Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject Economics -- Study and teaching -- United States Remove constraint Subject: Economics -- Study and teaching -- United States
Number of results to display per page
View results as:

Search Results

Collection

Albert E. Rees papers, 1966-1992 10.5 Linear Feet — Seven boxes.

Albert Rees (1921-1992) was a former professor of economics at Princeton University and economic advisor to President Gerald Ford. This collection documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, and teaching. It forms part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

This collection contains correspondence, lectures, writings, and course notes. There is also testimony involving a union dispute.

Collection

Alvin Roth papers, 1969-1998 20.1 Linear Feet — 26 boxes. — 57 Megabytes — One set.

Online
Alvin Roth (born 1951) is a Nobel Prize winner and the Craig and Susan McCaw Professor of Economics at Stanford University. This collection documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, research, and faculty activities. It was acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

This collection covers Roth's early career at the University of Pittsburgh, including his research and correspondence from that period, as well as drafts of some of his well-cited articles and writings. Approximately one-half of the material lies in the Correspondence and Working Papers series, which includes professional correspondence and many drafts of scholarly articles. This arrangement replicates Roth's original filing system, which offers insight into his communication and collaboration style. Notable correspondents include Roy Weintraub, Robert Aumann, Ido Erev, Uriel Rothblum, and many more. Also included are various subject files, including Winner's Curse, Matching, and Learning.

Another notable component of the collection is the Writings and Research series, which includes working drafts and data printouts of his work in game theory and its real-world applications.

The Writings by Others series has some overlap with the Correspondence and Working Papers series, but for the most part, the former includes only the article from Roth's fellow economists, without the collaborative or feedback aspect present in the latter series.

The Teaching and Coursework series includes Roth's lecture notes and teaching tools, such as transparencies. His own coursework from Stanford University is also present, including notes, exams, syllabi, and lectures on topics such as microeconomics, competitive strategies, game theory, and choice theory.

Finally, the Grants series includes application material, correspondence, reports, and financials for various grants.

Collection

Arthur I. Bloomfield papers, 1927-1995 12 Linear Feet — 12 boxes and one oversize folder.

Arthur Bloomfield (1914-1998) was a professor emeritus of economics at the University of Pennsylvania. This collection documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, research, and professional and faculty activities. It forms parts of the Economists' Papers Archive.

This collections chiefly consists of research files from Bloomfield's job as an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 1941-1958, professional and academic correspondence received or written from 1931-1995, research notes on various topics in international finance, notes for his university classes on the history of economic thought, and research files on the pre-1914 gold standard. The papers document Bloomfield's career as economist and professor of economics, with special emphasis on his work as economic consultant for the United States federal government, particularly for the Federal Reserve Bank of NY, and for the governments of post-World War II South Korea and Indochina. His chief areas of research activity focused on international banking, evaluating foreign aid programs, the pre-1914 gold standard, and economic development in the UK and British Commonwealth countries (including the British West Indies), and economy and banking in Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, the Congo, and Zaire. Substantial materials on the history of economic thought can be found in Bloomfield's teaching files.

The Correspondence series, contains letters received or written by Bloomfield over the period 1931-1995. Arranged in folders chronologically, this substantive collection of letters lends insight into Bloomfield's professional and academic life.

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York series contains material pertaining to Bloomfield's first career, spanning 17 years, as an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of NY. For that position, he wrote a number of research memoranda and in-house articles on a wide range of international finance topics. Before World War II, he wrote mostly on economic developments in the UK and British Commonwealth countries, but after the war his research memoranda involved a broader range of topics.

The Pre-1914 Gold Standard series contains research notes for an intended book on the functioning of the international gold standard, 1880-1914. Bloomfield embarked on a year-long research trip to Europe in 1957 on a Rockefeller grant, visiting twelve European central banks, including the Bank of England where he spent over six months. In the end, he did not complete the book, but did write three substantial monographs from his notes: Monetary Policy under the International Gold Standard, 1880-1914 (Federal Reserve Bank of NY, 1959); Short-term Capital Movements under the Pre-1914 Gold Standard (Princeton University Press, 1963); and Patterns of Fluctuation in International Investment before 1914 (Princeton University Press, 1968). Although these books are not in the collection, this series contains one file folder for many countries or geographical areas, including: Switzerland, US, Sweden, Norway, Italy, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Egypt, France, Canada, Great Britain, Japan, Germany, Finland, Denmark, Russia, Belgium, Netherlands, Austria, and Hungary.

