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Ben Alper photographs, 2013-2014 4.0 Linear Feet — 4 flat boxes (309 color photographs)

Ben Alper is an artist based in North Carolina. His series, An Index of Walking, won the 2015 Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Documentarians Working in North Carolina. An Index of Walking is a yearlong photographic project that explores the enigmatic intersection of memory, place, geography, and perception. Taken along the same daily walk in his neighborhood, the photographs depict the commonplace objects and spaces that comprise what could be any typical suburban area. Alper writes that "My walks have been a vehicle for exploration, contemplation, and looking; they have provided a structure in which to engage with the place in which I currently live." Collection acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts (Duke University).

The Ben Alper Photographs contain his series, An Index of Walking, which won the 2015 Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Documentations Working in North Carolina. This series consists of 309 9x6” color photographs printed on 8 ½ x 11” sheets of Hahnemühle Final Art Pearl paper. Alper included the following abstract about this project:

"An Index of Walking is a yearlong photographic project that explores the enigmatic intersection of memory, place, geography, and perception. Taken along the same daily walk in my neighborhood, the photographs depict the commonplace objects and spaces that comprise what could be any typical suburban area. My walks have been a vehicle for exploration, contemplation, and looking; they have provided a structure in which to engage with the place in which I currently live. Georges Perec coined the term infra-ordinary to characterize the mundane features of everyday life – glass, concrete, utensils, our daily rhythms, the way we spend our time. He advocated for an anthropology of the banal, a method of sorts in which the habitual is scrutinized with intensity. Perec wrote, “We sleep through our lives in a dreamless sleep. But where is our life? Where is our body? Where is our space?”

Time spent with the everyday spaces, objects, and rhythms of daily life reveals a wealth of information, most of which hides in plain sight. What is gleaned is often fragmentary and discrete; however, even the most ostensibly ordinary landscape is imprinted with so much – time, history, growth, decay, politics, and wonder. Caught somewhere between art and life, private and social experience, and repetition and chance, this project exists in the lineage of Happenings. Everyday I take the same walk and restrict myself to photographing one object or space which captivates me. These constraints delineate my route and process, but within these strictures lie opportunities for spontaneity, drifting, and subversion. As Rebecca Solnit avows in her book Wanderlust: A History of Walking, “exploring the world is one of the best ways of exploring the mind, and walking travels both terrains.” It is this hybridized and indeterminate space, at once physical and mental, that interests me. This fascination derives from my own tenuous relationship to memory and place. Many of the homes, neighborhoods, and towns that I’ve lived in are unsettlingly absent from my consciousness. More often than not what remains is an abstracted still image, devoid of meaningful context. Sometimes, I realize that memories of disparate places have fused into one another, blurring the distinction between separate locations. A composite memory of place is born – temporally and spatially incongruous, but nevertheless united.

These compound memories, when not unified by place, find continuity in shared emotional states or physical attributes. Analogous experiences, whether joyful, upsetting, comforting, or tedious, bond to one another somewhat inexplicably. Psychological correspondences always seem to prevail over geographical ones. With An Index of Walking, I hope to speak about place as a series of discrete and fragmentary components, akin to a puzzle that is missing pieces. This is also how I archive and recall places in my mind – not as unified wholes, but as fractional and lacking continuity. It has become clear to me that this project is more than merely a durational exercise indexing a series of walks in my neighborhood; it is also a visual metaphor for my own idiosyncratic relationship to memory and place. In her wonderful essay “On Keeping A Notebook,” Joan Didion writes, “the point of my keeping a notebook has never been, nor is it now, to have an accurate factual record of what I have been doing or thinking. That would be a different impulse entirely, an instinct for reality which I sometimes envy but do not possess.” This sentiment resonates deeply with me as I think about my current relationship with photography. When I began An Index of Walking, I envisioned the project as one rooted in recording, mapping, and descriptive representation. In reality, what I’ve created is an illusory portrait of a place over time, as much fiction as it is fact. It extends beyond the evidentiary impulse simply to catalog my surroundings. Ultimately, the work represents my desire to fabricate a space that is singularly my own and to liberate the photograph from the confines of factual depiction. If memory perpetually betrays those who call upon it, then initiating this project from a place of invention and abstraction may be a way of subverting the anxiety of forgetting."

