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Axel Leijonhufvud papers, 1953-1980 and undated 4.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 3,000 Items

Swedish economist, currently professor emeritus at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and professor at the University of Trento, Italy. The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud date from 1953-1980 and consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory, especially as it pertains to finance; instability and disequilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general. A few items are in Swedish.

The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory; instability and (dis)equilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general.

The Correspondence Series includes communications from notable individuals such as Armen Alchian, Robert W. Clower (co-author), Robert Dorfman, Alan G. Gowman, Bert Hoselitz, Erik Lundberg, Gunnar Myrdal, and Joan Robinson. A few items are in Swedish. The Writings and Research Series includes Leijonhufvud's master's thesis and notes, doctoral dissertation and related research, and a variety of graduate papers in addition to drafts and published pieces; there are six subseries - Axel Leijonhufvud Writings, Class Lecture Notes, Dissertation, Graduate Work, Research and Notes, and Writings by Others. Within the latter there is a sizeable amount of unpublished and later-published manuscripts by Joan Robinson, fellow economist and close colleague.

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Byrd L. Jones was a professor in the School of Education at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Collection comprises Byrd's correspondence with the government economist concerning his publications on the New Deal era. Includes Currie's comments on Byrd's manuscripts.

Collection comprises Byrd's correspondence with the government economist concerning his publications on the New Deal era. Includes Currie's comments on Byrd's manuscripts.

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Calvin Bryce Hoover papers, 1922-1970 41.5 Linear Feet — 40,000 Items

Calvin Bryce Hoover (1897-1974) was an economist, a scholar, and a leader in public service. A member of the Duke faculty from 1925 until his retirement in 1966, Hoover served as chairman of the Department of Economics from 1937-1957, and Dean of the Graduate School from 1938-1948. Hoover is widely accepted as the founder of the field of comparative economics. Materials include correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials. Major subjects of the collection are the economic conditions in the Soviet Union, Germany, and the United States in the 20th century; the administration of an academic department during wartime; Soviet economic policy; Soviet politics and government; the formation of New Deal agricultural policies in the South; and the Office of Strategic Services. English, German, and Russian.

The Calvin Bryce Hoover papers span the years 1922-1970, with the bulk falling between 1929 and 1968. The collection is arranged into nine series: Correspondence; Writings; Academic Materials; Professional Associations; Government Service; Subject Files; Audio-Visual Material; Personal; and Printed Material. The collection includes correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials.

The first series, Correspondence, contains mostly academic or professional correspondence. The correspondence is arranged alphabetically, except for Box 27 which contains correspondence from or about the National Planning Association. It is important to note that Hoover tended to file his correspondence by subject, rather than by correspondent. As such, a file labeled "John Doe" may not necessarily contain correspondence written by "John Doe," but may include correspondence about "John Doe."

The second series, Writings, includes copies of Hoover's publications, unpublished material, addresses, drafts, notes, publication agreements, and correspondence. The third series, Academic Material, includes departmental files, course files, and other materials associated largely with Hoover's work at Duke University. The series includes material about the Economics Dept., professors, courses taught by Hoover, correspondence, theses, and other files. The fourth series, Professional Associations, includes files on the American Economic Association, the Southern Economic Association, and the Ford Foundation.

The fifth series, Government Service, includes general subject files, files on war agencies, the Committee for Economic Development, and the Council on Foreign Relations, the Economic Cooperation Administration, and correspondence. The sixth series, Subject Files, includes general topical files. The seventh series, Audio-Visual Material, includes photographs and audio reels. The eighth series, Personal, includes Hoover's personal school papers, souvenirs, and personal papers belonging to Hoover's wife, Faith.

The ninth series, Printed Material, includes publications not authored by Hoover. There are a fair number of these in German and Russian.

This collection contains materials that would lend itself to many areas of research interests. Of note is the material pertaining to the Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) which offers a unique picture of the work of the O.S.S. in Scandinavia, the Chief of Mission in Stockholm, Hoover's administrative style and means of controlling this operation, his philosophy of intelligence, and many day to day details of the profession of espionage.

