Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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William Volker Fund records, 1953-1961 1.8 Linear Feet — 25 Items

The William Volker Fund operated from 1932-1965 as a charitable foundation promoting free-market and liberatarian economics. Along with funding research, the Fund sponsored the work of Old Right economists, and gave liberatarian books to college libraries through the National Book Foundation. Accession (2009-0179) (25 items; 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1953-1961) includes reports and surveys commissioned by the Fund regarding education and health; sourcebooks on education resources and conferences; National Book Foundation files; and other miscellaneous materials, including a William Volker Fund office manual and board meeting reports.

Accession (2009-0179) (25 items; 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1953-1961) includes reports and surveys commissioned by the Fund regarding education and health; sourcebooks on education resources and conferences; National Book Foundation files; and other miscellaneous materials, including a William Volker Fund office manual and board meeting reports.

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E. Roy Weintraub papers, 1930-2019 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — 1.1 Gigabytes

E. Roy Weintraub (b.1943) is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Duke University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings.

The E. Roy Weintraub Papers document his career as a historian of economics and mathematics, and professor at Duke University. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the history of economics, role in the community of history of economics scholars, and as a faculty member and administrator at Duke.

The collection also documents his communications with prominent economists as research subjects such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, and Lionel McKenzie. Included in Weintraub's communications are exchanges with prominent figures in the history of economics and related communities of scholars such as Roger Backhouse, Bradley Bateman, Anthony Brewer, Arjo Klamer, Mary Morgan, Deirdre McCloskey, and Philip Mirowski.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Weintraub's roles at in the History of Economics Society, at Duke University, and as an editor of History of Political Economy.

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Anita Arrow Summers is an economist and Professor Emerita at the University of Pennsylvania. Summers also worked as Head of the Urban Section of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia's Research Department. This collection consists of select files from her professional activities and from her family.

The Anita Arrow Summers papers document her career as an economist. The collection provides a sample of her professional activities, particularly her research on urban economics, education and economics, and the local economy in Philadelphia.

The collection also documents Summers's familial ties to other prominent economists such as her husband Robert Summers, her brother Kenneth J. Arrow, and her brother-in-law (via Robert) Paul A. Samuelson.

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Oskar Morgenstern papers, 1866-1992 and undated 41.8 Linear Feet — 27,691 Items

Economist, university professor, and author in Austria and U.S., born Carl Friedrich Alfred Oskar Morgenstern in Germany. The papers of Oskar Morgenstern, who is associated with the Austrian School of Economics, span the years 1866-1992, although the bulk of the materials date from 1917 to 1977. They consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, printed material, audiovisual material, manuscript and printed writings and their supporting papers, and biographical and bibliographical information about his career and publications. The collection principally concerns Morgenstern's work as an economic theorist, university professor, author and lecturer, and consultant to business and government.

The papers of Oskar Morgenstern, who is associated with the Austrian school of economics, span the years 1866-1992, although the bulk of the materials date from 1917 to 1977. They consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, printed material, audiovisual material, manuscript and printed writings and their supporting papers, and biographical and bibliographical information about his career and publications. The collection principally concerns Morgenstern's work as an economic theorist, university professor, author and lecturer, and consultant to business and government.

The first two decades of Morgenstern's career as an economist, the 1920s and 1930s, were associated with the University of Vienna where he was educated and was a faculty member until his emigration to the United States in 1938. He published major books about economic forecasting (1928) and the limits of economics (1934) and numerous other writings in which the subjects of business cycles, prices, the depression of the 1930s, economic conditions in Europe and America, currency and exchange, and economic history and theory are prominent. Information about them is scattered throughout the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, and Subject Files Series. Morgenstern's interests and correspondents were international, although principally European and American. A considerable part of the correspondence and writings during these years, and all of the diaries, are written in German. English is also prominent, and other languages also occur.

Morgenstern's output of publications during the 1940s, his first decade at Princeton University, was less extensive than in the 1930s, but he and John von Neumann published their classic Theory of Games and Economic Behavior in 1944. As Princeton editor Sanford G. Thatcher wrote in 1987, in sheer intellectual influence, it probably has stimulated more creative thinking, in a wider variety of fields of scholarship, than any other single book Princeton University Press has published. Information about this book and subsequent international developments in game theory pervades the Correspondence, Subject Files, and Writings and Speeches Series until Morgenstern's death. The elaboration of game theory was not only theoretical but also practical, and Morgenstern's writings and projects illustrate its applications, especially in U.S. military and foreign policy during the Cold War.

