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American Literary Manuscripts records, 1930-1981 11.5 Linear Feet — 8598 Items

The American Literary Manuscripts Records (accession #5-6-81) (8,098 items, 10.8 lf; dated 1930-1979) documents the process by which the guide was created. It contains the correspondence of J. A. Robbins with each of his editors for each region of the United States (the Regional Chairmen), copies of the directives sent to participating libraries, copies of the master list of names to be checked, minutes of editorial board meetings, descriptions of the project, a proposal for a computerized updating of the census of library holdings of American literary manuscripts, negotiations with the publisher, grant requests, and reports. The correspondence between Midwest Regional Chairman, George Hendrick, and his Regional Associates is included in order to demonstrate how the project operated. The questionnaires returned by the libraries in that region are included. There are also ten printouts, included as a random sampling of printouts required. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The addition (accession #89-093) (500 items, 1 lf; dated 1962-1981) contains correspondence, background material, page proofs, post-publication additions and corrections, and publicity relating primarily to the 2nd edition of American Literary Manuscripts published in 1977. It updates the earlier edition published in 1960.

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DoubleTake records, 1908-1999, bulk 1994-1999 53.1 Linear Feet — Approximately 58,872 Items

The DoubleTake magazine records contain story manuscripts with editor's markings, correspondence, photographs and slides, and production files for issue numbers 1-16, 1994-1999. Files of editors Jay Woodruff, Rob Odom, and other editors contain correspondence with writers whose work they were interested in publishing and editing. There are postcards and transparencies used in various issues; and a complete run of the magazine through spring 1999. There are two unidentified files. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection holds story manuscripts (with editor's marks), correspondence, and production files for issues 1-16, 1994-1999. Files of editors Jay Woodruff, Rob Odom, and other editors contain correspondence with writers whose work they were interested in publishing and editing. There are postcards and transparencies used in various issues; and a complete run of the magazine through spring 1999. There are two unidentified files.

Later accessions include production files and correspondence between the magazine's editors and its contributors, also covering issues 1-16.

Accession 2010-0081 includes photographer name files, dating from 1993 (pre-production) through 1998, kept by Alex Harris and other DoubleTake staff. Files were created whenever a photographer corresponded with the magazine, and include copies of correspondence between editors and photographers, slides of sample work, contracts for those who were accepted as contributors, and occasional biographies or other information about the photographer. Some files represent a particular museum's exhibit rather than a personal photographer; these are designated with exhibit titles instead of a photographer's name.

Files are organized alphabetically, and include correspondence from well before the magazine began publication, as well as materials post-dating Harris's departure from the magazine.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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History of Political Economy records, 1967-2011 128.9 Linear Feet — 16,000 Items

Collection (1998-0229, 1998-0450, 1998-0455, 1999-0318, 1999-0365, 2000-0152, 2000-0184) (11950 items, 109.6 lin. ft.; dated 1967-1999) contains the files of published and unpublished manuscripts on the history of economics, arranged for the most part in chronological groupings and then alphabetically by author, along with referees' comments and editors' correspondence.

The addition (2001-0018) (100 items, 0.3 lin. ft.; dated 1995-1998) contains 23 manuscripts accepted for publication and their associated correspondence.

The addition (2001-119) (450 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2000) comprises files of published and rejected manuscripts. There is also information pertaining to the founding of the journal.

The addition (2001-0180) (200 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2001) contains rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2001-0194) (150 items, 1.0 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2001) contains 40 manuscripts accepted for publication and their associated correspondence. Five manuscripts included machine-readable records.

The addition (2001-0261) (525 items, 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 1994-1999) contains correspondence related to published and unpublished articles, primarily for volume 32. Includes 1 electronic document received on one floppy disk.

The addition (2002-0172) (1500 items, 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2002) comprises correspondence related to articles published in volumes 31.4, 33.2, and 34.2 as well as rejected articles. There are also folders related to HOPE conferences (1997-1999).

The addition (2003-0140) (130 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2003) includes published manuscripts for the Spring and Fall 2003 issues, as well as rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2003-0186) (375 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2003) consists of records for issues 32.1, 32.2, 34.1, 34.3, 34.4, and 35.1, including published and rejected manuscripts, and correspondence.

The addition (2004-0100) (250 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2004) consists of files containing rejected manuscripts, primarily from 2002-2003, along with related correspondence and readers' reports.

The addition (2006-0059) (1875 items; 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains files of unpublished and rejected manuscripts with related correspondence and peer reviews; and files of accepted manuscripts for issues 36.2, 36.3, 36.4, 37.2, and 37.4.

The addition (2007-0163) (950 items; 1.4 lin. ft.; dated 2003-2006) contains files of articles submitted for publication and correspondence, peer reviews, and revisions related to these articles. Also included are submissions that were rejected from publication.

