Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject Editors -- United States Remove constraint Subject: Editors -- United States

Search Results

collection icon

Clay Felker papers, 1945-1996 14 Linear Feet — 9000 Items

Clay Felker (1925-2008) was an editor and publisher who edited magazines such as New York Magazine (which he founded in 1968), New West Magazine, Village Voice, and Esquire. Collection includes materials from Felker's journalism career, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1968 through 1981. The majority of the materials relate to Felker's publishing and editorial work on New York Magazine, New West Magazine, Village Voice, Esquire, and Daily News Tonight. Included are story ideas and correspondence with various writers and editors; drafts of articles and columns; contract and legal negotiations; correspondence from Felker's fans and friends; budgetary materials; press clippings and news coverage; and other miscellaneous materials. Also includes copies of Duke University Chronicle, 1948-1952, dating from Felker's years as a writer and editor; copies of The Blue Jacket, 1944-1945, dating from Felker's years as a sports editor; some personal correspondence and materials from Felker's friends and family; and some other miscellaneous material.

Collection includes materials from Felker's journalism career, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1968 through 1981. The majority of the materials relate to Felker's publishing and editorial work on New York magazine, New West magazine, Village Voice, Esquire, and Daily News Tonight. The collection contains the publications' annual reports, financial projections and budgets, circulation and advertising plans, and materials from stockholder questionnaires and meetings. Also included are story ideas and correspondence with various writers and editors, as well as drafts of articles and columns. Many materials are anonymous and undated, because the author's name is missing from Felker's version of the draft. Some writers and journalists represented in the collection include George Dennison, Benjamin Sonnenberg, Gail Sheehy (Felker's third wife), Aaron Latham, Robert Karen, Thomas Thompson, Arnold Beichman, Jimmy Breslin, Jane O'Reilly, Andrew Tobias, and many more.

Other magazine-related materials include contract and legal negotiations, particularly regarding Felker's launch of New York; his loss of New York and Village Voice; his acquisition of Esquire, The Advertiser, and AdWeek; and his subsequent loss of Esquire. Correspondence between Felker and various law firms involved in these sales and mergers is also included. There are also many letters, both congratulatory and condoling, reacting to his various career changes. Many of his friends and fans were powerful figures in the publishing world, including George Lang, Marianne Partridge, Peter Derow, Felix Rohatyn, Tom Wolfe, Gloria Steinem, Herb Goro, and Malcolm Forbes.

Press clippings covering Felker's career are also present in the collection, beginning with his early journalism career in the 1960s, but heavily covering his various publication acquisitions and activities as editor of New York, New West, Village Voice, Esquire, and The Daily News Tonight. Besides reporting on the acquisitions, these clippings also include profiles of Felker as well as evaluations and criticisms of his work. One subcomponent of the clippings includes coverage of the 1976 CIA press leak by Daniel Schorr to the Village Voice and the subsequent Congressional investigations.

The collection also includes files and materials from Felker's years as a producer at 20th Century Fox, where he proposed and developed story ideas for television and movies. The files include synopses of proposed scripts as well as expense reports for some of the research and travel he undertook.

The remainder of the collection is somewhat miscellaneous in content. There are issues of The Blue Jacket, 1944-1945, dating from Felker's years as a sports editor. Also represented are Felker's years at Duke, including his articles and editorials in a few issues of The Archive and Duke 'n' Duchess, as well as bound copies of the Duke University Chronicle, 1948-1952, dating from Felker's years as a writer and editor. There are also small amounts of correspondence and reports from some of Felker's other interests and ventures, many of which never went past the planning stages. There is some personal correspondence and materials from Felker's friends and family, dating largely from the 1970s, and some other miscellaneous material.

collection icon
John Seelye was a professor of English and American Literature at the University of California at Berkeley, University of Connecticut, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dartmouth College, and the University of Florida. The papers of John Seelye span the years 1862-2015, with the bulk of the papers dated between 1955 and 2007, covering Seelye's professional career as both an scholar and as an editor of the Penguin Classics series for literature. Although there are files related to his teaching and career as an academic, the emphasis of the collection is on Seelye's work as author and editor. The collection consists of correspondence (sent and received) and contracts; subject files Seelye maintained at each of his institutions and for his research; writings by Seelye, including book reviews, poetry, articles and prose, as well as books, including a copy of the Life of Asa G. Sheldon: Wilmington Farmer (1862); and personal items, which include incoming correspondence intended for Suzanne Everett Throop, who received a large number of love letters from "Marguerite" between 1897 and 1898 and some additional letters from "Harriet" and "Chandler" in the 1920s. Subjects in the papers include Mark Twain, the literary criticism and interpretation of Herman Melville's works and American literature generally, the West in fiction, rivers in the United States, cowboys in popular culture, the history of Plymouth Rock, and the publishing of poetry in the United States.

