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Alvin Roth papers, 1960s-2000 20.1 Linear Feet — 15075 Items

Roth is the George Gund Professor of Economics and Business Administration at Harvard University. His research interests include game theory, experimental economics, and market design. He won the Nobel Prize in 2012. Collection includes correspondence files, writings and research, writings by other economists, and some teaching material.

The collection offers a wealth of information from Roth's early career at the University of Pittsburgh, including his research and correspondence from that period, as well as drafts of some of his well-cited articles and writings. Approximately one-half of the material lies in the Correspondence and Working Papers series. This portion of the collection, arranged alphabetically by correspondent, includes professional correspondence as well as many drafts of scholarly articles. This arrangement replicates Roth's original filing system, which offers insight into his correspondence style and methodology for economics collaboration. Notable correspondents include Roy Weintraub, Robert Aumann, Ido Erev, Uriel Rothblum, and many more. Also included are various subject files, including Winner's Curse, Matching, and Learning.

Another notable component of the collection is Roth's Writings and Research, which includes both working drafts of Roth's own as well as data printouts and other components of his work in game theory and its real-world applications. These files have been grouped by article and are loosely arranged by date. Each article's co-writers or collaborators are noted if known.

The Writings by Others series has some overlap with the Correspondence and Working Drafts series, but for the most part the former includes only the article from Roth's fellow economists, without the collaborative or feedback aspect present in the latter series.

Roth's Teaching and Coursework series includes lecture notes as well as tools such as transparencies used during his economics lectures. Roth's own coursework at Stanford is also present, including notes, exams, syllabi, and lectures on topics such as microeconomics, competitive strategies, game theory, and choice theory.

Finally, the Grant Materials series is arranged by grant application, with each file including application materials, correspondence, reports, and finances relating to the grant.

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Don Patinkin papers, 1870-1995 120 Linear Feet — 90,000 Items

Correspondence, research, publishing, teaching, and subject files documenting the career of Don Patinkin at the University of Chicago, the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and many other institutions. Extensive correspondence files include the names of many notable economists. Much of Patinkin's work relates to the career and theories of John Maynard Keynes; other areas of study include theories of money and value; interest; banking; macroeconomics; equilibrium theories; and unemployment. Many files contain information on Patinkin's considerable published output. Other files document his activities on behalf of many organizations such as the Bank of Israel, the Econometric Society, and the Maurice Falk Institute for Economic Research in Israel. Includes Patinkin's own early student notebooks while studying at the University of Chicago in the 1940's. There are a few photographs of Patinkin. Some materials are in Hebrew, and include documents relating to Patinkin's involvement in Israeli politics and economic development, as well as course materials from classes taught by Patinkin at Hebrew University.

The bulk of the professional papers of Don Patinkin date from the years he spent as an undergraduate and graduate student at the University of Chicago, beginning in 1942 and spanning his entire career, ending with his death in August, 1995. These are the dates of Patinkin's production or acquisition of the papers in the collection, but many of the documents in the collection are research materials that were produced earlier by others; these date chiefly from the 1930s. Materials represented include correspondence, book manuscripts and other manuscript drafts; course materials, including lectures, seminar notes, syllabi, student papers, and exams; student notebooks; committee and other organizational files; printed materials such as articles; book contracts; academic files, including recommendations and reports; some financial and legal files; invitations; clippings; and a few photographs.

The main subjects of interest are related chiefly to Keynesian economics, but also to the neoclassical theory of value, equilibrium economics, theories of unemployment, and general monetary economics. Other subjects include the teaching of economics; the histories of Chicago University's School of Economics and Hebrew University in Jerusalem; the Israeli economy; Israeli agriculture; and social conditions in Israel and adjacent areas. Many of these subjects are discussed in Patinkin's major publications, whose drafts can also be found in the collection: these titles include Money, Interest, and Prices: An Integration of Monetary and Value Theory; Keynes' Monetary Thought: A Study of Its Development; Anticipations of the General Theory and Other Essays on Keynes; Essays on and in the Chicago Tradition; and The Israel Economy: The First Decade.

Correspondents and chief protagonists during Patinkin's long career represent almost every major economist of the twentieth century, but the most prominent include Kenneth Arrow, Milton Friedman, Roy Harrod, John Hicks, Frank Knight, Harry Johnson, Simon Kuznets, Franco Modigliani, Dennis Robertson, Paul Samuelson, James Tobin, and Jacob Viner; Duke University faculty are represented by Craufurd Goodwin, Neil DeMarchi, and Roy Weintraub.

