Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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Arthur I. Bloomfield papers, 1927-1995 and undated 12 Linear Feet — Approximately 7200 items

The papers of university professor and economist Arthur Bloomfield consist chiefly of research files from his job as economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 1941-1958, professional and academic correspondence received or written from 1931 to 1995, research notes on various topics in international finance, notes for his university classes on the history of economic thought, and research files on the pre-1914 gold standard. The papers document Bloomfield's career as economist and professor of economics, with special emphasis on his work as economic consultant for the United States federal government, particularly for the New York Federal Reserve Bank, and for the governments of post-World War II South Korea and Indochina. His chief areas of research activity focused on international banking, evaluating foreign aid programs, the pre-1914 gold standard, and economic development in the U.K. and British Commonwealth countries (including the British West Indies), and economy and banking in Malaysia, the Congo, and Zaire. Substantial materials on the history of economic thought can be found in Bloomfield's teaching files.

The papers of university professor and economist Arthur Bloomfield span the period from 1927 to 1995. They consist chiefly of research files from his job as economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 1941-1958, professional and academic correspondence received or written from 1931 to 1995, research notes on various topics in international finance, notes for his university classes on the history of economic thought, and research files on the pre-1914 gold standard. The papers document Bloomfield's career as economist and professor of economics, with special emphasis on his work as economic consultant for the United States federal government, particularly for the New York Federal Reserve Bank, and for the governments of post-World War II South Korea and Indochina. His chief areas of research activity focused on international banking, evaluating foreign aid programs, the pre-1914 gold standard, and economic development in the U.K. and British Commonwealth countries (including the British West Indies), and economy and banking in Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, the Congo, and Zaire. Substantial materials on the history of economic thought can be found in Bloomfield's teaching files. The collection is comprised of six series: Correspondence Series, Incoming and Outgoing; Federal Reserve Bank of New York Series; Pre-1914 Gold Standard Series; History of Economic Thought Series; Research Files Series; and Miscellaneous Series.

The Correspondence Series, Incoming and Outgoing, contains letters received or written by Bloomfield over the period 1931 to 1995. Arranged in folders chronologically, this substantive collection of letters lends insight into Bloomfield's professional and academic life.

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York Series contains material pertaining to Bloomfield's first career, spanning 17 years, as an economist at the New York Federal Reserve Bank. For that position he wrote a number of research memoranda and in-house articles on a wide range of international finance topics. Before World War II he wrote mostly on economic developments in the U.K. and British Commonwealth countries, but after the war his research memoranda involved a broader range of topics.

The Pre-1914 Gold Standard Series contains research notes for an intended book on the functioning of the international gold standard, 1880-1914. Bloomfield embarked on a year-long research trip to Europe in 1957 on a Rockefeller grant, visiting twelve European central banks, including the Bank of England where he spent over six months. In the end, he did not complete the book, but did write three substantial monographs from his notes: Monetary Policy under the International Gold Standard, 1880-1914 (Fed. Reserve Bank NY, 1959); Short-term Capital Movements under the Pre-1914 Gold Standard (Princeton Univ. Press, 1963); and Patterns of Fluctuation in International Investment before 1914 (Princeton Univ. Press, 1968). Although these books are not in the collection, this series contains one file folder for many countries or geographical areas, including: Switzerland, U.S.A., Sweden, Norway, Italy, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Egypt, France, Canada, U.K., Japan, Germany, Finland, Denmark, Russia, Belgium, Netherlands, Austria, and Hungary.

The History of Economic Thought Series is an extensive collection of files on diverse topics in the history of economic thought. After 1974 Bloomfield's research became increasingly devoted to the history of economic thought, and he taught both graduate and undergraduate level classes on the subject at the University of Pennsylvania.

The Research Files Series contains research notes associated with various overseas assignments and trips. Over the period 1949-1984, Bloomfield made numerous trips to developing countries as a consultant, in some cases helping to establish the Central Bank (e.g. South Korea), or in other cases evaluating foreign aid programs to those areas (e.g. Indochina). In addition to notes made in preparation for, and during, these assignments, this series also contains notes for several articles (published and unpublished), speeches, and conferences.

The bulk of the Miscellaneous Series consists of papers from Bloomfield's undergraduate days at McGill University, including one paper written in 1937 for Frank Knight's ECO 305 class at the University of Chicago, titled "Thorstein Veblen and his Analysis of Business Enterprise."

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Axel Leijonhufvud papers, 1953-1980 and undated 4.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 3,000 Items

Swedish economist, currently professor emeritus at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and professor at the University of Trento, Italy. The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud date from 1953-1980 and consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory, especially as it pertains to finance; instability and disequilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general. A few items are in Swedish.