The Ben Alper Photographs were acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts (Duke University).

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The Neighborhoods Project was created as part of the Community Programs department within Duke's Center for Documentary Studies. According to the CDS website, it offered North Carolina elementary school teachers an innovative and effective way to meet social studies goals outlined in the state's standard course of study. The project provided a way to engage students in their own communities, focusing on their individual lives and stories through photographs, narrative writing, and storytelling. It provided a series of experiential learning activities that encouraged the use of photography, oral history, and narrative writing in an exploration of community and citizenship. Collection includes black-and-white photographs, negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes where whites, African Americans, and Spanish-seeking citizens live. Some materials are in Spanish. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

Collection includes black-and-white photographs (a few are hand-colored), negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Materials are sorted by school, with miscellaneous or unidentified materials in the last series. Also contains electronic and audiovisual recordings that require reformatting before use.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The collection houses work created by students enrolled in documentary studies courses at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. The student projects focus primarily on exploring and documenting the social lives and experiences of people living in and around rural and urban areas of Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina, through photography or oral history. Subjects include but are not limited to local school environments; churches and religious life; ethnic communities and neighborhoods; war veterans; the 9/11 attacks; the labor and civil rights movements as experienced by local individuals; students at Duke University; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; beauty pageants; local music scenes; and the built environment and culture of North Carolina towns, and cities. Audiovisual materials include sound recordings and moving images, and may require reformatting before contents can be accessed. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection houses photographs, interviews, essays, and other documentary works created by students enrolled in courses or thesis projects on documentary studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), from 1980 to 2011. Most of the student projects focus on the social life and customs of persons living in and around Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina. Themes include life in cities and towns, particularly in Durham; rural life; schools and other institutions such as churches and retirement homes, and charitable organizations such as soup kitchens and orphanages; community centers such as stores, daycares, and laundromats; African American communities and neighborhoods, particularly in Durham; beauty pageants; local music; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; midwives; the 9/11 attacks in New York City; and Duke University students and campus life. One series of images portrays the Chuck Davis African American Dance Ensemble in Durham. Oral histories of N.C. civil rights and labor activists, American war veterans, and other individuals are associated with certain courses.

The majority of projects focus on Durham area locales, but other cities and towns in N.C. documented include Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Seagrove, Wanchese, Cane Creek, Oxford, Carrboro, Orange Factory, Rougemont, Saxapahaw, Salisbury, Northside, Corinth, and Cedar Grove. There are a few projects based in Virginia, and summer projects located in Massachusetts, Tennessee, Tel-Aviv, and France.

The collection also includes a few grant-supported projects by professional documentarians Eric Green, Kate Rhodenbaugh, Carolina Wang, and Donna Lennard, and photographic work by Bill Bamberger, a faculty member at Duke.

Black-and-white prints make up the majority of formats, but there are also many slides. The more recent additions increasingly include oral histories on audio cassettes and CD-ROMS and other project-related digital media. These are marked in the folder descriptions. Original audiovisual and electronic media are closed to use and may require the production of use copies before they can be accessed.

The courses were all sponsored by the Center for Documentary Photography, which in 1989 changed its name to the Center for Documentary Studies. Among the faculty teaching courses for the Center for Documentary Studies are noted documentarians Bill Bamberger, John Biewen, David Cecelski, Alex Harris, and Margaret Sartor, some of whom have contributed their own documentary work to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Chris Johnson farmworker photographs, 1990s 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes

Collection comprises 124 black-and-white digital photographic prints taken by North Carolina photographer Chris Johnson, portraying North Carolina farmworkers and migrant laborers in work settings as well as in their field camps and homes, many of which are revealed as dilapidated and unsanitary. Several series document labor organization and protests, including a five-year strike protesting working conditions for Mount Olive Pickle company workers. Other subjects in the images include the children and families of the farmworkers; volunteer teachers and organizers, some of whom are from the organization Student Action with Farmworkers; tobacco and Christmas tree growing in North Carolina; and street scenes from the border crossing areas of Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 124 black-and-white photographic prints taken by North Carolina photographer Chris Johnson, portraying North Carolina farmworkers and migrant laborers in work settings as well as in their field camps and homes, many of which are revealed as dilapidated and unsanitary. Several series document labor organization and protests, including a five-year strike protesting working conditions for Mount Olive Pickle company workers. Other subjects in the images include the children and families of the farmworkers; volunteer teachers and organizers, some of whom are from the organization Student Action with Farmworkers; tobacco and Christmas tree growing in North Carolina; and street scenes from the border crossing areas of Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico.

The prints measure 13x19 inches and are unmatted.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Born in Caroleen, North Carolina in 1902, studio photographer Herbert Lee Waters supplemented his income from 1936 to 1942 by traveling across North Carolina and parts of Virginia, Tennessee, and South Carolina to film the people of small communities. He collaborated with local movie theaters to screen his films, which he called Movies of Local People. As a filmmaker, Waters produced 252 films across 118 communities. The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and primarily comprises 16 mm black and white reversal original motion picture films created by Waters during the filming of the Movies of Local People series. The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, also includes various preservation elements created from the original footage: 16 mm internegatives; 16 mm screening prints; 3/4 inch Umatic, Betacam SP, and Digital Betacam preservation tape masters; and VHS and DVD use copies of Waters' works. The collection contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters' film making, including: a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters to record financial and business information during the filming of Movies of Local People; photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; copy of a 2005 master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters.

The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and comprises primarily 16 mm black and white reversal original motion picture films created by Waters between 1936 and 1942 as he traveled across North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia filming the residents of small towns. Waters aimed to film as many residents in each community as possible, often setting up his camera at the main intersection in town to capture community members walking downtown. Waters also typically filmed school children entering or leaving school and workers arriving to or departing from mills, plants, and factories. Waters often included trick shots to engage his audience, such as trains moving backwards or children jumping in reverse. Although the films are dominated by shots of crowds and individual faces, Waters also captured a wide variety of activities, like school recitals, sports, mechanics at work, and manufacturing processes in factories.

The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, includes various preservation elements created from the original footage: 16 mm internegatives; 16 mm screening prints; 3/4 inch Umatic, Betacam SP, and Digital Betacam preservation tape masters; and VHS and DVD use copies of Waters' works. The majority of films represented in the collection are silent, black and white, and were filmed in North Carolina. The collection includes a small number of color films and one film with sound. Reels containing mixed black and white and color footage were separated into two reels based on picture characteristic during the preservation process.

The collection also contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters, including: photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; VHS copies of a news report and a film on Waters; a copy of the master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student Martin Johnson in 2005; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters. In addition, the collection contains a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters between the years of 1936 and 1942 to document his earnings from the Movies of Local People films. The logs provide information about film screenings in the towns that he visited, including the dates of the screenings, the theaters where the films played, admission prices, the number of tickets sold, and advertising revenues. See the digital collection to view the logbooks.

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John Moses photographs, 1974-1993 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 33 items — 31 prints and 2 typed manuscripts

Collection of 23 photographs taken by John Moses, pediatrician and photographer, of teenaged parents and their children, chiefly in Durham, North Carolina and surrounding communities, and eight photographs of farmworkers taken in the South. Seeking to find the "human stories behind the statistics," he photographed the adolescent parents - almost all young women - in their homes and urban surroundings. A few images include grandparents. The photographs of farm laborers were taken in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida from 1974-1979, and include portraits of children, adults, and older people of all races at work and at home; also includes one of farmworkers protesting on a road as a bus with a Minute Maid sign rolls by. The gelatin silver prints all measure 11x14 inches. Includes an index of image titles and a three-page statement by Moses about his photography and its relevance to his medical work. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 23 photographs taken by John Moses, North Carolina pediatrician and photographer, of teenaged parents and their children, chiefly in Durham, North Carolina and surrounding communities, and eight photographs of farmworkers taken in the South.