Other topics of interest include the administration of an academic department during wartime, Soviet economic data and collection techniques of the 1930s, the formation of New Deal agricultural policies, and the development of the American foreign aid program.

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Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Sylvia Lane was an economist who served on the Board of Directors of Consumers Union 1975-1977. The Sylvia Lane papers consist primarily of drafts, notes, reprints and published reports of Lane's advocacy and professional research writings. Subjects include consumer education, credit and credit discrimination, economic development, food distribution, health and medical care costs, housing and real estate, low-income communities and individuals, and sales and other taxes. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Sylvia Lane papers consist primarily of drafts, notes, reprints and published reports of Lane's advocacy and professional research writings. Subjects include consumer education, credit and credit discrimination, economic development, food distribution, health and medical care costs, housing and real estate, low-income communities and individuals, and sales and other taxes.

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E. Roy Weintraub papers, 1930-2019 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — 1.1 Gigabytes

E. Roy Weintraub (b.1943) is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Duke University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings.

The E. Roy Weintraub Papers document his career as a historian of economics and mathematics, and professor at Duke University. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the history of economics, role in the community of history of economics scholars, and as a faculty member and administrator at Duke.

The collection also documents his communications with prominent economists as research subjects such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, and Lionel McKenzie. Included in Weintraub's communications are exchanges with prominent figures in the history of economics and related communities of scholars such as Roger Backhouse, Bradley Bateman, Anthony Brewer, Arjo Klamer, Mary Morgan, Deirdre McCloskey, and Philip Mirowski.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Weintraub's roles at in the History of Economics Society, at Duke University, and as an editor of History of Political Economy.

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History of Political Economy records, 1967-2011 128.9 Linear Feet — 16,000 Items

Collection (1998-0229, 1998-0450, 1998-0455, 1999-0318, 1999-0365, 2000-0152, 2000-0184) (11950 items, 109.6 lin. ft.; dated 1967-1999) contains the files of published and unpublished manuscripts on the history of economics, arranged for the most part in chronological groupings and then alphabetically by author, along with referees' comments and editors' correspondence.

The addition (2001-0018) (100 items, 0.3 lin. ft.; dated 1995-1998) contains 23 manuscripts accepted for publication and their associated correspondence.

The addition (2001-119) (450 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2000) comprises files of published and rejected manuscripts. There is also information pertaining to the founding of the journal.

The addition (2001-0180) (200 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2001) contains rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2001-0194) (150 items, 1.0 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2001) contains 40 manuscripts accepted for publication and their associated correspondence. Five manuscripts included machine-readable records.

The addition (2001-0261) (525 items, 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 1994-1999) contains correspondence related to published and unpublished articles, primarily for volume 32. Includes 1 electronic document received on one floppy disk.

The addition (2002-0172) (1500 items, 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2002) comprises correspondence related to articles published in volumes 31.4, 33.2, and 34.2 as well as rejected articles. There are also folders related to HOPE conferences (1997-1999).

The addition (2003-0140) (130 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2003) includes published manuscripts for the Spring and Fall 2003 issues, as well as rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2003-0186) (375 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2003) consists of records for issues 32.1, 32.2, 34.1, 34.3, 34.4, and 35.1, including published and rejected manuscripts, and correspondence.

The addition (2004-0100) (250 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2004) consists of files containing rejected manuscripts, primarily from 2002-2003, along with related correspondence and readers' reports.

The addition (2006-0059) (1875 items; 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains files of unpublished and rejected manuscripts with related correspondence and peer reviews; and files of accepted manuscripts for issues 36.2, 36.3, 36.4, 37.2, and 37.4.

The addition (2007-0163) (950 items; 1.4 lin. ft.; dated 2003-2006) contains files of articles submitted for publication and correspondence, peer reviews, and revisions related to these articles. Also included are submissions that were rejected from publication.