The Writings and Speeches Series, including the diaries, and the Subject Files Series are extensive for the 1940s as they are for the later decades of Morgenstern's career. The Correspondence Series, however, is extensive only for the 1920s, 1930s, and 1970s. Part of his correspondence apparently did not survive. However, Morgenstern routinely placed letters and other material in his files for subjects and writings, and many letters are to be found there. There are a number of letters for some correspondents, but extensive correspondence with an individual is not characteristic of this collection. A person's letters may be filed in more than one chronological group of correspondence.

Morgenstern published prolifically during the 1950s to 1970s. His major books focused on accuracy in economics (1950), organization (1951), national defense (1958), international finance and business cycles (1959), the peaceful uses of underground nuclear explosions (1967), stock market prices (1970), political, economic, and military forecasting (1973), and expanding and contracting economies in various societies (1976). These books and numerous articles and reviews reveal his interest in economic theory, international economic problems, and the application of mathematics and economics to public policy problems. The Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, and Correspondence Series document many of his publications and such topics as the Cold War, nuclear issues, military and naval affairs (especially the U.S. Navy), defense, space, economic analysis, game theory, the stock market, business cycles, mathematics and economics, statistical validity, and his work with John von Neumann, Martin Shubik, Friedrich A. von Hayek, Gottfried Haberler, Antonio de Viti de Marco, Eveline Burns, Gerald L. Thompson, N. N. Vorob'ev, and others.

Morgenstern taught at Princeton until his retirement in 1970 when be began teaching at New York University, and both schools are represented, particularly in the Subject Files Series. These files and the Writings and Speeches Series document his relationship with public and private organizations, especially the Office of Naval Research, the Rand Corporation, various foundations and scholarly societies, and Mathematica, a consulting firm that did contract work for government and business. Morgenstern was co-founder of Mathematica. The Mathematica Series contains correspondence, memos, policy reports, project proposals, and research papers. The institutions that are often mentioned include NASA, Office of Naval Research, and Sandia Corporation. Topics, among others, relate to analysis of military conflicts, economics of the space program, management research, or peaceful use of nuclear energy. Some materials related to Mathematica Series are still scattered across the rest of the collection.

Morgenstern habitually incorporated into his files pertinent thoughts or information that might be useful for later consideration. Consequently, the Subject Files and Writings and Speeches Series often include letters, memoranda, lecture notes, writings by others, mathematics, printed material, and other Items. Thus, a file for a topic or publication in 1963 may contain relevant dated material from other years and decades.

The diaries, 1917-1977, are relatively complete, but Morgenstern did not write daily or every month. There are significant gaps: 1918-1920; Feb.-May 1938; March 1946-Jan. 1947; and Sept. 1951-Feb. 1952. Shorter gaps also occur in April-May 1924, Sept. 1925; June-July 1948; and April 1949. The diaries are in the Writings and Speeches Series.

Morgenstern's library of printed material was donated to New York University.

Addition (06-067) (2452 items, 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 1935-1976) contains primarily published works by Morgenstern and his major co-authors such as John von Neumann and Gerald L. Thompson in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and German arranged in alphabetical order. Important works contained in this series include typed manuscript portions of Theory of Games and Economic Behavior with annotations, draft chapters of the Question of National Defense, Long Term Planning with Models of Static and Dynamic Open Expanding Economies, the Mathematica Economic Analysis of the Space Shuttle System and some correspondence, as well as supporting documentation and statistics. There are also three audiotape reels with Morgenstern's lectures.

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Lawrence Klein papers, 1950s-2010 52.5 Linear Feet — 40,000 items

Nobel-prize winning economist and professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. Collection includes Klein's correspondence, writings and drafts, economic research and subject files, organizational papers, and dissertations from Klein's many students. Contains significant amount of material from Project LINK, particularly from the late 1960s. Audiovisual recordings of the first LINK conference in 1969 will require reformatting prior to use. Also includes files from Klein's presidency of the National Academy of Science, his professorship at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, and printouts from early economic computer programs and experiments.

