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Collection

Arthur I. Bloomfield papers, 1927-1995 and undated 12 Linear Feet — Approximately 7200 items

The papers of university professor and economist Arthur Bloomfield consist chiefly of research files from his job as economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 1941-1958, professional and academic correspondence received or written from 1931 to 1995, research notes on various topics in international finance, notes for his university classes on the history of economic thought, and research files on the pre-1914 gold standard. The papers document Bloomfield's career as economist and professor of economics, with special emphasis on his work as economic consultant for the United States federal government, particularly for the New York Federal Reserve Bank, and for the governments of post-World War II South Korea and Indochina. His chief areas of research activity focused on international banking, evaluating foreign aid programs, the pre-1914 gold standard, and economic development in the U.K. and British Commonwealth countries (including the British West Indies), and economy and banking in Malaysia, the Congo, and Zaire. Substantial materials on the history of economic thought can be found in Bloomfield's teaching files.

The papers of university professor and economist Arthur Bloomfield span the period from 1927 to 1995. They consist chiefly of research files from his job as economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 1941-1958, professional and academic correspondence received or written from 1931 to 1995, research notes on various topics in international finance, notes for his university classes on the history of economic thought, and research files on the pre-1914 gold standard. The papers document Bloomfield's career as economist and professor of economics, with special emphasis on his work as economic consultant for the United States federal government, particularly for the New York Federal Reserve Bank, and for the governments of post-World War II South Korea and Indochina. His chief areas of research activity focused on international banking, evaluating foreign aid programs, the pre-1914 gold standard, and economic development in the U.K. and British Commonwealth countries (including the British West Indies), and economy and banking in Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, the Congo, and Zaire. Substantial materials on the history of economic thought can be found in Bloomfield's teaching files. The collection is comprised of six series: Correspondence Series, Incoming and Outgoing; Federal Reserve Bank of New York Series; Pre-1914 Gold Standard Series; History of Economic Thought Series; Research Files Series; and Miscellaneous Series.

The Correspondence Series, Incoming and Outgoing, contains letters received or written by Bloomfield over the period 1931 to 1995. Arranged in folders chronologically, this substantive collection of letters lends insight into Bloomfield's professional and academic life.

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York Series contains material pertaining to Bloomfield's first career, spanning 17 years, as an economist at the New York Federal Reserve Bank. For that position he wrote a number of research memoranda and in-house articles on a wide range of international finance topics. Before World War II he wrote mostly on economic developments in the U.K. and British Commonwealth countries, but after the war his research memoranda involved a broader range of topics.

The Pre-1914 Gold Standard Series contains research notes for an intended book on the functioning of the international gold standard, 1880-1914. Bloomfield embarked on a year-long research trip to Europe in 1957 on a Rockefeller grant, visiting twelve European central banks, including the Bank of England where he spent over six months. In the end, he did not complete the book, but did write three substantial monographs from his notes: Monetary Policy under the International Gold Standard, 1880-1914 (Fed. Reserve Bank NY, 1959); Short-term Capital Movements under the Pre-1914 Gold Standard (Princeton Univ. Press, 1963); and Patterns of Fluctuation in International Investment before 1914 (Princeton Univ. Press, 1968). Although these books are not in the collection, this series contains one file folder for many countries or geographical areas, including: Switzerland, U.S.A., Sweden, Norway, Italy, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Egypt, France, Canada, U.K., Japan, Germany, Finland, Denmark, Russia, Belgium, Netherlands, Austria, and Hungary.

The History of Economic Thought Series is an extensive collection of files on diverse topics in the history of economic thought. After 1974 Bloomfield's research became increasingly devoted to the history of economic thought, and he taught both graduate and undergraduate level classes on the subject at the University of Pennsylvania.

The Research Files Series contains research notes associated with various overseas assignments and trips. Over the period 1949-1984, Bloomfield made numerous trips to developing countries as a consultant, in some cases helping to establish the Central Bank (e.g. South Korea), or in other cases evaluating foreign aid programs to those areas (e.g. Indochina). In addition to notes made in preparation for, and during, these assignments, this series also contains notes for several articles (published and unpublished), speeches, and conferences.