The History of Economic Thought series is an extensive collection of files on diverse topics in the history of economic thought. After 1974, Bloomfield's research became increasingly devoted to the history of economic thought, and he taught both graduate and undergraduate level classes on the subject at the University of Pennsylvania.

The Research series contains research notes associated with various overseas assignments and trips. Over the period 1949-1984, Bloomfield made numerous trips to developing countries as a consultant, in some cases helping to establish the Central Bank (e.g., South Korea), or in other cases evaluating foreign aid programs to those areas (e.g., Indochina). In addition to notes made in preparation for, and during, these assignments, this series also contains notes for several articles (published and unpublished), speeches, and conferences.

The bulk of the Other Papers series consists of papers from Bloomfield's undergraduate days at McGill University, including one paper written in 1937 for Frank Knight's ECO 305 class at the University of Chicago, titled "Thorstein Veblen and his Analysis of Business Enterprise."

Collection

Calvin Bryce Hoover papers, 1922-1970 41.5 Linear Feet — 77 boxes.

Online
Calvin Hoover (1897-1974) was the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Economics and dean of the Graduate School at Duke University. This collection primarily documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, research, and professional and faculty activities. It forms part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

This collection includes correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed material.

Correspondence contains mostly academic or professional correspondence. It is important to note that Hoover tended to file his correspondence by subject, rather than by correspondent. As such, a file labeled "John Doe" may not necessarily contain correspondence written by "John Doe," but may include correspondence about "John Doe."

Writings includes copies of Hoover's publications, unpublished material, addresses, drafts, notes, publication agreements, and correspondence.

Academia includes departmental files, course files, and other material associated largely with Hoover's work at Duke University. Includes material about the Economics Department, professors, courses taught by him, correspondence, theses, and other files.

Professional Associations includes files on the American Economic Association, the Southern Economic Association, and the Ford Foundation.

Government Service includes general subject files; files on war agencies, the Committee for Economic Development, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Economic Cooperation Administration; and correspondence.

Subject Files includes general topical files.

Audio and Visual Material includes photographs and audioreels.

Personal includes Hoover's personal school papers, souvenirs, and personal papers belonging to hife wife, Faith.

Printed Material includes publications not authored by Hoover. A fair number of these are in German and Russian.

Of note is the material pertaining to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), which offers a unique picture of the work of the OSS in Scandinavia, the Chief of Mission in Stockholm, Hoover's administrative style and means of controlling this operation, his philosophy of intelligence, and many day to day details of the profession of espionage.

Other topics of interest include the administration of an academic department during wartime, Soviet economic data and collection techniques of the 1930s, the formation of New Deal agricultural policies, and the development of the American foreign aid program.

Collection

Charlotte DeMonte Phelps papers, 1955-2013 6.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes.

Charlotte Demonte Phelps (born 1933) is a professor emerita of economics at Temple University. This collection primarily documents her professional life through her correspondence, writings, research, and professional and faculty activities. It was acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

Most of this collection is comprised of material related to Phelps' academic endeavors. Her correspondence primarily addresses colleagues across the field of economics. Her teaching material is from a number of her most-taught courses and includes student papers Phelps deemed excellent and worthy of saving. Her writings includes her honor's thesis, dissertation, and a number of published articles. Unpublished works such as conference papers can be found in a compilation of materials prepared for a promotion and tenure committee, along with further correspondence, both of which are housed in the Professional Service series. Also present are a number of conference programs and proceedings attended by her that attest to her involvement in her field. The Personal series deals mainly with her marriage to Edmund Phelps, including a marriage license, photographs, and series of letters following their divorce. Also included are a number of photographs with colleagues and a scrapbook of photographs.

Collection
Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Leland Gordon was Professor of economics at Denison University who served on the Board of Directors of Consumers Union from 1942-1949. The Leland Gordon papers include correspondence, manuscript of papers and book chapter drafts for Economics for Consumers, conference proceedings and other printed materials. Topics include consumer education and protection, consumption, economic aspects of burial and funeral practices, packaging and labeling of products, weights and measures, and World War II-era wartime economies. Institutions represented in the collection include Denison University, the National Council of Churches, Office of Price Administration, and Stephens College. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Leland Gordon papers include correspondence, manuscript of papers and book chapter drafts for Economics for Consumers, conference proceedings and other printed materials. Topics include consumer education and protection, consumption, economic aspects of burial and funeral practices, packaging and labeling of products, weights and measures, and World War II-era wartime economies. Institutions represented in the collection include Denison University, the National Council of Churches, Office of Price Administration, and Stephens College.