The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory; instability and (dis)equilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general.

The Correspondence Series includes communications from notable individuals such as Armen Alchian, Robert W. Clower (co-author), Robert Dorfman, Alan G. Gowman, Bert Hoselitz, Erik Lundberg, Gunnar Myrdal, and Joan Robinson. A few items are in Swedish. The Writings and Research Series includes Leijonhufvud's master's thesis and notes, doctoral dissertation and related research, and a variety of graduate papers in addition to drafts and published pieces; there are six subseries - Axel Leijonhufvud Writings, Class Lecture Notes, Dissertation, Graduate Work, Research and Notes, and Writings by Others. Within the latter there is a sizeable amount of unpublished and later-published manuscripts by Joan Robinson, fellow economist and close colleague.

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Charlotte Phelps papers, 1955-2013 6.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes

The collection contains the papers of Charlotte DeMonte Phelps, economist and Professor of Economics Emerita at Temple University. The papers are primarily academic in nature, but contain some personal documents. They contain information about her life in academia, course materials, research, and writings. Also present is her professional correspondence.

The collection contains several series: Correspondence, Teaching Material, Writings, Professional Service and Personal Files. Most of the collection is comprised of material related to Phelps' academic endeavors. Her correspondence covers 1957-2010 and primarily addresses colleagues across the field of economics. The teaching material is from a number of her most-taught courses and includes student papers Phelps deemed excellent and worthy of saving. The writings include her honor's thesis, dissertation, and a number of published articles. Unpublished works such as conference papers can be found in a compilation of materials prepared for a promotion and tenure committee, along with further correspondence, both of which are housed in the Professional Service Series. Also present are a number of conference programs and proceedings attended by Phelps that attest to her involvement in her field. The personal files deal mainly with her marriage to Edmund Phelps, including a marriage license, photographs, and series of letters following their divorce. Also included are a number of photographs with colleagues and a scrapbook of photographs.

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The papers of Evsey Domar span the years 1939 through 1995, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1957 and 1989. The collection consists chiefly of professional correspondence between Domar and his colleagues, with smaller groups of materials consisting of writings; research materials; printed materials; speeches and lectures; and course materials relating to Domar's teaching career. Although Domar was interested in a wide range of subjects in the fields of economics and political science, the papers in this collection chiefly address his work on serfdom and slavery, particularly in Russia; the economics of socialist systems of government; the economics of agriculture; and theories of productivity and efficiency. Other minor topics include macroeconomics; the economies of Yugoslavia and Lithuania; value-added tax systems; economic development, and growth in general, and the American economy.

The Correspondence Series consists of professional correspondence concerning recommendations, papers, publishing, trip planning and reports, invitation responses, and other academic affairs. Frequently Domar exchanged comments on papers and other writings with fellow colleagues and former students. Important correspondents include Don Patinkin, Mark Perlman, Allan Brown, Alexander Gerschenkron, Lauchlin Currie, Alvin Hansen, Joan Robinson, and many others.

The Research Materials Series contains papers documenting Domar's research on serfdom and slavery (particularly in Russia); productivity and efficiency; value-added taxes; and other topics. Several papers discuss the economies of Yugoslavia and Lithuania. Includes many graphs and tables relating to Domar's published and unpublished work. There are very few papers by other individuals.

The Printed Materials Series is made up of mostly hardcover books from Domar's personal library. Most are editions or translations of his own published works, but there are several works by other authors. Includes microfilm of 1904 Russian work on unknown subject matter, and 1980 translation of 1861 Russian work on serfdom in Russia.

The Course Materials Series contains lecture notes and other materials related to Domar's extensive teaching career in economics. Two notebooks from 1939 and 1940 reveal aspects of his student years

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Franklin Marvin Fisher (1934-2019) was an American economist and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 1960 until he became professor emeritus in 2004. The collection includes materials documenting Fisher's professional life as an economist and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. It contains Fisher's professional correspondence, including letters of recommendation and reader reports; a portion of this series is restricted during Fisher's lifetime. The collection also contains writings by Fisher, including including drafts and typescripts of articles and writings on corporate monopolies, natural resources and commodities, aggregate production, equilibrium, and econometrics. There is also a significant body of work from Fisher's collaboration with Karl Shell on their book, Economic Analysis of Price Production Indexes. Another large portion of the collection documents Fisher's consulting work, especially his role as an expert witness on a variety of monopoly and antitrust cases, including US vs. IBM, Eastman Kodak vs. Polaroid, and US vs. Microsoft. Also represented in the papers is Fisher's role in the Harvard Middle East Water Project, the Peace Now Project, and other projects seeking to bring peace through water allocation. Finally, the papers include details about Fisher's various professional engagements and membership in various associations, as well as his teaching files, lecture notes, and assorted materials related to his appointment at MIT.

