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Non-profit organization founded in 1975, based in Washington, DC, whose chief focus is promoting changes in U.S. foreign and military policy in support of global human rights. The records of the Center for International Policy (CIP) span the years 1960 to 2016, and document in detail the organization's global activities in support of human rights as well as its internal administration, funding, and public relations outreach. CIP's chief areas of interest lie in United States foreign and military policies, including the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA); topics cover human rights issues, U.S. relations with Central and South America, demilitarization, nuclear weapons, the Cuban trade embargo, money laundering and other aspects of international finance, terrorism, and the narcotics trade. The bulk of the files take the form of administrative files and records which contain correspondence, memos, data, reports, travel documents, and extensive files on other organizations; there are also many files of printed materials such as pamphlets, newsletters, and press releases.

The records of the Center for International Policy (CIP) span the years 1960 to 2016, and document in detail the organization's global activities in support of human rights as well as its internal administration, funding, and public relations outreach. CIP's chief areas of interest lie in documenting and reforming United States foreign and military policies, including the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Specific topics covered by materials in the collection include U.S. relations with Central and South America, particularly with Colombia, El Salvador, Haiti, and Cuba; U.S. relations with South and East Asia, particularly the Korean Peninsula; demilitarization in areas of conflict; nuclear weapons and the arms race; the Cuban trade embargo; money laundering and other aspects of international finance; terrorism in various countries; and the narcotics trade. The bulk of the files take the form of administrative files and records on other organizations which contain correspondence, memos, data, reports, travel documents, and extensive files; there are also many files containing printed materials such as pamphlets, newsletters, and press releases.

The CIP records are arranged in the following series: Development Files Series; Printed Materials Series; Oversize Materials Series; Robert White Papers Series; Adam Isacson Papers Series; Selig Harrison Papers Series; Wayne S. Smith Papers Series; Geographic, Subject, and Program Files Series; and Audiovisual Materials Series.

White's and Isacson's files retain their original arrangement into groups such as correspondence (some in digital form), research and subject files, speeches, and travel documentation. Harrison's files retain their original arrangment by region, such South and West Asia, East Asia and North Korea, while some materials have been removed to the Nuclear and Energy Subseries. The research files claim the largest proportion of the files for all individuals, and contain documentation on other organizations, individuals, and extensive information in particular on Central and South America and Asia. Other countries represented in the collection files to a lesser extent include Russia, Israel, Cuba and other countries surrounding the South and East Asia regions. Correspondence files are present throughout the collection, and include key individuals such as Iowa Senator Tom Harkin; Peter Dale Scott, former Canadian ambassador and political commentator; and Harrison Selig, Director of the Asia Program. Many other well-known politicians and activists are represented in smaller folders of materials; there are also a small number of administrative files related to internal staff members and board members. The development files reveal the nature of the CIP's fundraising activities, and the extent of support from charitable organizations; the most extensive files belong to the Ford Foundation, General Service Foundation, International Center for Development Policy, and the MacArthur Foundation; smaller files represent many other similar institutions.

Collection acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Esther Peterson (1906-1997) was a leader in consumer, labor and women's movements who served as the first Special Assistant to the President for Consumer Affairs. The Consumer Reports Esther Peterson papers include correspondence, clippings, photographs, texts of articles and speeches, reports, white papers, and other printed materials. The bulk of the collection documents Peterson's work after leaving government in 1981, especially with the International Organization of Consumer's Unions (IOCU) through the 1980s and early 1990s as well as her involvement with consumer and women's movements. Key correspondents include Peter Hansen, Joan Claybrook, Ralph Nader, and Gus Yatron. Institutions represented include Aetna Insurance, American Council on Consumer Interests (ACCI), Centre for Our Common Future, Consumer Federation of America, Consumer Insurance Interest Group (CIIG), Consumer Product Safety Commission, Consumers Union, IOCU, Professional Insurance Agents (PIA), the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the United Nations Commission on Transnational Corporations, and the U.S. Office of Consumer Affairs. Topics addressed include: consumer advocacy and protection, environmental regulation, particularly the regulation of pesticides, chemicals, and hazardous substances; insurance and health care, especially women's health and long-term care for the elderly; international development and trade; pharmaceutical exports; and transnational corporations. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Consumer Reports Esther Peterson papers include correspondence, clippings, photographs, texts of articles and speeches, reports, white papers, and other printed materials. The bulk of the collection documents Peterson's work after leaving government in 1981, especially with the International Organization of Consumer's Unions (IOCU) through the 1980s and early 1990s as well as her involvement with consumer and women's movements. Key correspondents include Peter Hansen, Joan Claybrook, Ralph Nader, and Gus Yatron. Institutions represented include Aetna Insurance, American Council on Consumer Interests (ACCI), Centre for Our Common Future, Consumer Federation of America, Consumer Insurance Interest Group (CIIG), Consumer Product Safety Commission, Consumers Union, IOCU, Professional Insurance Agents (PIA), the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the United Nations Commission on Transnational Corporations, and the U.S. Office of Consumer Affairs. Topics addressed include: consumer advocacy and protection, environmental regulation, particularly the regulation of pesticides, chemicals, and hazardous substances; insurance and health care, especially women's health and long-term care for the elderly; international development and trade; pharmaceutical exports; and transnational corporations.