The bulk of the Miscellaneous Series consists of papers from Bloomfield's undergraduate days at McGill University, including one paper written in 1937 for Frank Knight's ECO 305 class at the University of Chicago, titled "Thorstein Veblen and his Analysis of Business Enterprise."

Collection
Economist and faculty member of Washington University in Saint Louis, Mo., and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1993. The papers of Douglass C. North date from 1942-2012 and consist chiefly of professional correspondence written and received by North, writings by North and other colleagues (the largest group), and files on conferences attended by North; there are also some teaching materials. The collection documents North's career as an economist and professor at Berkeley, University of Washington, Rice University, and Washington University (Missouri), and reflects his interests in economics, the economic history of the western world, transaction costs, economic development, institutional change, and industrialization and technology. Among the correspondents are many noted economists, including Yoram Barzel, Robert Bates, Reuven Brenner, Robert Clower, R. H. Coase, Robert Fogel, Robert Haveman, Robert Keohane, Simon Kuznets, Deirdre N. McCloskey, Elinor Ostrom, Vernon Smith, T. N. Srinivasan, John J. Wallis, and Barry R. Weingast.

The papers of university professor and Nobel Prize-winning economist Douglass C. North span the dates 1942-2012, with most of the papers being dated between 1970 and 2012. They consist chiefly of professional correspondence written and received by North, writings by North and other colleagues, and files on conferences attended by North. There are also materials relating to courses he taught. The collection documents North's career as an economist and professor at Berkeley, University of Washington, Rice University, and Washington University (Missouri), and reflects his interests in economics, the economic history of the western world, transaction costs, economic development, institutional change, and industrialization and technology. More specifically, the papers document his long-standing interest in explaining institutional change and political economies without relying exclusively on neo-classical economic theories. His political economy draw him closer to approaches of classical political economy.

Among the correspondents are many noted economists, including Yoram Barzel, Robert Bates, Reuven Brenner, Robert Clower, R.H. Coase, Robert Fogel, Robert Haveman, Robert Keohane, Simon Kuznets, Deirdre N. McCloskey, Emily Chamlee-Wright, Elinor Ostrom, Vernon Smith, T.N. Srinivasan, John J. Wallis and Barry R. Weingast. Some of these correspondents are also represented in the Writings Series of this collection, a large group which contains drafts, notes, and reprints of writings by North as well as writings by his colleagues.

North's secretary Fannie Batt is an important factor for a proper understanding of the nature of this collection. After receiving the Nobel Prize in 1993, North's correspondence expanded substantially. Fannie Batt, his secretary at the Washington University in St. Louis, was tasked to take care of the correspondence for North. Her role impacted the subsequent arrangement of the collection. Materials are often Fannie Batt's printouts of correspondence for North. Most of the correspondence since the 1990s is carried through Fannie Batt's email address. Also, North's own responses to emails are not as frequent in the collection as one would expect. Existing responses were often dictated by North and typed by Fannie Batt.

Collection
Nobel-prize winning economist, Professor at Arizona State University, and economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. The collection contains drafts and published copies of Prescott's research papers and other writings, professional correspondence, files from speaking engagements and presentations, and teaching materials from his career at Carnegie-Mellon University, the University of Minnesota, and Arizona State University.

The collection contains drafts and published copies of Prescott's research papers and other writings, writings by others, professional correspondence, files from speaking engagements and presentations, and teaching materials from his career at Carnegie-Mellon University, the University of Minnesota, and Arizona State University.

The Writings series contains drafts and published copies of research papers and academic articles written by Prescott and co-authors, including his 1964 dissertation "Adaptive Decision Rules for Macro Economic Planning" as well as writings with co-recipient of the Nobel Prize, Finn E. Kydland. They are arranged chronologically by publication date.

The Writings by Others series includes articles and other writings on economics collected by Prescott for his own research or interest. Arranged chronologically.

Engagements series includes materials from lectures, presentations, and speeches given by Prescott. Arranged chronologically.

Correspondence series contains letters, memos, and emails received or written by Prescott. General correspondence arranged chronologically. Other correspondence arranged by subject matter as provided by Prescott.