The Franklin M. Fisher Papers document the research, teaching, writings, and professional activities of noted MIT economist Franklin Fisher. The collection reflects Fisher's wide-ranging interests and expertise, including his collaboration on water management and conflict resolution issues in the Middle East; his work as a legal expert on anti-trust lawsuits for assorted corporations and the U.S. Dept. of Justice; his service as a professor and mentor to numerous economics students, largely between the 1970s and 1990s; and his correspondence with leading economists such as Robert Clower, Frank Hahn, Peter Diamond, and Lawrence Klein. His materials have been arranged into series: Writings, Lectures and Teaching, Engagements, Consulting Work, and Correspondence.

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Gerald M. Meier papers, 1928-2003 7.75 Linear Feet — 5400 Items

The papers of Gerald M. Meier span the years 1928-2003, with the bulk of the materials from 1941-2001. These materials document the growth of Meier's career from a student of economics to an academic economist. This collection includes personal and professional correspondence; lectures; course notes taken as a student or developed for his lectures on international economic relations; syllabi, reading lists, exams, and other course materials; materials relating to conferences attended; published writings; and audiotapes of interviews relating to the evolution of development economics. The Correspondence Series is largely of a professional nature, and is chiefly concerned with international and development economics. Prominent among Meier's correspondents were Peter Bauer, Gottfried Haberler, W.A. Lewis, Hla Myint, Paul Rosenstein-Rodan, W.W. Rostow, Dudley Seers, H.W. Singer, and Paul Streeten.

Many of Meier's major publications are represented in the Writings and Speeches Series. These include Economic Development, Emerging from Poverty, The International Economics of Development, International Trade and Development, Leading Issues in Development Economics, Pioneers in Development, and the Problems series of books. Though there are more than a few folders containing materials on conferences attended by Meier, by and large the Subject Series contains a great deal of course materials. From his days as a student, there are notes, exams, syllabi, reading lists, and bibliographies from Reed College, Harvard University, and University of Oxford concerning courses taken under Edward Chamberlin, Gottfried Haberler, John Hicks, Wassily Leontief, and others. Also, there is material representing the several law courses Meier enrolled in at Yale University and Stanford University. Among the lecture notes from Williams College, Wesleyan University, Yale University, and Stanford University, there are also syllabi, exams, and reading lists representing his tenure as a professor. Of particular note are the several folders concerning Meier's role in the genesis and growth of the College of Social Studies at Wesleyan University.

Accession (2010-0211) also contains work from Meier's career, including reprints of his articles (dated 1949-1984) and materials from his lectures and presentations on development economics (dated 1986-2002). Also included are some miscellaneous correspondence, grant proposals, and book reviews. A large portion of the accession relates to Meier's writings, including his drafts and correspondence from several books, especially Frontiers of Development Economics (published 2001) and Development: Biography of a Subject (published 2004). Another section of interest is Meier's collection of materials on the career of John Hicks, a 1972 Nobel prize-winning economist. The collection includes article reprints written by Hicks, some clippings about his life, and an undated, unpublished manuscript titled "The Theory of Demand and the Theory of Welfare."

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H. Gregg Lewis papers, 1939-1990 28.5 Linear Feet — 17,100 Items

The papers of H. Gregg Lewis, an economist and university professor, span the period 1939 to 1990 with the bulk of the collection dating from the early 1980s. The collection is comprised chiefly of research and background materials for his book Union Relative Wage Effects: A Survey (University of Chicago Press, 1986), and of a collection of various academic articles (mostly working papers on various topics in labor economics). Materials represented in this particular collection include book manuscripts; drafts of papers (including unpublished articles); correspondence; lecture notes and syllabi for several classes taught at Chicago and for others at Duke; referee reports; administrative paperwork associated with the University of Chicago; and papers written by other economists. The primary subjects covered in this collection are: labor economics, trade unions and relative wage effects, University of Chicago Department of Economics, and Duke University Department of Economics. Important and/or substantial correspondence includes those with Gary Becker, Walter Oi, Albert Reese, Sherwin Rosen, and Finis Welch.

H. Gregg Lewis, one of the founders of modern labor economics, brought an unbiased, empirical approach to a field then dominated by the institutionalist school. According to Sherwin Rosen, "Professor Lewis was a pioneer in promoting empirical research with strong microeconomic foundations and in expanding the range of substantive problems that were amenable to economic analysis. This may be his most important legacy to economics." (Rosen, 1994).