The papers are currently organized in series corresponding, for the most part, to the different yet interrelated strains of literature to which Patinkin contributed over his life. The series are: University of Chicago School of Economics, General Monetary Theory, Keynes and the History of Monetary Theory, Correspondence, Israel and Hebrew Materials, and Miscellaneous. (Of course, in many cases Patinkin's work crosses the boundaries within this taxonomy.)

Within each of the first three series the papers are further organized in subseries: Raw Materials, Course Materials, and Manuscripts and Notes. In general, the Raw Materials Subseries includes photocopied manuscripts of other economists, raw data, and other resources which Patinkin used in his research. (The term "raw materials" was the name he invented for such research materials.) The Course Materials Subseries includes syllabi, lecture notes, and photocopied readings which Patinkin used in his courses. The Manuscripts and Notes Subseries includes reprints and various stages of drafts of the many articles (and books) Patinkin wrote, and typewritten or handwritten notes he made in the course of his research.

The largest series of the collection is the Correspondence Series, which consists of forty-two boxes of letters between Patinkin and his professional colleagues, as well as book publishers and conference organizers, from the 1930s through 1995. Patinkin was a prolific correspondent, and consequently this series is a rich mine of written exchanges between Patinkin and most of the outstanding figures in twentieth century economics. The letters in this series will be useful to researchers in a very broad domain of interests. They can be used to document the cross-currents of thought communicated between Patinkin and other economists, or they could be used in research which is in almost every respect unrelated to Patinkin. For example, one paper has already made use of the lengthy and somewhat contentious correspondence between Patinkin and a little-known mathematician as evidence of that man's views in quite another dispute with Kenneth Arrow and Nicolas Georgescu-Roegen over the role of mathematics in economic modelling. It should be noted that clippings, curriculum vitae and other personal data, and photographs can also be found in this series.

The General Monetary Series contains materials related to the "neoclassical synthesis," the integration of Keynesian macroeconomics and the neoclassical theory of value pioneered by W. S. Jevons, Carl Menger, and Leon Walras, and developed by Alfred Marshall and A. C. Pigou. Patinkin is most widely known among economists for his contributions to this field. The first major work in the neoclassical synthesis was John Hicks's "Mr. Keynes and the Classics" (Econometrica, 1937), which framed Keynes's General Theory as a static system of equations and represented involuntary unemployment as a solution to the system such that the labor market does not clear. Patinkin's contribution to the neoclassical synthesis began in 1947 with his University of Chicago PhD thesis "On the Consistency of Economic Models: A Theory of Involuntary Unemployment," and reached its pinnacle with his 1956 book, Money, Interest, and Prices (MIP). (The book's subtitle, An Integration of Monetary and Value Theory, is more descriptive of its contents).

A second edition of MIP was published in 1965, and an abridged version of the second edition, with a lengthy new introduction, was published in 1989. Materials related to the contents of MIP are found in the General Monetary Theory Series. They consist of -- among many other items -- drafts of both editions of the MIP (in Manuscripts and Notes), coursepacks from Patinkin's Monetary Economics Seminar at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and elsewhere (in Course Materials), and a large number of photocopied articles, representing major innovations in monetary and macro-economics from the mid-1960s through the late '80s, which Patinkin used in writing his introduction to the abridged second edition of MIP.

In MIP Patinkin emphasized the Walrasian (general equilibrium) aspect of the neoclassical theory of value, and introduced real money balances as another one of the many goods from which consumers derive utility. The major results of this approach were a derivation of the "equation of exchange", MV=PT, from microfoundations; and the dismissal of Hicks's favored cause of involuntary unemployment in his static system: the "liquidity trap" which occurs when agents are unwilling to substitute bonds for money below a certain interest rate. With regard to the latter result, Patinkin was thought by some to be undermining the Keynesian revolution. Patinkin's own view, to the contrary, was that he was contributing to that revolution by making the argument of the source of involuntary unemployment more sophisticated. Having done away with Hicks's "liquidity trap" explanation of unemployment, Patinkin indeed could no longer find any satisfying explanation of unemployment within the solution to the static system of equations. Instead, Patinkin thought of unemployment as a phenomenon occurring during the economy's dynamic adjustment towards the equilibrium represented by the solution to the static system. In other words, Patinkin re-framed Hicks's model of Keynesian "equilibrium unemployment" as a model of "disequilibrium unemployment."