Teaching Materials series contains syllabi, lecture notes, exams, correspondence, and other preparatory materials for courses taught by Prescott at Carnegie-Mellon University, the University of Minnesota, and Arizona State University. Arranged chronologically.

Collection

Lawrence Klein papers, 1950s-2010 52.5 Linear Feet — 40,000 items

Nobel-prize winning economist and professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. Collection includes Klein's correspondence, writings and drafts, economic research and subject files, organizational papers, and dissertations from Klein's many students. Contains significant amount of material from Project LINK, particularly from the late 1960s. Audiovisual recordings of the first LINK conference in 1969 will require reformatting prior to use. Also includes files from Klein's presidency of the National Academy of Science, his professorship at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, and printouts from early economic computer programs and experiments.

The collection includes Klein's correspondence, writings and drafts, economic research and subject files, organizational papers, and dissertations from Klein's many students. It contains significant amount of material from Project LINK, particularly from the late 1960s. Audiovisual recordings of the first LINK conference in 1969 will require reformatting prior to use. Also included are files from Klein's presidency of the National Academy of Science, his professorship at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, and printouts from early economic computer programs and experiments.

The Dissertations series includes copies and drafts of dissertations and theses written by Klein's students and advisees during his tenure at the University of Pennsylvania. They are arranged in alphabetical order by the author's name.

The Subjects, Organizations, and Research series includes subject files and materials on various publications, research topics, projects, and organizations with which Klein worked. This series includes many materials from his career at the University of Pennsylvania, including teaching materials and committee information, as well as his presidency of the National Academy of Sciences. It has been arranged alphabetically by folder title.

The Project LINK series contains records related to that project, for which Klein served as principal investigator along with Bert Hickman, Rudolf Rhomberg, and Aaron Gordon. Included are materials from various meetings, research materials, and reports.

The Computer Printouts series contains computer printouts from an unknown project, possibly Project LINK, dating from the early 1980s.

The Correspondence series contains letters, memos, and faxes received or written by Klein. Much of the correspondence was exchanged with colleagues in the field of economics, and reflects collaborative research endeavors. Arranged loosely by correspondent within each year. Not every year has incoming correspondence.

Writings by Klein includes papers and speeches written by Lawrence Klein for journals, newspapers, editorials, and congressional testimony.

Writings by Others includes non-dissertation writings on economics collected by Klein for his own research or interest.

Audiovisual Materials contains audio recordings of the first worldwide Project LINK conference in 1969. This material will need to be reformatted prior to use.

There is also a small amount of Unsorted Miscellaneous material.

In addition, a small amount of electronic media has been removed from the collection and transferred to Duke's server. Please contact Research Services for access to this material.

Collection
Economist, university professor, and author in Austria and U.S., born Carl Friedrich Alfred Oskar Morgenstern in Germany. The papers of Oskar Morgenstern, who is associated with the Austrian School of Economics, span the years 1866-1992, although the bulk of the materials date from 1917 to 1977. They consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, printed material, audiovisual material, manuscript and printed writings and their supporting papers, and biographical and bibliographical information about his career and publications. The collection principally concerns Morgenstern's work as an economic theorist, university professor, author and lecturer, and consultant to business and government.

The papers of Oskar Morgenstern, who is associated with the Austrian school of economics, span the years 1866-1992, although the bulk of the materials date from 1917 to 1977. They consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, printed material, audiovisual material, manuscript and printed writings and their supporting papers, and biographical and bibliographical information about his career and publications. The collection principally concerns Morgenstern's work as an economic theorist, university professor, author and lecturer, and consultant to business and government.

The first two decades of Morgenstern's career as an economist, the 1920s and 1930s, were associated with the University of Vienna where he was educated and was a faculty member until his emigration to the United States in 1938. He published major books about economic forecasting (1928) and the limits of economics (1934) and numerous other writings in which the subjects of business cycles, prices, the depression of the 1930s, economic conditions in Europe and America, currency and exchange, and economic history and theory are prominent. Information about them is scattered throughout the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, and Subject Files Series. Morgenstern's interests and correspondents were international, although principally European and American. A considerable part of the correspondence and writings during these years, and all of the diaries, are written in German. English is also prominent, and other languages also occur.