A meticulous researcher, Lewis trained his methodical, detail-oriented eye on topics that included the allocation of time between market and non-market activities, the allocation of labor among alternative uses, and the compensation of labor. It is the topic of the influence of trade unions on wage differentials, however, to which Lewis contributed the bulk of his published work. His first book, titled Unionism and Relative Wages in the United States: an Empirical Enquiry was published in 1963, and his second book, Union Relative Wage Effects: A Survey was published in 1986.

Lewis was linked to the University of Chicago Department of Economics for over forty years, first as an undergraduate and then as a graduate student, but for most of this time as a faculty member. As such, his career was inextricably linked to the events and personages of Chicago. He studied under Lloyd Mints, Henry Schultz, and Henry Simons and later was a colleague of Paul Douglas, Ted Schultz, Gale Johnson, Albert Reese, Al Harberger, Milton Friedman, Harry Johnson, Robert Fogel, and James Heckman, to name a few of the eminent economists at the University of Chicago during his tenure there.

The papers are organized in series as follows: Research Notes, Drafts and Proofs Series; Articles, Comments and Notes Series; Correspondence Series; Teaching Materials Series; and Colleagues' Articles: Indexed Series.

The Research Notes, Drafts and Proofs Series dates from around the early 1980s and contains all material found in the collection which relate to Professor Lewis' book Union Relative Wage Effects: A Survey (University of Chicago Press, 1986). His two books are more than just summaries of the existing literature; they also involved extensive work of his own. For example, he recalculated a substantial amount of the data presented in the studies in order to replace or correct what he perceived as errors. As such, this series contains much more than the expected background notes, manuscripts, and proofs. It is comprised of approximately 300 manila folders, each meticulously grouped together by Lewis and sequentially numbered within the groupings. A single manila folder might contain an article/study; notes on that article (e.g. on data sources and coverage, sample restrictions, controls, and definitions of variables); correspondence with the authors of the studies asking for clarification on statistics, variables, and equations; notes showing the numbers which Lewis obtained in reworking the authors' calculations; and manuscript drafts of each chapter. His 1986 book is essentially a synthesis of a number of studies on the relative wage effects of unions, and an update of his earlier Unionism and Relative Wages in the United States: an Empirical Enquiry (University of Chicago Press, 1963). In his second book, Lewis looked specifically at different studies written post-1963 that analyzed the union versus non-union relative wage differential. These studies largely use micro data on individual workers for structural modeling. Unlike his 1963 book, most of the studies analyzed in Union Relative Wage Effects are not University of Chicago economics theses.

The Articles, Comments, and Notes Series contains articles written by Professor Lewis -- many of which were never published. These include: "How Americans Use their Time" (1975), "Notes on Partial Equilibrium Analysis" (1975), "Notes on Corner Problems in Production and Utility Theory" (no date), "Unionism, Wages and Employment in U.S. Coal Mining, 1945-68" (1971), "Notes on the Shadow Price of Household Time" (no date), "The Impact of Unionism on Relative Wages in the U.S." (1963), "Employer Interests in Employee Hours of Work" (late 1960s), "Notes on the Economics of Hours of Work" (1967), and various article reprints and comments that were published during the 1930s-1950s. This series also contains drafts of comments on colleagues' papers that were published. In addition, there are background notes on various topics, e.g. notes on a paper that he and Gary Becker worked on jointly regarding the interaction between the quantity and quality of children. This series also contains a copy of Professor Lewis' Ph.D. thesis, "Studies in the Elasticity of the Demand for Steel" (University of Chicago, March 1947).

The Correspondence Series is quite a substantive collection of letters Professor Lewis wrote to fellow economists or received from them over the period 1958 - 1986. It also includes a file containing referee reports (mostly done for the Journal of Political Economy). Note that the "University of Chicago" file excludes those pieces of correspondence with Albert Reese (who served as the Chairman of the Department of Economics during the 1960s). Instead, those letters are found in the file "Correspondence with Al Reese." The file titled "University of Chicago Department of Economics" contains correspondence that mostly relates to administrative duties that Lewis had as Director of Graduate Studies. Note that the "Milton Friedman" file is sparse, containing only three letters written between Friedman and Lewis. The "AEA Distinguished Fellow, 1981" file contains letters of congratulations from friends and colleagues upon his receipt of this prestigious award.