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Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Florence Mason served as Librarian and Assistant to the Director at Consumers Union and correspondent to the United Nations for the International Organization of Consumers' Unions' (now Consumers International). The Florence Mason papers include correspondence, meeting minutes and notes, newsletters and periodicals, reports and other printed materials that primarily document Mason's work with the International Organization of Consumers Unions (IOCU). Topics addressed include consumer protection and education, food issues, economic development, humanitarian assistance, as well as issues relating to women in rural and developing areas. Several files relate to correspondence with Colston Warne, Director of Consumers Union. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Florence Mason papers include correspondence, meeting minutes and notes, newsletters and periodicals, reports and other printed materials that primarily document Mason's work with the International Organization of Consumers Unions (IOCU). Topics addressed include consumer protection and education, food issues, economic development, humanitarian assistance, as well as issues relating to women in rural and developing areas. Several files relate to correspondence with Colston Warne, Director of Consumers Union.

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Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Sylvia Lane was an economist who served on the Board of Directors of Consumers Union 1975-1977. The Sylvia Lane papers consist primarily of drafts, notes, reprints and published reports of Lane's advocacy and professional research writings. Subjects include consumer education, credit and credit discrimination, economic development, food distribution, health and medical care costs, housing and real estate, low-income communities and individuals, and sales and other taxes. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Sylvia Lane papers consist primarily of drafts, notes, reprints and published reports of Lane's advocacy and professional research writings. Subjects include consumer education, credit and credit discrimination, economic development, food distribution, health and medical care costs, housing and real estate, low-income communities and individuals, and sales and other taxes.

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Economist and faculty member of Washington University in Saint Louis, Mo., and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1993. The papers of Douglass C. North date from 1942-2012 and consist chiefly of professional correspondence written and received by North, writings by North and other colleagues (the largest group), and files on conferences attended by North; there are also some teaching materials. The collection documents North's career as an economist and professor at Berkeley, University of Washington, Rice University, and Washington University (Missouri), and reflects his interests in economics, the economic history of the western world, transaction costs, economic development, institutional change, and industrialization and technology. Among the correspondents are many noted economists, including Yoram Barzel, Robert Bates, Reuven Brenner, Robert Clower, R. H. Coase, Robert Fogel, Robert Haveman, Robert Keohane, Simon Kuznets, Deirdre N. McCloskey, Elinor Ostrom, Vernon Smith, T. N. Srinivasan, John J. Wallis, and Barry R. Weingast.

The papers of university professor and Nobel Prize-winning economist Douglass C. North span the dates 1942-2012, with most of the papers being dated between 1970 and 2012. They consist chiefly of professional correspondence written and received by North, writings by North and other colleagues, and files on conferences attended by North. There are also materials relating to courses he taught. The collection documents North's career as an economist and professor at Berkeley, University of Washington, Rice University, and Washington University (Missouri), and reflects his interests in economics, the economic history of the western world, transaction costs, economic development, institutional change, and industrialization and technology. More specifically, the papers document his long-standing interest in explaining institutional change and political economies without relying exclusively on neo-classical economic theories. His political economy draw him closer to approaches of classical political economy.