Morgenstern's output of publications during the 1940s, his first decade at Princeton University, was less extensive than in the 1930s, but he and John von Neumann published their classic Theory of Games and Economic Behavior in 1944. As Princeton editor Sanford G. Thatcher wrote in 1987, in sheer intellectual influence, it probably has stimulated more creative thinking, in a wider variety of fields of scholarship, than any other single book Princeton University Press has published. Information about this book and subsequent international developments in game theory pervades the Correspondence, Subject Files, and Writings and Speeches Series until Morgenstern's death. The elaboration of game theory was not only theoretical but also practical, and Morgenstern's writings and projects illustrate its applications, especially in U.S. military and foreign policy during the Cold War.

The Writings and Speeches Series, including the diaries, and the Subject Files Series are extensive for the 1940s as they are for the later decades of Morgenstern's career. The Correspondence Series, however, is extensive only for the 1920s, 1930s, and 1970s. Part of his correspondence apparently did not survive. However, Morgenstern routinely placed letters and other material in his files for subjects and writings, and many letters are to be found there. There are a number of letters for some correspondents, but extensive correspondence with an individual is not characteristic of this collection. A person's letters may be filed in more than one chronological group of correspondence.

Morgenstern published prolifically during the 1950s to 1970s. His major books focused on accuracy in economics (1950), organization (1951), national defense (1958), international finance and business cycles (1959), the peaceful uses of underground nuclear explosions (1967), stock market prices (1970), political, economic, and military forecasting (1973), and expanding and contracting economies in various societies (1976). These books and numerous articles and reviews reveal his interest in economic theory, international economic problems, and the application of mathematics and economics to public policy problems. The Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, and Correspondence Series document many of his publications and such topics as the Cold War, nuclear issues, military and naval affairs (especially the U.S. Navy), defense, space, economic analysis, game theory, the stock market, business cycles, mathematics and economics, statistical validity, and his work with John von Neumann, Martin Shubik, Friedrich A. von Hayek, Gottfried Haberler, Antonio de Viti de Marco, Eveline Burns, Gerald L. Thompson, N. N. Vorob'ev, and others.

Morgenstern taught at Princeton until his retirement in 1970 when be began teaching at New York University, and both schools are represented, particularly in the Subject Files Series. These files and the Writings and Speeches Series document his relationship with public and private organizations, especially the Office of Naval Research, the Rand Corporation, various foundations and scholarly societies, and Mathematica, a consulting firm that did contract work for government and business. Morgenstern was co-founder of Mathematica. The Mathematica Series contains correspondence, memos, policy reports, project proposals, and research papers. The institutions that are often mentioned include NASA, Office of Naval Research, and Sandia Corporation. Topics, among others, relate to analysis of military conflicts, economics of the space program, management research, or peaceful use of nuclear energy. Some materials related to Mathematica Series are still scattered across the rest of the collection.

Morgenstern habitually incorporated into his files pertinent thoughts or information that might be useful for later consideration. Consequently, the Subject Files and Writings and Speeches Series often include letters, memoranda, lecture notes, writings by others, mathematics, printed material, and other Items. Thus, a file for a topic or publication in 1963 may contain relevant dated material from other years and decades.

The diaries, 1917-1977, are relatively complete, but Morgenstern did not write daily or every month. There are significant gaps: 1918-1920; Feb.-May 1938; March 1946-Jan. 1947; and Sept. 1951-Feb. 1952. Shorter gaps also occur in April-May 1924, Sept. 1925; June-July 1948; and April 1949. The diaries are in the Writings and Speeches Series.

Morgenstern's library of printed material was donated to New York University.

Addition (06-067) (2452 items, 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 1935-1976) contains primarily published works by Morgenstern and his major co-authors such as John von Neumann and Gerald L. Thompson in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and German arranged in alphabetical order. Important works contained in this series include typed manuscript portions of Theory of Games and Economic Behavior with annotations, draft chapters of the Question of National Defense, Long Term Planning with Models of Static and Dynamic Open Expanding Economies, the Mathematica Economic Analysis of the Space Shuttle System and some correspondence, as well as supporting documentation and statistics. There are also three audiotape reels with Morgenstern's lectures.