The collection includes Klein's correspondence, writings and drafts, economic research and subject files, organizational papers, and dissertations from Klein's many students. It contains significant amount of material from Project LINK, particularly from the late 1960s. Audiovisual recordings of the first LINK conference in 1969 will require reformatting prior to use. Also included are files from Klein's presidency of the National Academy of Science, his professorship at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, and printouts from early economic computer programs and experiments.

The Dissertations series includes copies and drafts of dissertations and theses written by Klein's students and advisees during his tenure at the University of Pennsylvania. They are arranged in alphabetical order by the author's name.

The Subjects, Organizations, and Research series includes subject files and materials on various publications, research topics, projects, and organizations with which Klein worked. This series includes many materials from his career at the University of Pennsylvania, including teaching materials and committee information, as well as his presidency of the National Academy of Sciences. It has been arranged alphabetically by folder title.

The Project LINK series contains records related to that project, for which Klein served as principal investigator along with Bert Hickman, Rudolf Rhomberg, and Aaron Gordon. Included are materials from various meetings, research materials, and reports.

The Computer Printouts series contains computer printouts from an unknown project, possibly Project LINK, dating from the early 1980s.

The Correspondence series contains letters, memos, and faxes received or written by Klein. Much of the correspondence was exchanged with colleagues in the field of economics, and reflects collaborative research endeavors. Arranged loosely by correspondent within each year. Not every year has incoming correspondence.

Writings by Klein includes papers and speeches written by Lawrence Klein for journals, newspapers, editorials, and congressional testimony.

Writings by Others includes non-dissertation writings on economics collected by Klein for his own research or interest.

Audiovisual Materials contains audio recordings of the first worldwide Project LINK conference in 1969. This material will need to be reformatted prior to use.

There is also a small amount of Unsorted Miscellaneous material.

In addition, a small amount of electronic media has been removed from the collection and transferred to Duke's server. Please contact Research Services for access to this material.

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History of Political Economy records, 1967-2011 128.9 Linear Feet — 16,000 Items

Collection (1998-0229, 1998-0450, 1998-0455, 1999-0318, 1999-0365, 2000-0152, 2000-0184) (11950 items, 109.6 lin. ft.; dated 1967-1999) contains the files of published and unpublished manuscripts on the history of economics, arranged for the most part in chronological groupings and then alphabetically by author, along with referees' comments and editors' correspondence.

The addition (2001-0018) (100 items, 0.3 lin. ft.; dated 1995-1998) contains 23 manuscripts accepted for publication and their associated correspondence.

The addition (2001-119) (450 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2000) comprises files of published and rejected manuscripts. There is also information pertaining to the founding of the journal.

The addition (2001-0180) (200 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2001) contains rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2001-0194) (150 items, 1.0 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2001) contains 40 manuscripts accepted for publication and their associated correspondence. Five manuscripts included machine-readable records.

The addition (2001-0261) (525 items, 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 1994-1999) contains correspondence related to published and unpublished articles, primarily for volume 32. Includes 1 electronic document received on one floppy disk.

The addition (2002-0172) (1500 items, 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2002) comprises correspondence related to articles published in volumes 31.4, 33.2, and 34.2 as well as rejected articles. There are also folders related to HOPE conferences (1997-1999).

The addition (2003-0140) (130 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2003) includes published manuscripts for the Spring and Fall 2003 issues, as well as rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2003-0186) (375 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2003) consists of records for issues 32.1, 32.2, 34.1, 34.3, 34.4, and 35.1, including published and rejected manuscripts, and correspondence.

The addition (2004-0100) (250 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2004) consists of files containing rejected manuscripts, primarily from 2002-2003, along with related correspondence and readers' reports.

The addition (2006-0059) (1875 items; 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains files of unpublished and rejected manuscripts with related correspondence and peer reviews; and files of accepted manuscripts for issues 36.2, 36.3, 36.4, 37.2, and 37.4.

The addition (2007-0163) (950 items; 1.4 lin. ft.; dated 2003-2006) contains files of articles submitted for publication and correspondence, peer reviews, and revisions related to these articles. Also included are submissions that were rejected from publication.