Among the correspondents are many noted economists, including Yoram Barzel, Robert Bates, Reuven Brenner, Robert Clower, R.H. Coase, Robert Fogel, Robert Haveman, Robert Keohane, Simon Kuznets, Deirdre N. McCloskey, Emily Chamlee-Wright, Elinor Ostrom, Vernon Smith, T.N. Srinivasan, John J. Wallis and Barry R. Weingast. Some of these correspondents are also represented in the Writings Series of this collection, a large group which contains drafts, notes, and reprints of writings by North as well as writings by his colleagues.

North's secretary Fannie Batt is an important factor for a proper understanding of the nature of this collection. After receiving the Nobel Prize in 1993, North's correspondence expanded substantially. Fannie Batt, his secretary at the Washington University in St. Louis, was tasked to take care of the correspondence for North. Her role impacted the subsequent arrangement of the collection. Materials are often Fannie Batt's printouts of correspondence for North. Most of the correspondence since the 1990s is carried through Fannie Batt's email address. Also, North's own responses to emails are not as frequent in the collection as one would expect. Existing responses were often dictated by North and typed by Fannie Batt.

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The papers of Evsey Domar span the years 1939 through 1995, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1957 and 1989. The collection consists chiefly of professional correspondence between Domar and his colleagues, with smaller groups of materials consisting of writings; research materials; printed materials; speeches and lectures; and course materials relating to Domar's teaching career. Although Domar was interested in a wide range of subjects in the fields of economics and political science, the papers in this collection chiefly address his work on serfdom and slavery, particularly in Russia; the economics of socialist systems of government; the economics of agriculture; and theories of productivity and efficiency. Other minor topics include macroeconomics; the economies of Yugoslavia and Lithuania; value-added tax systems; economic development, and growth in general, and the American economy.

The Correspondence Series consists of professional correspondence concerning recommendations, papers, publishing, trip planning and reports, invitation responses, and other academic affairs. Frequently Domar exchanged comments on papers and other writings with fellow colleagues and former students. Important correspondents include Don Patinkin, Mark Perlman, Allan Brown, Alexander Gerschenkron, Lauchlin Currie, Alvin Hansen, Joan Robinson, and many others.

The Research Materials Series contains papers documenting Domar's research on serfdom and slavery (particularly in Russia); productivity and efficiency; value-added taxes; and other topics. Several papers discuss the economies of Yugoslavia and Lithuania. Includes many graphs and tables relating to Domar's published and unpublished work. There are very few papers by other individuals.

The Printed Materials Series is made up of mostly hardcover books from Domar's personal library. Most are editions or translations of his own published works, but there are several works by other authors. Includes microfilm of 1904 Russian work on unknown subject matter, and 1980 translation of 1861 Russian work on serfdom in Russia.

The Course Materials Series contains lecture notes and other materials related to Domar's extensive teaching career in economics. Two notebooks from 1939 and 1940 reveal aspects of his student years

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The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is the largest film festival in the United States entirely devoted to documentary film. Originally the DoubleTake Documentary Film Festival, it is an international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of non-fiction cinema, held annually since 1998 in downtown Durham, North Carolina. Typically, more than 100 films are screened, along with discussions, panels, and workshops fostering conversation between filmmakers, film professionals and the public. The Full Frame Archive was created in 2007, as a partnership between Duke University and Full Frame. The Full Frame Archive Film Collection comprises preservation masters of documentary films that won awards at the Full Frame Film Festival between 1998 and 2012. Formats include 35mm film, 16mm film, Digital Betacam cassette, HDCAM cassette, Betacam SP cassette, and DVD. In addition, there is a complete set of festival program books. The films vary widely in topic and style, with a predominant emphasis on human rights issues; all of the films deal with social issues in one way or another. The collection is organized chronologically, by festival year, and acquisitions are ongoing.

The Full Frame Archive comprises program material, publicity-related material, and preservation masters of award-winning documentary films at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival (formerly DoubleTake) between 1998 and 2017. Film formats include 35mm film, 16mm film, Digital Betacam cassette, HDCAM cassette, Betacam SP cassette, and DVD. In addition, the collection contains festival program books, postcards, movie posters, t-shirts, tote bags, advertisements, newspaper clippings, press releases, and newspaper inserts.

The collection is organized chronologically, by festival year. Each series in the collection includes all acquired award winners from one year and available program material, when available. Each subseries comprises all the elements for one documentary work.