Patinkin was careful to place his work in MIP in the context of the debates in monetary and macro-economics which preceded it and helped motivate it; this required extensive research of the work of Walras, Keynes, and many other figures in the history of economics. In fact Hicks, who reviewed MIP for the Economic Journal, claimed Patinkin's "detailed examination of Walras is one of the most impressive parts of Patinkin's book." Patinkin's work in the history of economics went far beyond a few chapters in MIP, though. In 1976 the University of Chicago Press published his book Keynes' Monetary Thought: A Study of Its Development. A number of his journal articles on Keynes and possible precursors are collected in Anticipations of the General Theory? And Other Essays on Keynes (Duke University Press, 1982). In addition, Patinkin was on the advisory board of History of Political Economy and was a frequent contributor to, and referee for, that journal.

These historical interests are the basis of the Keynes and the History of Monetary Theory Series. Among the Manuscripts and Notes Subseries can be found early drafts of Anticipations, and the entries for "J. M. Keynes" and "Walras' Law" which he was solicited to write for the New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics. Course Materials Subseries includes coursepacks for the History of Monetary Theory Seminar which Patinkin taught at the Hebrew University, and which he viewed as essential for students in understanding the Monetary Economics Seminar. Among the Raw Materials are photocopied lecture notes, from a few different sources, on courses offered by Keynes and others at Cambridge in the early 1930's. Also, within the Correspondence Series can be found numerous referee's reports Patinkin addressed to Craufurd Goodwin, editor of History of Political Economy. His reports tend to be detailed and meticulous -- and often quite sharp.

Patinkin also found subjects closer to home which stimulated his historical interests, and materials related to these areas of interest can be found in the University of Chicago School of Economics Series. Among his lecturers -- and greatest influences -- when he was a student at Chicago were Frank Knight and Jacob Viner, and, to a lesser extent, Lloyd Mints and Henry C. Simons. Knight and Viner encouraged historical scholarly work very early in Patinkin's formation as an economist, and they were figures of such stature that it should not be surprising that Patinkin was later to turn his historical focus towards them and the early "Chicago School" which they, together with Mints and Simons, represented.

In 1981 Duke University Press published a collection of Patinkin's essays entitled Essays On and In the Chicago Tradition. As the title suggests, the book is a mix of articles representing a "Chicago approach" to economic questions (for example Patinkin's "Multiple-Plant Firms, Cartels, and Imperfect Competition," written while still a graduate student at Chicago and published in 1947), and articles about the Chicago approach and the men who embodied it (for example "Frank Knight as Teacher" (1973) and "The Chicago Tradition, the Quantity Theory, and Friedman" (1969).

The research Patinkin conducted in writing these and other articles in the same vein is the basis of the University of Chicago School of Economics Series. Among the Raw Materials are drafts of Patinkin's dissertation, lists of other dissertations in monetary economics written at the University of Chicago in the 1930's and '40's (including the one written by Patinkin's friend, and now Professor Emeritus at Duke, Martin Bronfenbrenner), and numerous reprints of articles by Frank Knight. The Manuscripts and Notes Subseries includes a number of slides Patinkin used in presentations of his paper "In Search of the 'Wheel of Wealth': On the Origins of Frank Knight's Circular-Flow Diagram" which was published in 1973 and later included in Essays On and In the Chicago Tradition. The slides, which present graphically early conceptions by different economists of the "circular flow" diagram now common in undergraduate macroeconomics texts, include the amusing 1887 diagram by Fleeming Jenkin which looks like five stick-figures skipping rope. Finally, the Course Materials Subseries is comprised entirely of one box of notebooks Patinkin kept from his undergraduate and graduate courses at Chicago.

Aside from Patinkin's interests in the history of economics, but consistent with his broader interest in macroeconomics, Patinkin followed the development of the Israeli economy and wrote occasionally on economic conditions in Israel; he was frequently called upon to serve on committees advising the Israeli government. This work is the basis of the Israel and Hebrew Materials Series. Most of the papers in this series are in Hebrew, though Patinkin provided English-language translations of most titles. Correspondence can also be found in this series. Other materials referring to his activities in Israel can be found in the Correspondence Series in his communications with other colleagues and friends.