Collection

Paul A. Samuelson papers, 1933-2010 and undated 119 Linear Feet — Approx. 88,950 Items

Online
Paul A. Samuelson was a Nobel Prize-winning economist and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Paul Samuelson papers span the years 1933 to 2010 and cover nearly all aspects of his long career. The collection is arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Awards, Committees and Projects, Correspondence, Printed Materials, Speeches and Interviews, Teaching Materials, and Unpublished Writings. Significant correspondents include Milton Friedman, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, and many other notable economists, Nobel prize winners, politicians, and scientists. Researchers will find materials representing Samuelson's work on diverse topics of economic theory, including the history of economic thought (post-Keynesian economics, neoclassical economics, and thinkers such as Marx, Sraffa and Ricardo), financial economics, growth theory, international finance, inflation, stability, welfare economics, post-World War economic policies and stabilization, stochastic analysis, utility, monetary policy, Marxist economics, biological economics - including population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematical economics. Finally, the Samuelson Papers also document his strong contributions to the U.S. government, especially his work for the Federal Reserve, and to federally-funded projects, professional committees and boards, and organizations and societies, beginning in the 1940s and continuing throughout his career.

The Paul A. Samuelson Papers span the years 1933 to 2010, and cover nearly all aspects of his long career. Materials are arranged in the original order maintained by Samuelson, and include his professional correspondence files; unpublished writings, notes, drafts and fragments; audiovisual materials; documents regarding awards, including the Nobel Prize; files relating to various grants, committees, and projects; teaching materials from his years at MIT; files of speeches; and publication files, including professional and mainstream media articles. Significant correspondents include Milton Friedman, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, as well as many other notable economists, Nobel prize winners, politicians, and scientists. Material can also be found on economic programs at institutions such as MIT, where Samuelson established a renowned economics faculty. Researchers will find materials representing Samuelson's work on diverse topics of economic theory, including the history of economic thought (post-Keynesian economics, neoclassical economics, and thinkers such as Marx, Sraffa and Ricardo), financial economics, growth theory, international finance, inflation, stability, welfare economics, post-World War economic policies and stabilization, stochastic analysis, utility, monetary policy, Marxist economics, biological economics - including population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematical economics. Samuelson's insights on many of these subjects serve as organizational themes for large sections in the Unpublished Writings Series in the collection. Finally, the Samuelson Papers also document his strong contributions to the U.S. government, especially his work for the Federal Reserve, and to federally-funded projects, professional committees and boards, and organizations and societies, beginning in the 1940s and continuing throughout his career.

The Correspondence Series spans Samuelson's entire career, beginning in the 1930s. It consists mainly of professional exchanges with his colleagues in the U.S. and other countries. There are also files of correspondence with a wide variety of political and academic figures, presses, and media organizations. There is frequent correspondence with President Kennedy, for whom he was an economic advisor. Besides the named folders that represent notable economists such as Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Franco Modigliani, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, there are general correspondence folders in which a variety of documents are chronologically arranged. There is also a large group of files relating to the publication of his textbooks. Additional correspondence can be found in almost all the other series. A more detailed documentation of the Correspondence Series and its correspondents can be found in the series description.

A large series of Unpublished Writings contains many folders of unpublished articles, extensive research notes, jotted-down insights, and other fragmentary writings. The earliest pieces appear to be a typescript of Samuelson's 1933 diary and writings on collective bargaining (1933-1934). The wide range of topics in economic theory as well as the history of economics reflects Samuelson's interests over many decades, beginning with his work on Marx and the Transformation Problem, and later on, focusing more specifically on financial economics. The unpublished writings also reveal that he also wrote extensively on population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematics.

The equally large Printed Materials Series houses a nearly complete collection of Samuelson's published articles in addition to a few of his monographs. In some cases, article folders include extensive correspondence between Samuelson and his editors and publishers. There is a complete list of Samuelson's publications available to researchers in the library, but not every publication listed is present in the collection. Located in this series is a copy of the thesis that Samuelson wrote while he was at Harvard, which in 1947 was published as the well-known Foundations of Economic Analysis. Also present in this series are the many columns and articles he wrote for Newsweek in the 1960s and 1970s.