The addition (2007-0164) (450 items; 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 2005-2006) includes manuscripts, revisions, and correspondence for articles published in issues 39.4 and 40.1; and rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2008-0265) (750 items; 1 lin. ft.; dated 2008) includes correspondence, manuscripts, and revisions for articles published in issues 40.1 and 40.2; also rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2008-0315) (900 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2008) includes rejected manuscripts and accepted articles for issues 41.1 and 41.2.

The addition (2009-0167) (800 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2009) includes rejected manuscripts and accepted articles for issues 41.3 and 41.4.

The addition (2010-0085) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2010) includes accepted and rejected manuscripts from issues 42.3.

The addition (2010-0124) (100 items; 0.2 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2010) includes correspondence between HOPE editors and authors regarding accepted articles for issue 42.4

The addition (2011-1007) (200 items; 0.5 lin. ft.; dated 2011-2012) includes accepted articles and papers for issues 43.3, 43.4, and 44.1.

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Karl Menger papers, 1872-2000 49 Linear Feet — 29,500 items

Collection includes correspondence, notebooks, research and teaching notes, drafts of unpublished and published works, teaching materials, student theses, printed materials, and a few photographs. Mathematical subjects include curves theory, algebra, geometry, and the philosophy of mathematics. Many letters are from notable scientists; those written to Menger during World War II often comment on the hardships of colleagues still in Europe. Includes biographical materials relating to Karl Menger and to his father, the Austrian economist Carl Menger, and materials related to the history of the Vienna Circle (1920s-1930s), a group of scholars concerned with philosophy and science. Notebooks relate to Menger's early work as a student, and later notes on mathematical theory. Printed items include many European and American scientific reprints, textbooks, study manuals, and school publications.

Collection includes correspondence, notebooks, research and teaching notes, drafts of unpublished and published works, teaching materials, student theses, printed materials, and a few photographs. Mathematical subjects include curves theory, algebra, geometry, and the philosophy of mathematics. Many letters are from notable scientists; those written to Menger during World War II often comment on the hardships of colleagues still in Europe. Includes biographical materials relating to Karl Menger and to his father, the Austrian economist Carl Menger, and materials related to the history of the Vienna Circle (1920s-1930s), a group of scholars concerned with philosophy and science. Notebooks relate to Menger's early work as a student, and later notes on mathematical theory. Printed items include many European and American scientific reprints, textbooks, study manuals, and school publications.

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Lauchlin Bernard Currie papers, 1931-1994 and undated 60.35 Linear Feet — 31,370 Items

English.

The Lauchlin Bernard Currie Papers, 1930-1997, serve to document the life, career, and theories of the economist. The collection chiefly consists of correspondence, published, materials, clippings, and subject files, and is primarily arranged chronologically and thematically. The bulk of the materials focus on Currie's analysis of macroeconomic policy during the New Deal, and growth, housing, and export policies for developing countries, especially Colombia. There is also material on China and Currie's mentor at Harvard Allyn Young

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Collection consists of article offprints and monographs by and about economist Maurice Allais. It includes a range of published scholarship written by Allais, along with a small amout of lecture notes and reference articles about his life and work.

Collection contains article offprints and monographs by and about economist Maurice Allais. Materials are listed alphabetically within 3 subseries: Articles by Allais, Articles about Allais, and Lectures by Allais. The first two subseries include publications and clippings from assorted journals, newspapers, and other periodicals. The Lectures subseries contains drafts from Allais's visit to the Thomas Jefferson Center for Studies in Political Economy in 1959.

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Thomas Mayer was an American economist (1927-2015) known for his work in economic methodology and monetary policy. His papers include published works and drafts of his writings and research and a small amount of correspondence between him and other economists. A portion of this collection is born-digital material, which is not yet available for research.

The papers held in this collection consist largely of Mayer's writings, in both final and draft form, which span his professional career from the 1950s until the 2010s. There is a small amount of printed correspondence, including notable economists Milton Friedman, Roger Backhouse, and others. The bulk of the collection consists of born-digital materials, which contain both electronic drafts and email correspondence. As of January 2017, this material is not yet available for research. Contact Research Services with questions about accessing that portion of the collection.