The Teaching Materials Series covers the period 1967-1986. In chronological order, it contains the lecture notes for classes taught both at the University of Chicago and at Duke. In addition, there are five files (ca. 1979) on University of Chicago dissertations which he supervised even after moving to Duke. In the words of Sherwin Rosen, one of his former students, Professor Lewis wielded his influence largely in the one-on-one teaching he did, serving on the committees of over 90 graduate students at Chicago, and supervising six Ph.D. dissertations at Duke. According to Rosen, his real forte was in this capacity as thesis advisor engaged in "one-on-one teaching in his office, discussing thesis problems and progress and training young economists how to do research. He had no peer in those endeavors. He was extraordinarily unselfish and generous to students in giving away his ideas, time, and criticism." (Rosen, 1994).

His teaching efforts in the classroom, moreover, did not go unnoticed; at the University of Chicago he was awarded the Quantrell Prize for excellence in undergraduate teaching, and at Duke he was given the United Methodist's Teacher-Scholar award, both in recognition of his outstanding teaching.

Finally, the Colleagues' Articles: Indexed Series contains working papers and any hand-written notes (e.g. Lewis' calculations) on these papers. There are also pieces of correspondence related to the papers interspersed throughout this series.

References:

Rosen, Sherwin. H. Gregg Lewis Memorial Comments, 1994. Pamphlet reprinted by the Journal of Labor Economics, ed. Orley Ashenfelter.,

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Lauchlin Bernard Currie papers, 1931-1994 and undated 60.35 Linear Feet — 31,370 Items

English.

The Lauchlin Bernard Currie Papers, 1930-1997, serve to document the life, career, and theories of the economist. The collection chiefly consists of correspondence, published, materials, clippings, and subject files, and is primarily arranged chronologically and thematically. The bulk of the materials focus on Currie's analysis of macroeconomic policy during the New Deal, and growth, housing, and export policies for developing countries, especially Colombia. There is also material on China and Currie's mentor at Harvard Allyn Young

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Lloyd Appleton Metzler papers, 1937-1974 14 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,300 Items

Economist, University of Chicago faculty member, and consultant to a number of U.S. government agencies. Collection spans the years 1937-1974 and consists chiefly of Metzler's correspondence, notes and drafts, printed material, course-related materials, and typed copies of works by Metzler and others. Significant correspondents include Paul Samuelson and Kenneth Arrow. Most items relate to his career as an economic consultant for several U.S. government agencies including the Federal Reserve Board (1940s). Others relate to his work as a professor of economics at the University of Chicago. Topics covered by his papers include post-World War II policy and planning, British-American economic negotiations after the war, German monetary reform, monetary aspects of international trade, exchange rates, income transfer, instability theories, and the application of mathematics to economic theory. Collection may need further processing before materials can be used.

The Lloyd A. Metzler Papers span the years 1937-1974 and consist chiefly of professional correspondence, research notes ad drafts, printed material, teaching material, and typed drafts or reprints of works by Metzler and others. Significant correspondents include Moses Abramovitz, Kenneth Arrow, Harry Johnson, James Meade, and Paul Samuelson, with many letters, particularly between Meade, Metzler, and Johnson (1940s-1950s), containing in-depth exchanges about economics. There are a few exchanges with Gottfried Haberler on international trade. Several folders contain significant notes from Metzler's own student days at Harvard in the 1930s with Joseph Schumpeter, Wassily Leontief, and O. H. Taylor. Many items in the collection relate to Metzler's wartime service as an economic consultant for several U.S. government agencies including the Federal Reserve Board, as well as his post-war work with the Department of State and with the Secretary of the Treasury on monetary policy, among other issues. Other items relate to his work as a professor of economics at the University of Chicago, and offer insights into the views he held on economics in the context of the Chicago School. Topics represented by materials in the collection include post-World War II policy and planning, including British-American economic negotiations after the war and German monetary reform; monetary aspects of international trade; exchange rates; income transfer; instability theories; and the application of mathematics to economic theory. Some files of research notes and paper drafts contain unpublished work; one draft contains handwritten comments by Viner.

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Martin Shubik is Professor Emeritus of Economics and Seymour H. Knox Professor of Mathematical Institutional Economics at Yale University and the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. The Martin Shubik Papers span the years 1938 through 2017, and consist of his correspondence, research, writings, and his collaborations and professional affiliations.

The Martin Shubik Papers document his career as an economist. This collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on general equilibrium, game theory, the core, oligopoly and market structure, defense and war game analysis, nuclear deterrence, behavior and risk, financial institutions, and money.

The collection also documents his collaborations and communications with prominent economists, including Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, Milton Friedman, Oskar Morgenstern, John Nash, Paul Samuelson, Herbert Scarf, Lloyd Shapley, and others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Shubik's time at IBM, his consultancy work for the RAND Corporation, expert witness testimony, his role as a conference organizer and participant, and other professional activities; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Yale University.