His work in this area was no doubt motivated by the same attachment to Zionism and Israel that led him to begin seeking an academic position at the Hebrew University only a few months after he completed his preliminary exams for the Ph.D. at Chicago, and which was also represented by his first published article: "Mercantilism and the Readmission of the Jews to England" (Jewish Social Studies 8, 1946: 161-78). Patinkin's first idea for a Ph.D. thesis, in fact, was "The International Economic Position of Palestine." Although he abandoned the project due to lack of data, he continued to think along those lines -- particularly after finally accepting a position at the Hebrew University and arriving in Jerusalem in 1949. In 1959 the Maurice Falk Institute for Economic Research in Israel published his book The Israel Economy: The First Decade; and although he published no books on the topic afterward, he continued to write about it throughout his life.

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Economist and faculty member of Washington University in Saint Louis, Mo., and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1993. The papers of Douglass C. North date from 1942-2012 and consist chiefly of professional correspondence written and received by North, writings by North and other colleagues (the largest group), and files on conferences attended by North; there are also some teaching materials. The collection documents North's career as an economist and professor at Berkeley, University of Washington, Rice University, and Washington University (Missouri), and reflects his interests in economics, the economic history of the western world, transaction costs, economic development, institutional change, and industrialization and technology. Among the correspondents are many noted economists, including Yoram Barzel, Robert Bates, Reuven Brenner, Robert Clower, R. H. Coase, Robert Fogel, Robert Haveman, Robert Keohane, Simon Kuznets, Deirdre N. McCloskey, Elinor Ostrom, Vernon Smith, T. N. Srinivasan, John J. Wallis, and Barry R. Weingast.

The papers of university professor and Nobel Prize-winning economist Douglass C. North span the dates 1942-2012, with most of the papers being dated between 1970 and 2012. They consist chiefly of professional correspondence written and received by North, writings by North and other colleagues, and files on conferences attended by North. There are also materials relating to courses he taught. The collection documents North's career as an economist and professor at Berkeley, University of Washington, Rice University, and Washington University (Missouri), and reflects his interests in economics, the economic history of the western world, transaction costs, economic development, institutional change, and industrialization and technology. More specifically, the papers document his long-standing interest in explaining institutional change and political economies without relying exclusively on neo-classical economic theories. His political economy draw him closer to approaches of classical political economy.

Among the correspondents are many noted economists, including Yoram Barzel, Robert Bates, Reuven Brenner, Robert Clower, R.H. Coase, Robert Fogel, Robert Haveman, Robert Keohane, Simon Kuznets, Deirdre N. McCloskey, Emily Chamlee-Wright, Elinor Ostrom, Vernon Smith, T.N. Srinivasan, John J. Wallis and Barry R. Weingast. Some of these correspondents are also represented in the Writings Series of this collection, a large group which contains drafts, notes, and reprints of writings by North as well as writings by his colleagues.

North's secretary Fannie Batt is an important factor for a proper understanding of the nature of this collection. After receiving the Nobel Prize in 1993, North's correspondence expanded substantially. Fannie Batt, his secretary at the Washington University in St. Louis, was tasked to take care of the correspondence for North. Her role impacted the subsequent arrangement of the collection. Materials are often Fannie Batt's printouts of correspondence for North. Most of the correspondence since the 1990s is carried through Fannie Batt's email address. Also, North's own responses to emails are not as frequent in the collection as one would expect. Existing responses were often dictated by North and typed by Fannie Batt.

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Duncan Foley papers, 1965-2001 16.5 Linear Feet — 12375 Items

Economist and professor at the New School for Social Research. Collection contains writings and research, correspondence, name files, teaching and academic materials, and some personal and creative work by Foley. Common subjects include Marxism and monetary theory, statistical methodology, and political economy. This material may include restricted items.
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Earl J. Hamilton papers, 1350-1995 43.5 Linear Feet — 32,625 Items

Collection spans the years 1350 to 1995, and contains Earl J. Hamilton's research notes and other materials dating chiefly from the 1930s to the 1970s. Hamilton was a pioneer in the field of quantitative economic history during a career that spanned fifty years. Together with his wife, Gladys Dallas Hamilton, he conducted important research during the 1930s and 1940s on the history of the South American and Spanish economies; the history of American, Spanish, and French banking; the history of John Law and the "Mississippi Bubble" and its effect on European economies; and prices and wages in medieval Spain.