The addition (2007-0164) (450 items; 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 2005-2006) includes manuscripts, revisions, and correspondence for articles published in issues 39.4 and 40.1; and rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2008-0265) (750 items; 1 lin. ft.; dated 2008) includes correspondence, manuscripts, and revisions for articles published in issues 40.1 and 40.2; also rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2008-0315) (900 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2008) includes rejected manuscripts and accepted articles for issues 41.1 and 41.2.

The addition (2009-0167) (800 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2009) includes rejected manuscripts and accepted articles for issues 41.3 and 41.4.

The addition (2010-0085) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2010) includes accepted and rejected manuscripts from issues 42.3.

The addition (2010-0124) (100 items; 0.2 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2010) includes correspondence between HOPE editors and authors regarding accepted articles for issue 42.4

The addition (2011-1007) (200 items; 0.5 lin. ft.; dated 2011-2012) includes accepted articles and papers for issues 43.3, 43.4, and 44.1.

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Randall Hinshaw papers, 1930-1995 13.5 Linear Feet — 10,125 Items

Randall Hinshaw was a professor in economics at the Claremont Graduate School, where he specialized in monetary theory. He founded the Claremont-Bologna Monetary Conference Series. Collection includes correspondence, both personal and economics-related; monetary conference files from the 1960s-1990s; audio and video cassettes and reels of conference talks and proceedings; economics articles and reprints; and some of Hinshaw's early schoolwork and papers from the 1930s-1940s.

Although this collection has not been processed, it consists of several major parts: Hinshaw's early schoolwork, including his BA diploma and his MA thesis from Occidental College; drafts of his books; articles, reprints, and papers from Hinshaw and numerous other economists, dating from the 1940s-1990s; conference materials and correspondence from 1968-1995; correspondence files from 1957-1993, including Hinshaw's exchanges with other leading economists; audiotapes, audioreels, and videotapes of economic conference proceedings and speeches; and other miscellaneous or loose material. Most materials have been refoldered for preservation.

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Jim Friedman papers, 1962-1965 1.5 Linear Feet — 9 Items

Economist and Kenan Professor of Economics emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Accession (2010-0001) (9 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1962-1965) consists of research and experiment notes relating to 1960s economics experiments in games and game theory. Also includes Friedman's dissertation, The Theory of Oligopoly.

Accession (2010-0001) includes research notes and results from game theory experiments conducted by Friedman in the 1960s. These are held in hardback folders and sorted by date, beginning with a games experiment in 1962 and ending in 1965. His dissertation, "Theory of Oligopoly," is also included. Friedman has also provided his C.V. with some parts circled, reflecting which articles resulted from the experiments present in the collection.

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Economics author and professor at the University of Florida. Collection contains materials related to economist Milton Friedman. Included are lecture notes, notes on Free to Chose, photographs, and eight audiocassettes with transcriptions of discussions interviews conducted by Fraser.

Collection contains materials related to economist Milton Friedman. Included are lecture notes, notes on Free to Chose, photographs, and eight audiocassettes with transcriptions of discussions interviews conducted by Fraser.

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Bruno Foa papers, 1927-2005 3.5 Linear Feet — 2500 Items

Italian-born economist, lawyer, consultant, and professor. Collection contains Foa’s published and unpublished writings; files and correspondence from positions he held including his term as a fellow at Princeton University (1940-1942), as Director of the Bureau of Latin American Research (1941-1943), on the Federal Reserve Board, as a consultant for other economics projects, and as professor and guest lecturer at several Universities; a memoir by Foa; his biography of the Foa family; and personal correspondence among his family members, travel documents, and memos about the destination during trips to Italy, Jerusalem, Spain, South America and Somalia.

Collection contains Foa’s published and unpublished writings; files and correspondence from positions he held including his term as a fellow at Princeton University (1940-1942), as Director of the Bureau of Latin American Research (1941-1943), on the Federal Reserve Board, as a consultant for other economics projects, and as professor and guest lecturer at several Universities; a memoir by Foa; his biography of the Foa family; and personal correspondence among his family members, travel documents, and memos about the destination during trips to Italy, Jerusalem, Spain, South America and Somalia.