Whenever possible, the film is preserved on 35mm film, a duplicate preservation master especially created for this collection; occasionally, the work was originally filmed on 35mm, but more often it was recorded digitally and then transferred to film for festival screenings and theatrical release. Many films were never transferred to film, and in those cases, the highest quality digital master has been preserved, usually on Digital Betacam cassette, cloned from the master provided by the filmmaker or production company; other digital formats are represented as well.

While all are documentary films, some may also be considered belonging to the genres of biographical nonfiction, ethnographic, ethnic nonfiction and music. Feature, short and animation forms are all represented. The films vary widely in topic and style, with a predominant emphasis on human rights issues. All of the films deal with social issues in one way or another, including topics such as gender; family relations; education; life cycles (childhood, aging, death, etc.); crime and justice; minority groups and discrimination; public health; humanitarian aid; technology and social life; migration; democracy; economic development; war and conflict; peace and healing; art and society; religion; rehabilitation; etc.

Competition for awards has always been international; though the majority of award-winners are from and about the United States, the collection is also notably strong on topics relating to Africa and the Middle East. Only films completed within one year of the festival were eligible for competition, thus all are contemporary to the festival date. The number and type of awards given at the Festival changed from year to year; thus, each year is represented by a different number of films, selected according to varying criteria.

The Full Frame Archive was begun in late 2007 and acquisitions are ongoing. The films are donated by the filmmaker and/or copyright holder. Although the intent is to eventually preserve every Full Frame award winner, this may not be possible, as some copyright holders may decline to donate their work.

These preservation masters are stored in a climate-controlled facility off-site and may not be viewed. For viewing purposes, DVD use copies are available, backed up by a DVD master, also stored off-site.

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Gerald M. Meier papers, 1928-2003 7.75 Linear Feet — 5400 Items

The papers of Gerald M. Meier span the years 1928-2003, with the bulk of the materials from 1941-2001. These materials document the growth of Meier's career from a student of economics to an academic economist. This collection includes personal and professional correspondence; lectures; course notes taken as a student or developed for his lectures on international economic relations; syllabi, reading lists, exams, and other course materials; materials relating to conferences attended; published writings; and audiotapes of interviews relating to the evolution of development economics. The Correspondence Series is largely of a professional nature, and is chiefly concerned with international and development economics. Prominent among Meier's correspondents were Peter Bauer, Gottfried Haberler, W.A. Lewis, Hla Myint, Paul Rosenstein-Rodan, W.W. Rostow, Dudley Seers, H.W. Singer, and Paul Streeten.

Many of Meier's major publications are represented in the Writings and Speeches Series. These include Economic Development, Emerging from Poverty, The International Economics of Development, International Trade and Development, Leading Issues in Development Economics, Pioneers in Development, and the Problems series of books. Though there are more than a few folders containing materials on conferences attended by Meier, by and large the Subject Series contains a great deal of course materials. From his days as a student, there are notes, exams, syllabi, reading lists, and bibliographies from Reed College, Harvard University, and University of Oxford concerning courses taken under Edward Chamberlin, Gottfried Haberler, John Hicks, Wassily Leontief, and others. Also, there is material representing the several law courses Meier enrolled in at Yale University and Stanford University. Among the lecture notes from Williams College, Wesleyan University, Yale University, and Stanford University, there are also syllabi, exams, and reading lists representing his tenure as a professor. Of particular note are the several folders concerning Meier's role in the genesis and growth of the College of Social Studies at Wesleyan University.

Accession (2010-0211) also contains work from Meier's career, including reprints of his articles (dated 1949-1984) and materials from his lectures and presentations on development economics (dated 1986-2002). Also included are some miscellaneous correspondence, grant proposals, and book reviews. A large portion of the accession relates to Meier's writings, including his drafts and correspondence from several books, especially Frontiers of Development Economics (published 2001) and Development: Biography of a Subject (published 2004). Another section of interest is Meier's collection of materials on the career of John Hicks, a 1972 Nobel prize-winning economist. The collection includes article reprints written by Hicks, some clippings about his life, and an undated, unpublished manuscript titled "The Theory of Demand and the Theory of Welfare."

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Lloyd B. Saville papers, 1936-1979 1.5 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

Lloyd B. Saville was an educator, researcher, scholar and economist, specializing in economic history and theory. His career at Duke University spanned the years 1946-1979 and encompassed teaching, administration, research, and publication. Collection contains correspondence, manuscripts, grant applications, exam questions, printed matter, newspaper clippings, reports and other materials concerning international economic studies, seminars and societies, and Saville's teaching and research interests. Materials range in date from 1936-1979, bulk 1950-1979.