The Earl J. Hamilton Papers span the years from 1350 to 1995, with Hamilton's research notes and other materials dating chiefly from the 1930s to the 1970s. (Note: Early dates reflect original dates of primary sources rather than the dates on which the photocopies of these sources were created.) Hamilton was a pioneer in the field of quantitative economic history during a career that spanned fifty years. Together with his wife, Gladys Dallas Hamilton, he conducted important research during the 1930s and 1940s on the history of the South American and Spanish economies; the history of American, Spanish, and French banking; the history of John Law and the "Mississippi Bubble" and its effect on European economies; and prices and wages in medieval Spain.

The collection includes not only extensive background notes for Hamilton's major books and articles, but also over 200 original legajos and other documents pertaining to Spanish trade and economic development, dating primarily from the 17th and 18th centuries. Other primary source materials from the 14th to the 18th centuries are also abundant (chiefly in the form of photostats and transcripts), including hundreds of copies of documents held by the Archivo del Banco de España, the Archivo Histórico Nacional, and other archives in Europe.

Photocopies and microfilm copies of items which belong to other libraries and archives may require permission of the owner institution to further reproduce or publish. Users making further copies for their own research do so at their own discretion. Before publication of any such material, it is the user's responsibility to identify the original source and obtain permission.

The collection also contains drafts and reprints of research papers, and numerous folders of academic and personal correspondence. Some documents in the collection are in French or Spanish.

Note that the early dates given in collection and series titles reflect the dates of the original primary source material that Hamilton used for his research, not the date when the photostat, photocopy or transcription was created.

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Edwin Burmeister papers, 1960-2008 14.4 Linear Feet — 10,800 Items

Professor of Economics at Duke University. Collection contains teaching materials, research files, writings, correspondence with other economists, papers and presentations, and personal files chiefly related to Burmeister's work as a professor of economics at Duke University, the University of Virginia, and the University of Pennsylvania. Many collection materials document Burmeister's research on Capital Theory, Economic Growth Theory, and Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT).

Collection contains teaching materials; research files; writings; correspondence with other economists, including Paul Samuelson; papers and presentations; and personal files chiefly related to Burmeister's work as a professor of economics at Duke University, the University of Virginia, and the University of Pennsylvania. Many collection materials document Burmeister's research on Capital Theory, Economic Growth Theory, and Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT).

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The papers of Evsey Domar span the years 1939 through 1995, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1957 and 1989. The collection consists chiefly of professional correspondence between Domar and his colleagues, with smaller groups of materials consisting of writings; research materials; printed materials; speeches and lectures; and course materials relating to Domar's teaching career. Although Domar was interested in a wide range of subjects in the fields of economics and political science, the papers in this collection chiefly address his work on serfdom and slavery, particularly in Russia; the economics of socialist systems of government; the economics of agriculture; and theories of productivity and efficiency. Other minor topics include macroeconomics; the economies of Yugoslavia and Lithuania; value-added tax systems; economic development, and growth in general, and the American economy.

The Correspondence Series consists of professional correspondence concerning recommendations, papers, publishing, trip planning and reports, invitation responses, and other academic affairs. Frequently Domar exchanged comments on papers and other writings with fellow colleagues and former students. Important correspondents include Don Patinkin, Mark Perlman, Allan Brown, Alexander Gerschenkron, Lauchlin Currie, Alvin Hansen, Joan Robinson, and many others.

The Research Materials Series contains papers documenting Domar's research on serfdom and slavery (particularly in Russia); productivity and efficiency; value-added taxes; and other topics. Several papers discuss the economies of Yugoslavia and Lithuania. Includes many graphs and tables relating to Domar's published and unpublished work. There are very few papers by other individuals.

The Printed Materials Series is made up of mostly hardcover books from Domar's personal library. Most are editions or translations of his own published works, but there are several works by other authors. Includes microfilm of 1904 Russian work on unknown subject matter, and 1980 translation of 1861 Russian work on serfdom in Russia.

The Course Materials Series contains lecture notes and other materials related to Domar's extensive teaching career in economics. Two notebooks from 1939 and 1940 reveal aspects of his student years

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Frank Allan Hanna papers, 1920-[ca. 1965] 7.5 Linear Feet — 2800 Items

Primarily professional papers documenting Hanna's research for the Social Science Research Committee, the American Statistical Association, the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, and other organizations; subjects include an analysis of census and manufacturing data, and the distribution of income and wealth. Other professional papers include general correspondence dated 1948 to 1956, and materials concerning Hanna's book, The Compilation of Manufacturing Statistics.