The papers of John Seelye span the years 1862-2015, with the bulk of the papers dated between 1955 and 2007, covering Seelye's professional career as both an scholar and as an editor of the Penguin Classics series for literature. Although there are files related to his teaching and career as an academic, the emphasis of the collection is on Seelye's work as author and editor. The Correspondence and Contracts Series includes primarily professional correspondence sent (1956-2014) and received (1958-2012 and undated) by Seelye, as well as contracts and supporting documents focusing on Seelye's contact with his publishers. The Academia Series contains subject files Seelye maintained during his professional career while at the University of California at Berkeley (1959-1965), the University of Connecticut (1966-1974), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1974-1984), the University of Florida (1984-2008), and Dartmouth (1982-1992). The Research/Subject Files Series includes materials related to research Seelye carried out to support his writings as well as subject files on people and topics of interest to him or related to other work he carried out. The Writings Series contains drafts, notes, edits, and published versions of Seelye's book reviews, film reviews, poetry, and prose, including his numerous scholarly and fiction essays and articles, books, and edited works. The Personal series contains assorted materials relevant to Seelye's life, including several versions of his curriculum vitae as well as early report cards, photographs and headshots, and school newspapers from his various schools. Also includes a Bible owned by Dwight L. Moody and incoming correspondence intended for Suzanne Everett Throop, including a large number of love letters from "Marguerite" between 1897 and 1898 and some additional letters from "Harriet" and "Chandler" in the 1920s. Subjects in the papers include Mark Twain, the literary criticism and interpretation of Herman Melville's works and American literature generally, the West in fiction, rivers in the United States, cowboys in popular culture, the history of Plymouth Rock, and the publishing of poetry in the United States.

collection icon

Will Inman papers, 1910-2009 69.5 Linear Feet — 42,754 Items

The correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, and printed material in the Will Inman Papers span from 1939-1999, and serve to document the life and literary career of the poet, essayist, editor, educator, and publisher.

Inman was a prolific corespondent and maintained regular correspondent relationships with his friends and family, as well as with his readers and other editors and authors. He also regularly wrote to political and social figures during the 1960s. These letters to public and political figures express admiration and voice concerns about political events and social conditions. Inman protested in favor of civil rights, ending the war in Vietnam, and various environmental causes, and his letters reflect his thoughts and opinions on these subjects. Inman was also in regular contact with the editors and publishers of various literary magazines and the letters to these individuals document his efforts to publish his work. The collection holds many of Inman's out going correspondence as he regularly kept copies of his own letters.

Inman's copious diaries provide almost daily detail of his life from 1950-1994. In his diaries Inman recorded daily events, poetic inspirations, and his responses to world events. The diaries also include information about the poetry he is working on and several include typescripts of completed poems.

Inman also kept detailed records concerning his completed writings. He kept typescript copies of his poems and other writings, ordering them chronologically into notebooks, and recording publication information onto the typescripts. In organizing this collection, Inman's notebooks were discarded, but the typescripts maintain the order they held while bound in the notebooks, and serve to provide a chronological overview of Inman's published and unpublished writings.

This collection also contains copies of several of the anthologies and literary magazines where Inman published his work and several of the poetic monographs that Inman authored.

Inman regularly published his early work in newspapers in North Carolina. The collection contains clippings of these early published works as well as clippings of Inman's mid 1960's newspaper column "Conchsounds in the Hills."

There are also photographs of the McGirt family from ca. 1910, chiefly mounted in albums, as well as Inman's baby book from 1923. (16 accessions from 1998 and 1999) (35,475 items, 59 linear feet; dated 1910-1999)

The addition (accession #2001-0195) (1676 items, 2.7 linear feet; dated 1940-2001, bulk 1976-2001) comprises mainly personal correspondence to and from Inman and Jimmy Santiago Baca, 1971-1995, including typescript poetry. It also includes typescript poetry by Inman as Bill McGirt, 1940-1956; other poetry by Inman; professional correspondence; and a journal kept by Inman, 2000-2001.

The addition (accession #2002-0143) (2250 items, 3.60 linear feet; dated 1982-2001) consists primarily of incoming and outgoing personal correspondence. Topics include Inman's poems, publication work, and his political activites. There is also poetry and prose by Inman and others, and 20 black-and-white and 148 color photographs.

The addition (accession# 2003-0124 and 2003-0181)(2775 items, 3.6 linear feet; dated 1957-2003, bulk 1970-1989) contains published and unpublished typescript poetry written by Will Inman. Also includes literary newsletters, periodicals and brochures; a notebook containing poetry, biographical information and professional correspondence; and a paperweight.

Addition (2009-0263) (500 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1976-2009) includes correspondence, poetry by Inman and others, press releases and reviews, official documents (such as his birth certificate, insurance information, and medical documents), and materials from Inman's death and funeral.