Collection contains correspondence, manuscripts, scholarly papers, grant applications, exam questions, printed matter, newspaper clippings, reports and other materials concerning international economic studies, seminars and societies, and Saville's teaching/ research interests. Correspondents include Calvin B. Hoover and economists in Italy. Materials range in date from 1936-1979, bulk 1950-1979.

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Robert M. Solow papers, 1951-2011 and undated 63.1 Linear Feet — 45,300 Items

Nobel Prize-winning economist and economics professor emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Robert M. Solow Papers span the years 1951-2011 and document the full scope of his professional, scholarly, and academic work. The majority of the collection consists of correspondence (1960-2011) with students, colleagues, and other economists, and it includes his reviews of papers by other scholars, referee reports, letters of recommendation, articles written for the public, professional correspondence as well as policy recommendations. The papers also contain lecture notes for courses Solow taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1972-1996); published papers by Solow on macroeconomics, growth theory, linear programming, and other topics (1950-2011); and files from economic, academic, and governmental organizations in which he served, including the American Economics Association and the Econometrics Society, and the Council of Economic Advisors to the White House. The collection is divided into the following series: Correspondence, Teaching Materials, Published Papers and Writings, Professional Service, and Audiovisual Materials.

The papers of Nobel Prize-winning economist Robert M. Solow span the years 1951-2011 and document his professional, scholarly, and academic work. The majority of the collection consists of voluminous files of correspondence (1960-2011) with students, colleagues, and other economists, and it includes his reviews of papers by other scholars, referee reports, letters of recommendation articles for the public, professional correspondence as well as policy recommendations. The papers also contain lecture notes for courses Solow taught at MIT (1972-1996); published papers by Solow on macroeconomics, growth theory, linear programming, and other topics (1950-2011); and files from economic, academic, and governmental organizations in which he served, including the American Economics Association, the National Bureau of Economic Research, and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. The published papers series also contains notes and rough drafts on topics such as econometrics, employment (specifically the theory of unemployment) and growth policies, macroeconomics, and the theory of capital. There is also some material on the Neo-classical Growth Model, also known as the Solow-Swan Growth Model (1956).

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series is subdivided into three groups: Chronological Correspondence, Alphabetical Correspondence, and Recommendations. The first two consist of correspondence from students, colleagues, and collaborators, with some responses from Solow included. The exchanges include economists such as Kenneth Arrow, Olivier Blanchard, Alan Blinder, Partha Dasgupta, Frank Hahn, Paul Samuelson, and James Tobin. The alphabetical correspondence dating from 1951-1976, is similar in content to the chronological correspondence but smaller in size; it also contains more pieces related to organizations and businesses. The Alphabetical Correspondence (Recommendations) dating from 1971-1986, is the smallest of the three and consists of requests for and the subsequent letters of recommendation from Solow for either students or professional economists.

The Teaching Materials Series houses the teaching materials generated from Solow's MIT economics courses (spanning an approximate 30 years of his 40 year MIT career) as well as the notes and materials used for lectures given at other forums and institutions. These materials consist of reading lists, syllabi, outlines, exams, problem sets and their solutions, homework, waivers, attendance rosters, assignments, spiral notebooks of economic equations, and personal preparatory notes handwritten by Solow.

Nearly all of Solow's major publications and co-publications (see bibliography for the few exceptions) are found in the Published Papers and Writings Series. These include his Ph.D. thesis, speeches, lectures, invited lectures, panel discussions, op-ed pieces, journal articles, brochures, pamphlets, reviews of his works and his responses to the reviews, Congressional testimony, and memorial tributes, as well as the rough drafts and notes for these documents.

The Professional Service Series includes varied documents associated with the groups Robert Solow was either a member of, held a position in, wrote pieces for, or supported. Files contain correspondence, meeting minutes, proposals, reports, publications, votes, elections, and financial reports. The largest organizations represented in this series are the American Economic Association and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.

Four videos featuring Solow are collected in the Audio Visual Series. Materials date from 2003 to 2009. Within the series, one item is recorded on a VHS cassette and the rest are in DVD format.