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Frank Whitson Fetter papers, 1902-1992 114 Linear Feet — 68,400 Items

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American economist on the faculty of Northwestern University, and economic advisor to international banks and governments. The papers of Frank Whitson Fetter span the years 1902-1992, with the bulk dating from the 1920s through 1980. Included are correspondence, diaries and journals, teaching materials, published books, articles and book reviews, and all the supporting research for these publications. There is also printed material, as well as additional research materials on index cards and microfilm. The files also contain fellowship and grant applications, conference and seminar programs, notes and texts of lectures and speeches, as well as financial papers, a scrapbook and photographs. The collection highlights the academic and consulting experiences (particularly the Kemmerer Commission) of a twentieth-century American economist, and documents his intellectual development as an historian of economic thought, as well as his many years of consulting and government service regarding international monetary issues. Centering on Fetter's publications and research, and to a lesser extent his teaching, the largest series in the collection are the Publications Series and the General Research Series. His publications and research focused on the study of the history of economics, British banking and monetary policy, inflation, and international economic thought. As reflected in the Correspondence Series, he corresponded with economists, academics, and writers. The Commissions, Consulting and Government Services Series includes the materials used to produce various economic reports for the foreign governments of Guatemala, Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia, Poland, and China. Other files contain Fetter's personal diaries, detailing how he spent his time while commissioned abroad, as well as an oral history about his international work. There is a relatively small amount of material concerning Fetter's personal life.

The papers of Frank Whitson Fetter span the years 1902-1992, with the bulk occurring from the 1920s through 1980. Included are correspondence, diaries and journals, college and university course materials, published books, articles and book reviews, and all the supporting research for these publications. There is also printed material, as well as additional research materials on index cards and microfilm. The files contain fellowship and grant applications, conference and seminar programs, notes and texts of lectures and speeches, as well as financial papers, a scrapbook and pictures. The collection highlights the academic and consulting experiences (particularly the Kemmerer Commission) of a twentieth-century American economist, and documents his intellectual development as an historian of economic thought. Centering on Fetter's publications and research, and to a lesser extent his teaching, the largest series in the collection are the Publications Series and the General Research Series. His publications and research focused on the study of the history of economics, in particular inflation and international economic thought. As reflected in the Correspondence Series, he corresponded with economists, academics, and writers. There is a relatively small amount of material concerning Fetter's personal life.

Fetter's research interests and publications were wide-ranging, and are documented in both the Publications and General Research Series. His articles and pamphlets from 1921-1990 address such topics as Irish and Latin American currency, economists and their relationship to politics, as well as trade, tariff and hard money issues. The articles focus mainly on the economic history of Great Britain in the 19th century, including the rise and fall of various economic trends and theories in the British financial system. One of the Kemmerer missions provided the basis for Fetter's first book, Monetary Inflation in Chile (1931), which foreshadowed his enduring interest in the causes of monetary instability. When later interests changed his focus to classical economics, and in particular to British economic thought from Adam Smith to John Stuart Mill, he illuminated the classic controversies over money and banking which at the time of the Napoleonic Wars shaped the economic theories and institutional structures that served Britain and the world before 1914. Such ideas are illustrated in Fetter's Development of British Monetary Orthodoxy 1797-1875 (1965) and The Economist in Parliament: 1780-1868 (1980). These are just two of the books for which the Publications Series holds drafts and final copies of manuscripts, revision notes, English and foreign language editions, background research, and correspondence. Manuscripts, research and correspondence are also available for Fetter's unpublished books, one dealing with the role of foreign capital in assisting developing countries, and the other concerning the rise of England's Overend, Gurney bank, and its subsequent financial collapse in 1866.

The General Research Series is a complement to the Publications Series, as Fetter used these research files for many different projects. The Alphabetical Files Sub-Series, organized by topic, reflect Fetter's personal and professional interests, and holds the body of reference material Fetter collected throughout his career. Much of this material deals with English banking history, and includes files on Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, the bullion controversy, and tariff issues. Examples of other interests are also in these files, including documents of Fetter's debunking efforts concerning the inscriptions on the Christ of the Andes monument and on the Jefferson Memorial. Other materials of interest are the de Tocqueville files, and his efforts at cataloging the economic references in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories. A second alphabetical series of index cards and microfilm contain research on many topics of interest to Fetter. The Research on Published Articles and Pamphlets Sub-Series complements the Published Articles and Pamphlets Sub-Series in the Publications Series and contains correspondence and background research for the articles and book reviews.