Collection

Douglass C. North papers, 1942-2012 50 Linear Feet — 100 boxes.

Douglass C. North (1920-2015) was a Nobel Prize winner the Spencer T. Olin Professor Emeritus in Arts and Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. This collection documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, and professional and faculty activities. It forms part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

This collection chiefly consists of professional correspondence written and received by North, writings by him and other colleagues, and files on conferences attended by him. There are also materials related to courses that he taught. The collection documents his career as an economist and professor at the University of California, Berkeley; the University of Washington; Rice University; and Washington University in St. Louis, and it reflects his interests in economics, the economic history of the western world, transaction costs, economic development, institutional change, and industrialization and technology. More specifically, the papers document his long-standing interest in explaining institutional change and political economies without relying exclusively on neo-classical economic theories.

Among the correspondents are Yoram Barzel, Robert Bates, Reuven Brenner, Robert Clower, R. H. Coase, Robert Fogel, Robert Haveman, Robert Keohane, Simon Kuznets, Deirdre N. McCloskey, Emily Chamlee-Wright, Elinor Ostrom, Vernon Smith, T. N. Srinivasan, John J. Wallis and Barry R. Weingast. Some of these correspondents are also represented in the Writings series, which contains drafts, notes, and reprints of writings by North as well as writings by his colleagues.

North's secretary at Washington University at St. Louis, Fannie Batt, is an important figure in understanding the nature of this collection. After receiving the Nobel Prize in 1993, his correspondence expanded substantially, and Batt was tasked with handling it. She printed email for him from her email account. His responses to emails are not as frequent as one would expect; existing responses were often dictated by North and typed by Batt.

Collection

Duncan Foley papers, 1965-2001 16.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes.

Duncan Foley (born 1942) is the Leo Model Professor Emeritus of Economics at The New School for Social Research. This collection primarily documents his professional life through his writings, research, correspondence, and teaching. It forms parts of the Economists' Papers Archive.
Collection

Earl J. Hamilton papers, 1350-1995, bulk dates 1650-1940 45 Linear Feet — 56 boxes and three oversize folders.

Earl Hamilton (1899-1989) was a professor emeritus of economics at the University of Chicago (after beginning his career at Duke University). This collection primarily documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, research, and teaching. It forms parts of the Economists' Papers Archive.

Hamilton's published works represented in this collection include Money, Prices, and Wages in Valencia, Aragon, and Navarre, 1351-1500; American Treasure and the Price Revolution in Spain, 1501-1660; and War and Prices in Spain, 1651-1800. There is also a copy of his 1929 dissertation.

The collection includes not only extensive background notes for Hamilton's major books and articles, but also over 200 original legajos and other documents pertaining to Spanish trade and economic development, dating primarily from the 17th and 18th centuries. Other primary source materials from the 14th to the 18th centuries are also abundant (chiefly in the form of photostats and transcripts), including hundreds of copies of documents held by the Archivo del Banco de España, the Archivo Histórico Nacional, and other archives in Europe.

Photocopies and microfilm copies of items which belong to other libraries and archives may require permission of the owner institution to further reproduce or publish. Users making further copies for their own research do so at their own discretion. Before publication of any such material, it is the user's responsibility to identify the original source and obtain permission.

The collection also contains drafts and reprints of research papers, and numerous folders of academic and personal correspondence. Some items are in French or Spanish.

Note that the early dates in the collection reflect the dates of the original primary source material that Hamilton used for his research, not the date when the photostat, photocopy or transcription was created.

Collection

Edward C. Prescott papers, 1964-2014 7.0 Linear Feet — Four boxes.

Edward Prescott (1940-2022) was a Nobel Prize winner and a Regents Professor (of economics) at Arizona State University. This collection documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, teaching, and professional activities. It was acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

This collection contains drafts and published copies of Prescott's research papers and other writings, writings by others, professional correspondence, files from speaking engagements and presentations, and teaching material from his career at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Minnesota, and Arizona State University.

The Writings series contains drafts and published copies of research papers and academic articles written by Prescott and coauthors, including his 1964 dissertation "Adaptive Decision Rules for Macro Economic Planning" as well as writings with corecipient of the Nobel Prize, Finn E. Kydland.

The Writings by Others series includes articles and other writings on economics collected by Prescott for his own research or interest.

Engagements series includes material from lectures, presentations, and speeches given by Prescott.

Correspondence series contains letters, memos, and emails received or written by Prescott.

Teaching series contains syllabi, lecture notes, exams, correspondence, and other preparatory material for courses taught by Prescott at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Minnesota, and Arizona State University.