Other aspects of Samuelson's career can be found in course files which form the Teaching Materials Series, most of which contain reading lists and syllabi, and in the Committees and Projects Series, which contains information on his many consultancy roles, grant-funded projects, and professional service. Examples include projects for the Radiation Laboratory and the Rand Corporation, and contributions to government agencies such as the U.S. War Production Board and the Federal Reserve Board, as well as academic organizations such as the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Science and the Econometric Society.

The smallest series of the collection, the Awards Series contains materials relating to Samuelson's Nobel Prize in Economics in 1970 and his Medal of Science award in 1996. Files contain congratulatory letters and telegrams, and his outgoing correspondence to subsequent Nobel Prize winners. In contrast to this small series, the large Speeches and Interviews Series houses paper drafts or transcripts of nearly all of Samuelson's public presentations, amounting to over 400 lectures, speeches, and interviews. Some of these can also be found on recorded media in the Audiovisual Series.

The Audiovisual Materials Series features 320 cassettes from the commercially produced "Economics Cassettes Series," a set of interviews with Milton Friedman and Paul Samuelson on economics issues of the times. There are also a few tapes and cassettes of lectures and speeches by Samuelson. Items related to the topics and events represented in this series are also found in the Teaching Materials, Speeches and Interviews, and Awards Series. There is a DVD recording of the 2010 MIT memorial service which provides many images of Samuelson taken throughout his life, filling in for the absence of photographs in the collection. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; listening or viewing copies may need to be made by staff for access. Please contact Research Services before coming to use this series.

Collection

Robert S. Smith papers, 1930 - 1969 11 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

Robert Sidney Smith (1904-1969) taught economics at Duke University for over 35 years. His research focused on Latin American and South American economic thought. The collection includes correspondence, reprints, manuscripts, notes, microfilms, and other published materials. Major topics include Latin American and South American economic thought and policy, the Dan River Textile Mills in Danville, Virginia, and the Department of Economics and Business Administration at Duke University. English, and Spanish or Castilian.

Collection includes correspondence, reprints, manuscripts, notes, microfilms, and other published materials related to Smith's professional career as an educator and economist. Much of the material is in Spanish, reflecting his activities and research interests in Latin American economic history and development, and the history of Hispanic economic thought. Other matters treated in the files concern the Dan River Textile Mills in Danville, Virginia, Smith's work as a government consultant, and as a teacher of economics in South America and Latin America., and affairs of the Department of Economics and Business Administration. There is some material related to the courses he taught, and to personal affairs and writings.

Collection

Roy Radner papers, 1951-2014 36 Linear Feet — 0.0028 Gigabytes

Roy Radner (1927- ) is an economic theorist and professor who has researched and taught at University of California at Berkeley, the Cowles Commission, AT&T Bell Lab, and New York University. His archival collection includes his published writings, drafts, collaborations, correspondence, and teaching materials spanning the length of his career.

The Roy Radner Papers contain 6 series. The series "Writings" (1951-2013) includes Radner's published and unpublished papers, with various materials related to them (e.g., correspondence with editors and colleagues, multiple drafts with hand-written notes, hand-written sheets of mathematical developments etc.). The series "Correspondence" (1954-2014) includes his correspondence sorted by individuals' names. Files include correspondence with and about, or only about, the individual named on a given file. There is also a set of personal files. Due to the large number of recommendation letters and other personnel-related content of the Correspondence series, this portion of the collection is restricted until 2050. The series "Teaching" (1967-2012) contains materials related to his teaching activity (e.g., syllabus, reading lists and packets, exercises with solutions). The bulk of it is largely from the Stern School (New York University) from the late 1990s to the early 2010s. The series "Research Activities" (1962-2014) includes materials about activities such as seminars, workshops, study groups and the like. Finally, the series "Writings by Others" (1954-2006) contains materials written by other researchers, with or (in most cases) without notes from Radner. There are no specific connections among the series to be noted, except the fact that, by virtue of their thematic organizations, one can find academic and administrative letters in all the series, i.e., not only in "Correspondence."

Collection contains electronic records that must be requested and accessed in our reading room. Contact Research Services with questions.