In addition to research, Fetter's career involved a great deal of international consulting outside academia. He eagerly accepted commissions for projects throughout the world, and in the 1920s participated in the missions led by the Princeton economist, E.W. Kemmerer (known as the "money doctor"), advising numerous Latin American governments and others on their monetary problems. The Commissions, Consulting and Government Services Series includes the materials used to produce various economic reports for the foreign governments of Guatemala, Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia, Poland, and China. Other files contain Fetter's personal diaries, detailing how he spent his time while commissioned abroad. Photographs taken during consulting visits are in the Pictures Series. He worked collaboratively with the US. government and the government of India, Cuba, and Germany to secure economic stability for each of these countries. In the early 1950s Fetter was a State Department advisor on the German Debt Settlement. Fetter also testified before United States Congressional and Governmental Committees in the 1950s. In 1974, an oral history interview conducted by someone from the Harry S. Truman Library detailed Fetter's years of consulting and government service regarding international monetary issues.

Not only was Fetter a consultant, he also taught economics at Princeton, Haverford College, Northwestern University, and, upon his retirement, at Dartmouth College, where he adapted his Northwestern University course material for his classes. Fetter occasionally taught or advised at institutions such as Swarthmore College, the School for Advanced International Studies, and the University of Wisconsin. Both the Northwestern University Series and the Teaching Sub-Series of the Professional Files Series highlight such Fetter courses as "Money and Banking,""History of Economic Thought,""International Investment," and "Latin American Culture and Civilization." Also of interest are the files on the Ford Foundation Faculty Research Summer Seminar in 1957, where Fetter taught "International Economic Problems and Economic Development" to faculty from various colleges and universities throughout the Midwest. Fetter served on various Northwestern University committees such as the Budget Committee (1954) and the Honor System Committee (1963-1964).

His Student Papers Sub-Series in the Personal Files Series and Teaching Files Sub-Series in the Professional Files Series describe his educational experiences both as a student and teacher. The Teaching Sub-Series chiefly covers Fetter's teaching experiences before his appointment to Northwestern University, with just a few files during and after the Northwestern years. Fetter applied for and received a number of fellowships and grants throughout his career including a grant from the American Philosophical Society in the 1980s for research on the Overend, Burney Bank. These files are found in the Fellowships and Grants Sub-Series of the Professional Files Series.

Letters to and from colleagues with whom Fetter was closely associated, as well as correspondence with friends and family members including his father, the Princeton economist, Frank Albert Fetter, can be found in the General Correspondence Series. Among his correspondents were J. Garner Anthony, Robert D.C. Black, J. Chester Bradley, R.C. Brooks, Colin Campbell, Lino Castillejo, S.G. Checkland, (Chick) Eagen, Luther Evans, Max Farrand, Milton Friedman, Craufurd Goodwin, Barry Gordon, Frank Graham, Keith Horsefield, Hollard (Ho) Hunter, Per Jacobsson, E.W. Kemmerer, John Maynard Keynes, Charles Kindleberger, Samuel Loescher, Vernon Mund, Leslie Pressnell, Lord Robbins, Richard Sayers, Franklin Scott, Joseph B. Shane, Frederick Jackson Turner, F.W. Taussig, Alan Valentine, Jacob Viner, C.R. Whittlesey and Harold Williamson. Other letter writers of note are E.M. Forster, Upton Sinclair, and Gore Vidal. The Midwest Economics Association Sub-Series consists of correspondence documenting Fetter's involvement with the association and his term as president in 1952. The References and Recommendations Sub-Series, the last in the series, include letters written by Fetter, as well as letters requesting recommendations, and letters thanking him for writing.

Varying aspects of Fetter's personal and professional life are reflected in this collection in both the Personal Files Series and the Professional Files Series. The Alphabetical Files Sub-Series in both series highlight his personal and professional interests. An enthusiastic sportsman, Fetter's canoe and cross-country ski trips are represented, as is his involvement in forestry and conservation through such groups as the Hanover Conservation Council and the Izaak Walton League of America. An active member of the Religious Society of Friends, Fetter's interest in peace concerns is evident throughout his life. He participated in the Institute of International Relations sponsored by the American Friends Service Committee, held at Haverford College in 1934 and 1935. These files are located in the Teaching Sub-Series of the Professional Files Series. During the 1970s, Fetter also supported peace efforts during the Vietnam conflict, participating in letter writing efforts to the U.S. Congress. His associations with a number of professional organizations are represented in the files of the American Economic Association, the Midwest Economic Association, the History of Political Economy, and the National Bureau of Economic Research. During the 1930s, he also wrote a number of editorials (primarily on gold issues) for the St. Louis Dispatch, which are also included here. Other complementing sub-series in the Personal and Professional Files Series are the Travel files and the Conference and Seminars files and the Lectures and Speeches files. Fetter traveled widely, sometimes to attend language school courses, and other times to attend conferences or deliver lectures throughout the world. Personal information, including his marriage to Elizabeth Pollard in 1929, and his second marriage to Elizabeth Stabler in 1978, are a part of the Biographical Material Sub-Series in the Personal Files Series. Financial information is found in the Financial Papers Sub-Series of the same series.

