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Activating the Archive student projects collection, 2015 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box; 7 computer files; 10.6 Gigabyte

Creative projects produced by students in Activating the Archive: Archival Research as Documentary Practice, DOCST 316-01 / 716-01 / ARTVIS 316-01 / VMS 314S-01, taught by Lisa McCarty in the Rubenstein Library in the Fall of 2015. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Art (Duke University).

Creative projects produced by students in Activating the Archive: Archival Research as Documentary Practice, DOCST 316-01 / 716-01 / ARTVIS 316-01 / VMS 314S-01, taught by Lisa McCarty in the Rubenstein Library in the Fall of 2015. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Art (Duke University).

Materials have been arranged by student name.

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The Durham Traditional Arts Survey was conducted in the early 2000s as part of the Document Durham project within the Community Programs department at the Center for Documentary Studies. Participants consisted of folklorists and photographers who traveled through Durham County, attempting to document the diversity of various communities by focusing on traditional artists within those communities. One outcome of the DTAS was the Home Made Visible: Durham 2002 exhibition, which highlighted Durham traditional arts and crafts. Includes fieldwork reports, interview tapes, slides, photographs, and other documentary material from the research and observations conducted by participants in the Durham Traditional Arts Survey Project. Durham communities and artists represented in the project include African American, African immigrants, Latino, Middle Eastern, Jewish, South Indian, and Asian, as well as occupational traditions and rural community traditions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Includes fieldwork reports, interview tapes, slides, photographs, and other documentary material from the research and observations conducted by participants in the Durham Traditional Arts Survey Project. Durham communities and artists represented in the project include African American, African immigrants, Latino, Middle Eastern, Jewish, South Indian, and Asian, as well as occupational traditions and rural community traditions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Born in Caroleen, North Carolina in 1902, studio photographer Herbert Lee Waters supplemented his income from 1936 to 1942 by traveling across North Carolina and parts of Virginia, Tennessee, and South Carolina to film the people of small communities. He collaborated with local movie theaters to screen his films, which he called Movies of Local People. As a filmmaker, Waters produced 252 films across 118 communities. The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and primarily comprises 16 mm black and white reversal original motion picture films created by Waters during the filming of the Movies of Local People series. The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, also includes various preservation elements created from the original footage: 16 mm internegatives; 16 mm screening prints; 3/4 inch Umatic, Betacam SP, and Digital Betacam preservation tape masters; and VHS and DVD use copies of Waters' works. The collection contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters' film making, including: a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters to record financial and business information during the filming of Movies of Local People; photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; copy of a 2005 master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters.

The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and comprises primarily 16 mm black and white reversal original motion picture films created by Waters between 1936 and 1942 as he traveled across North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia filming the residents of small towns. Waters aimed to film as many residents in each community as possible, often setting up his camera at the main intersection in town to capture community members walking downtown. Waters also typically filmed school children entering or leaving school and workers arriving to or departing from mills, plants, and factories. Waters often included trick shots to engage his audience, such as trains moving backwards or children jumping in reverse. Although the films are dominated by shots of crowds and individual faces, Waters also captured a wide variety of activities, like school recitals, sports, mechanics at work, and manufacturing processes in factories.

The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, includes various preservation elements created from the original footage: 16 mm internegatives; 16 mm screening prints; 3/4 inch Umatic, Betacam SP, and Digital Betacam preservation tape masters; and VHS and DVD use copies of Waters' works. The majority of films represented in the collection are silent, black and white, and were filmed in North Carolina. The collection includes a small number of color films and one film with sound. Reels containing mixed black and white and color footage were separated into two reels based on picture characteristic during the preservation process.

The collection also contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters, including: photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; VHS copies of a news report and a film on Waters; a copy of the master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student Martin Johnson in 2005; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters. In addition, the collection contains a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters between the years of 1936 and 1942 to document his earnings from the Movies of Local People films. The logs provide information about film screenings in the towns that he visited, including the dates of the screenings, the theaters where the films played, admission prices, the number of tickets sold, and advertising revenues. See the digital collection to view the logbooks.

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Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts collection, 2012-2019 22.5 Linear Feet — 5 upright boxes; 1 record carton; 25 flat boxes; 2 shoeboxes; 2 oversize folders — 784.5 Gigabytes — Electronic files

Collection contains masters theses submitted by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program. Written theses formats include typescripts, handmade books, digital video, and audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of the students' multi-media performances and exhibit installations. Subjects include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; themes of social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs. Submission of work to the archival project is voluntary. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains masters theses submitted each year by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (MFA/EDA), beginning with 2015.

The collection is arranged by program year, then in two groups, Written These and Creative Theses. Written theses exist in both analog and electronic form; many include handmade books, digital video, or audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of multi-media performances and exhibit installations.

Themes range widely, and include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs.