Seeking to find the "human stories behind the statistics," Moses photographed the adolescent parents - almost all young women - in their homes and urban surroundings. A few images include grandparents. The photographs of farm laborers were taken in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida from 1974-1979, and include portraits of children, adults, and older people of all races at work and at home; also includes one of farmworkers protesting on a road as a bus with a Minute Maid sign rolls by.

The gelatin silver prints all measure 11x14 inches. Includes an index of image titles and a three-page statement by Moses about his photography and its relevance to his medical work. The description mentions oral histories conducted by Moses; these audio materials are not currently part of the collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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John Tully photographs, 2014-2018 2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 30 prints — 11x17, 17x22 inches

Collection consists of thirty color inkjet prints from a body of work titled "Shifting Sands" by photographer John Tully. The images were taken at the North Carolina coast, and include natural areas such as beaches along the Outer Banks and coastal forests in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, and human environments such as coastal highways, piers, abandoned beachfront properties. There are also some portraits of people. The photographs are accompanied by captions written by the photographer and by the artist's statement. Together, photographs and text call out the environmental, economic, and social consequences brought on by natural changes as well as by human-created climate change. The prints measure 17x22 (20) and 11x17 (10) inches. This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Documentarians of Environmental Change. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of thirty color inkjet prints from the body of work "Shifting Sands" by photographer John Tully. The images were taken on the North Carolina coast, and include natural areas such as beaches along the Outer Banks and coastal forests in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, and human-built environments such as sand-covered highways, piers and jetties, and abandoned beachfront properties. There are also some portraits of people.

Twenty prints measure 17x22 inches and ten are sized 11x17 inches. The photographs are accompanied by captions written by the photographer and by the artist's statement on the project. This work received the 2018 Archive of Documentary Arts Collection Award for Documentarians of Environmental Change.

From the artist's statement: "The work in this project documents effects of rising sea levels on North Carolina's Outer Banks. Already unstable sand bars that naturally shift and migrate, climate change is exacerbating existing issues and revealing new ones, forcing residents to grapple with the impacts of a changing landscape."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Nate Larson photographs, 2015 1 Linear Foot — 2 boxes; 63 items; 13 x 19 inches

Collection comprises a set of 48 color photographs, 13 reproductions of historic postcards, and several introductory panels, from a project by photographer and artist Nate Larson entitled "Map of All the Railroads," inspired by H.V. Poor's "Map of All the Railroads in the United States in Operation and Progress" (1854). The 13x19 inch digital color photographs, taken in 2015, explore social and economic aspects of thirteen railroad-centered cities and towns identified in Poor's publication, and their progress and potential future. Images feature cityscapes, railroad tracks, buildings and businesses, abandoned sites, monuments, several portraits of people, and other subjects. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises set of 48 color photographs, 13 reproductions of historic postcards, and several introductory panels, part of a project by photographer and artist Nate Larson entitled "Map of All the Railroads," inspired by H.V. Poor's "Map of all the Railroads in the United States in Operation and Progress" (1854). The 13x19 inch digital color photographs, taken in 2015, explore social and economic aspects of thirteen railroad-centered North Carolina cities and towns identified in Poor's book, and their progress and potential future.

The cities are: Charlotte, Concord, Gaston, Goldsboro, Greensboro, Halifax, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Salisbury, Warrenton, Wayne, Whiteville, and Wilmington. Images include views of businesses, cemeteries, railroad tracks and crossings, monuments, construction sites, abandoned buildings, and several portraits of people.

The artist's statement reads: "In November 2105, I visited twelve of these cities and the site of one former city to survey their progress and contemplate their future. These photographs are observations of the man-altered American landscape and seek to understand of the human experience within it. The images function as a meditation on the passage of time, shifting dynamics of progress and development, and the peculiarities of historic events that shape the present."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Sarah Hoskins photographs, 2000-2014 3.0 Linear Feet — 5 flat boxes — 10.3 Gigabytes — 10.3 GB transferred from external hard drive.