Fetter was a consistent diarist, and the Calendars, Diaries and Journals Series records many events of the author's life. The earliest diaries document Fetter's 1917-1918 work with the New York Shipbuilding Yard, and his 1920 trip and work throughout the Western United States. There are other miscellaneous travel journals, including those of Elizabeth (Polly) P. Fetter from her 1929 trip to China and her 1937 trip to England. There is also a straight run of calendars from 1967-1989, and an Address Book Sub-Series containing the addresses of friends and colleagues throughout the United States and abroad.

The Pictures Series contains personal images as well as documentary photographs of Fetter's consulting work. Included are images from the commissions in South and Central America, in Poland and China, from his consulting work in Cuba for the Commission of Cuban Affairs (1934), in Ecuador for the Export-Import Bank (1939), and in India for the Lend-Lease Administration (1943-1944). Yet the majority of photographs are from Fetter's trip to Russia in 1930, taken mainly in Kazan and Moscow. Other travel photographs include those taken at the Economic History meeting in Switzerland in 1965, the Economic History meeting in Switzerland in 1965, several canoe trips, and a Colorado ski trip in 1976. There are also photographs taken at Northwestern University in 1956 and Dartmouth College in 1968.

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Gerald M. Meier papers, 1928-2003 7.75 Linear Feet — 5400 Items

The papers of Gerald M. Meier span the years 1928-2003, with the bulk of the materials from 1941-2001. These materials document the growth of Meier's career from a student of economics to an academic economist. This collection includes personal and professional correspondence; lectures; course notes taken as a student or developed for his lectures on international economic relations; syllabi, reading lists, exams, and other course materials; materials relating to conferences attended; published writings; and audiotapes of interviews relating to the evolution of development economics. The Correspondence Series is largely of a professional nature, and is chiefly concerned with international and development economics. Prominent among Meier's correspondents were Peter Bauer, Gottfried Haberler, W.A. Lewis, Hla Myint, Paul Rosenstein-Rodan, W.W. Rostow, Dudley Seers, H.W. Singer, and Paul Streeten.

Many of Meier's major publications are represented in the Writings and Speeches Series. These include Economic Development, Emerging from Poverty, The International Economics of Development, International Trade and Development, Leading Issues in Development Economics, Pioneers in Development, and the Problems series of books. Though there are more than a few folders containing materials on conferences attended by Meier, by and large the Subject Series contains a great deal of course materials. From his days as a student, there are notes, exams, syllabi, reading lists, and bibliographies from Reed College, Harvard University, and University of Oxford concerning courses taken under Edward Chamberlin, Gottfried Haberler, John Hicks, Wassily Leontief, and others. Also, there is material representing the several law courses Meier enrolled in at Yale University and Stanford University. Among the lecture notes from Williams College, Wesleyan University, Yale University, and Stanford University, there are also syllabi, exams, and reading lists representing his tenure as a professor. Of particular note are the several folders concerning Meier's role in the genesis and growth of the College of Social Studies at Wesleyan University.

Accession (2010-0211) also contains work from Meier's career, including reprints of his articles (dated 1949-1984) and materials from his lectures and presentations on development economics (dated 1986-2002). Also included are some miscellaneous correspondence, grant proposals, and book reviews. A large portion of the accession relates to Meier's writings, including his drafts and correspondence from several books, especially Frontiers of Development Economics (published 2001) and Development: Biography of a Subject (published 2004). Another section of interest is Meier's collection of materials on the career of John Hicks, a 1972 Nobel prize-winning economist. The collection includes article reprints written by Hicks, some clippings about his life, and an undated, unpublished manuscript titled "The Theory of Demand and the Theory of Welfare."