Some authors have contributed both creative and written theses; others have elected to contribute only one or the other. Not all authors have both written and creative theses. Participation in the archival project is voluntary; not all graduates of the MFA EDA program submitted their work for inclusion in this archive.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Palestinian Student films, 2012-2019 35 items — 20 Gigabytes

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Thirty-five films by 36 Palestinian student filmmakers, created between 2012 and 2019, documenting or portraying the political context and lived experience in the West Bank and Gaza.

Thirty-five films by 36 Palestinian student filmmakers, created between 2012 and 2019, documenting or portraying the political context and lived experience in the West Bank and Gaza. The films were made in journalism, media, and film classes at nine Palestinian universities, and range from experimental and poetic, to documentary essay and ethnography, to scripted narrative fiction. The films are characterized by their high technical quality, their local feel and community-centered focus, and their varied expression of Palestinian identity. The filmmakers include Amjad Abu Baker, Lillian Al Azzeh, Mohammed Abd El Aziz Abu Hamam, Rayhan Abu Omar, Baha' Abu Shanab, Noor AbuGhaniah, Salah AbuNe'ma, Sarah AbuShusheh, Raja Ahmad, Mohammed Khatib, Alaa Alaloul, Mohammad Alazza, Mohamed Nayef Ahmed Ali, Mahmoud Awad, Shayma' Awadeh, Thaer Al Azzah, Alaa Dayeh, Omar Elemawi, Mohammed S. Ewais, Amjad M. A. Al Fayoumi, Sanabel Al-Hoot, Salam Yahya, Renad Nasser, Mohammad Houshieh, Lana Sadaqa, Wisam Al-Jafari, Yaser Jodallah, Ahmad Al-Bazz, Abeer Kaabnah, Aya Ahmed Matrabie, Ali Hamdan Okeh, Yousef Salhi, Mohammed Shalodi, Naser Shatat, Khaled Tuaima, and Tala Zeitawi. Formats include MOV, MP4, and MPEG2 video files.

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Talmage Farlow Documentary Film collection, 1979-2011 77 Linear Feet — circa 8000 Items

Filmmaker Lorenzo DeStefano directed and produced a documentary on jazz guitarist Talmage Farlow (1921-1998) titled Talmage Farlow (Productions A-Propos, 1981). The collection contains audio, moving image, and paper materials created and compiled by DeStefano during the production and distribution of the documentary and its related audio recordings.

The Talmage Farlow Documentary Film Collection consists of materials created and compiled by filmmaker Lorenzo DeStefano during the making of the film Talmage Farlow and several related audio recordings. The majority of the materials are in various audio and moving image formats, including 16mm and 35mm film, Hi8, Betacam SP, VHS, DVD, 1/4 inch and 1/2 inch open reel audio tape, audiocassette, and CD. These are located in the Audio and Moving Image Materials Series. The Paper Files Series includes materials maintained by DeStefano on the production, distribution, and marketing of the documentary and its related audio recordings.

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Terry Sanford and the New South records, 2000-2005 5.5 Linear Feet — 5 banker boxes, 1 cassette box

Terry Sanford and the New South, a documentary by filmmaker Thomas Lennon, examines Sanford's governorship in North Carolina during the Civil Rights movement and his vision of a New South. Sanford was governor of North Carolina, 1961-1965, and also served as President of Duke University, 1969-1985. This accession (2009-0169) (5.0 lin. ft.; 2000 items; dated 2000-2005) includes digital videotapes and duplicates from the production of Terry Sanford and the New South, as well as research notes, production notes and timelines, an index of filed images, and subject files for images used in the film. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts. The finished documentary, Terry Sanford and the New South, can be viewed through NCLive, http://media.nclive.org/play_video.php?vid=383.

This collection (5.0 lin. ft.; 2000 items; dated 2000-2005) includes digital videotapes and duplicates from the production of "Terry Sanford and the New South," as well as research notes, production notes and timelines, an index of filed images, and subject files for images used in the film. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Videos by Latina Women: New Visions of the Globalizing South, 2003 40 items — Electronic files including 11 PDFs, 17 TIFFs, and 12 MOVs — 8.27 Gigabytes

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Videos and fieldnotes created by students in 2003, in the CDS Continuing Education course "Visual Storytelling" in collaboration with 8 Latina immigrants. The course was taught by CDS Faculty member Nancy Kalow.

Materials include digital video, photographic, and text files for the project "Videos by Latina Women: New Visions of the Globalizing South," created as part of Nancy Kalow's Rockefeller Residency Fellowship. The 12 MOV video files are the documentaries produced during the year by the projects collaborators, including eight recently-arrived Latina immigrant women and the videographers who served as their mentors. The 17 TIFF photograph files are portraits of the creators and shots of them working. The 11 PDF text files include fieldnotes kept by the mentors, interview transcripts, correspondence, release forms, and papers, presentations, and conclusions about the project.