of the 33 large 20x24" inkjet prints were featured in Duke University exhibit "Flesh & Metal, Bodies & Buildings: Works from Jonathan Hyman's Archive of 9/11 Vernacular Memorials," curated by Pedro Lasch. The exhibit was on display in the Rubenstein Photography Gallery from 9 May-16 October 2011. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Mel Rosenthal photographs, 1975-2011 3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes — Approximately 92 items

Collection consists of 80 black-and-white photographs taken by native New Yorker Mel Rosenthal, stemming from two documentary projects. The first documents the destruction by arson of an entire South Bronx neighborhood in New York City in the 1970s, with images of burned-out buildings and inhabitants who were forced to abandon their homes. The second project depicts Arab Americans, including men, women and children of Syrian, Egyptian, Moroccan, Algerian, Jordanian and Palestinian descent, living in New York State during the last decade of the 20th century and the early 2000s. Scenes include images of children, professionals, neighborhood life, and the religious lives of Christians, Muslims, Greek Orthodox, Maronites, Jews and Coptics. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 and 16x20 inches. Also included are some publicity items for exhibits and a workshop on documentary photography, and an audiocassette recording of Rosenthal speaking at an exhibit opening in 2004. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 80 black-and-white photographs taken by New York City native Mel Rosenthal, stemming from two documentary projects. The first documents the destruction by arson of an entire South Bronx neighborhood in New York City in the 1970s, with images of burned-out buildings and inhabitants who were forced to abandon their homes. The neighborhood is the same one where Rosenthal grew up, and the series features a portrait of Mel Rosenthal in his old bedroom.

The second project examines the daily lives of Arab Americans, including men, women and children of Syrian, Egyptian, Moroccan, Algerian, Jordanian and Palestinian descent, in New York State in the early 2000s. Scenes include images of children, professionals, neighborhood life, and the religious lives of Christians, Muslims, Greek Orthodox, Maronites, Jews and Coptics. It was exhibited shortly after the 2001 terrorist attacks.

Selected images in the Rosenthal collection were exhibited at Duke University and these available online. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 and 16x20 inches. Exhibit prints in their mats measure 16x20 and 20x24 inches.

Also included are some publicity items for exhibits and workshops on documentary photography, a music CD with photography by Rosenthal, and an audiocassette recording of Rosenthal speaking at an exhibit opening in 2004.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.