Collection contain images related to two photography projects by Sarah Hoskins. The Homeplace series contains 250 11x14 inch silver gelatin prints documenting Hoskins' visits and relationships with rural African American communities in Kentucky, originally established by freedmen in the 19th century. Her photographs include community events and activities such as hog butchering, church services, family reunions, and gatherings of charity groups. The Rosenwald Schools series contains approximately 300 color digital images of schools for African Americans built during the first half of the 20th century through the Rosenwald foundation, as well as some portraits of former students in Kentucky, North Carolina and Alabama. The series also includes images of a Rosenwald foundation-funded apartment building in Chicago, Illinois. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection contain images related to two photography projects by Sarah Hoskins: The Rosenwald Schools and The Homeplace.

The Homeplace series contains 250 11x14 inch silver gelatin black-and-white prints documenting Hoskins' visits and relationships with rural African American communities in Kentucky, originally established by freedmen in the 19th century. Her photographs include community events and activities such as hog butchering, church services, family reunions, and gatherings of charity groups.

The Rosenwald Schools series contains approximately 300 color digital images of schools for African Americans built during the first half of the 20th century through the Rosenwald foundation, as well as portraits of some former students in Kentucky, North Carolina and Alabama. The series also includes images of a Rosenwald foundation-funded apartment building in Chicago, Illinois.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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The records of the Durham, N.C. organization Student Action with Farmworkers comprise: administrative and event files; correspondence; reports, articles, and other publications; student project files; outreach and teaching materials; photographs, artwork, and scrapbooks; audio and video recordings; and materials related to labor organizing and protests across the U.S. Hundreds of student-led projects document through interviews, essays, photographs, videos, and other materials the lives of migrant farmworkers and their working conditions, mostly in NC but also in SC. Major themes in the collection include: history, working conditions, and abuses of migrant farmworkers in the U.S.; education and outreach efforts; housing, health, and pesticide safety; leadership development for migrant youth; grassroots theater; labor organizing and boycotts; and service learning. Materials are in English and Spanish. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Founded in 1992 in Durham, North Carolina, Student Action with Farmworkers (SAF) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to bring students and farmworkers together to learn about each other's lives, share resources and skills, improve conditions for farmworkers, and build diverse coalitions working for social change. The SAF records comprise: correspondence; meeting agendas; student projects; reports, articles, and other publications; event files; teaching materials; photos; scrapbooks; ephemera; and other documentation of SAF's programs. Materials relate more widely to immigrant and migrant worker issues, service learning, labor organizing, and protests and boycotts across the U.S.

The largest series (63 boxes) contains hundreds of individual SAF student projects directed by college-age students and interns as well as farmworker and migrant youths. Materials also include administrative files, many of which house intern applications. Project files typically contain recorded interviews, often with transcripts; essays; notebooks; artwork; poetry; audio and video recordings; theater materials; and photographs in analaog and digital formats. Some photograph albums and collages are also found here. Most of the projects took place in North Carolina but also in South Carolina. Umbrella programs include Into the Fields (ITF) and Levante. Major themes involve worker education, housing, health, and pesticide safety; leadership development; and grassroots theater as a tool for teaching and activism. Materials are in English and Spanish. Many other materials on SAF projects are found in the Administrative Series.

The large Administrative Files Series contains organizational records created or compiled by SAF staff and are organized in subseries for SAF projects, fundraising, general administrative files, organizations, and resource files (articles, fliers, and other publications).

The Printed Material Series contains Student Action with Farmworkers publications, SAF press coverage, student papers and theses, some children's books, and farmworker-related reports, articles, newsletters, data sheets, resource directories, and alerts from around the world.

The Joan Preiss Papers Series contains records related to an activist and long-time collaborator of SAF. Comprises a variety of printed materials, primarily articles and newsletters, as well as correspondence, protest ephemera, promotional material for unions and activist organizations, meeting notes, student papers, and photographs. The materials relate to migrants and farmworkers both in North Carolina and throughout the United States.

Finally, the Ephemera and Artifacts Series contains items such as posters, t-shirts, stickers, and buttons related to Burger King, Subway, Gallo, and Mt. Olive boycotts and protests. Some materials relate to protests and boycotts in other regions such as Florida and Western states. Also contains SAF publicity ephemera, and props and other materials from the Levante activist theater group.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.