The addition (2007-0164) (450 items; 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 2005-2006) includes manuscripts, revisions, and correspondence for articles published in issues 39.4 and 40.1; and rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2008-0265) (750 items; 1 lin. ft.; dated 2008) includes correspondence, manuscripts, and revisions for articles published in issues 40.1 and 40.2; also rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2008-0315) (900 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2008) includes rejected manuscripts and accepted articles for issues 41.1 and 41.2.

The addition (2009-0167) (800 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2009) includes rejected manuscripts and accepted articles for issues 41.3 and 41.4.

The addition (2010-0085) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2010) includes accepted and rejected manuscripts from issues 42.3.

The addition (2010-0124) (100 items; 0.2 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2010) includes correspondence between HOPE editors and authors regarding accepted articles for issue 42.4

The addition (2011-1007) (200 items; 0.5 lin. ft.; dated 2011-2012) includes accepted articles and papers for issues 43.3, 43.4, and 44.1.

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The Wesley Works Editorial Project, founded in 1960, is an international and inter denominational consortium of scholars that is producing a complete critical edition of the works of John Wesley, the 18th century Church of England clergyman who was a primary founder of Methodism. The Wesley Works Archive, dating from 1676 to 1996, with the bulk ranging from 1724-1791 and 1960-1996, forms part of the working papers of the Wesley Works Editorial Project (WWEP). The collection consists of that portion of the project's documents gathered by Frank Baker during almost four decades of service as the WWEP's editor and main bibliographer, and consists of the correspondence, writings, research, printed materials, photocopied manuscripts, proofs, and other materials produced by Baker and the many other historians, theologians, and clergy, who have participated in the Project. There is much information not only about the founding and early history of the Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Churches, but also about the history of religious thought and dissent in 18th century England, the Evangelical Revival, and the history of publishing; materials in the collection also throw light on such topics as scholarly publishing and textual criticism.

The Wesley Works Archive, 1676-1996 and undated, bulk 1724-1791, 1960-1996, forms part of the working papers of the Wesley Works Editorial Project (WWEP). Formed in 1960, this international and inter denominational consortium of scholars is producing a complete critical edition of the works of John Wesley, the 18th century Church of England clergyman who was a primary founder of Methodism. The collection consists of that portion of the Project's documents gathered by Frank Baker during almost four decades of service as the WWEP's General Editor, Textual Editor, and main bibliographer, and consists of the correspondence, writings, research, printed materials, photocopied manuscripts, proofs, and other materials produced by Baker and the many other historians, theologians, and clergy who have participated in the Project. Because John Wesley preached, wrote, and published so widely, the content of the research materials required for a full edition of his writings necessarily contains much information not only about the founding and early history of the Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Churches, but also much information about the history of religious thought and dissent in 18th century England, the Evangelical Revival, and the history of publishing. Beyond the ostensible purpose of the WWEP, however, the modern correspondence and scholarly debate contained in these papers also throws light on such topics as scholarly publishing and textual criticism.

The collection also sheds light on the history and mechanics of the transmission of texts. That is, while the reproduced printed materials here document the complex publishing and textual history of the thousands of editions of Wesley's writings to appear in his lifetime alone, at the same time the original writings of modern scholars involved in the WWEP document how older texts are researched and recovered from the past, all for the purpose of establishing a present authoritative text to be passed on to the future.

Series in the Wesley Works Archive are arranged to correspond to the unit structure of the thirty-five volume Bicentennial Edition. Described more fully below, the initial sixteen series of the archive and the sixteen units and thirty-five volumes of the Bicentennial Edition are as follows: Sermons (1-4); Explanatory Notes upon the New Testament (5-6); A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (7); Worship (8); The Methodist Societies (9-10); The Appeals to Men of Reason and Religion and Certain Related Open Letters (11); Doctrinal and Controversial Treatises (12-13); Social/Political Tracts (14); Catechetical/Educational Works (15); Editorial Works (16); Medical Writings (17); Journals and Diaries (18-24); Letters (25-31); Oxford Diaries (32); Bibliography (33-34); and Index and Miscellanea (35). A concluding seventeenth series, General Files, gathers materials about the overall history and organization of the WWEP.

The history of the Wesley Works Editorial Project already extends more than fifty years, from its inception in 1960 to the 2011 publication of The Methodist Societies: The Minutes of Conference. This volume, as the seventeenth to be published, marks the halfway point of the entire Bicentennial Edition, which will comprise thirty-four volumes plus a concluding general index volume. Although the General Files are placed as the final series in order to avoid interrupting the parallel structure of series and volumes, they actually mark the best place to begin an overview of the collection, since their various folder groups document much of the administrative history of the Project. Overviews and details of the Project's inception, history, institutional support, and editorial guidelines are best found in the folder groups for the Board of Directors and the Editorial Board. The history of the actual content, intellectual structure, and presentation of volumes can be found in such groups as grouped under such categories as Editorial Procedures and Bulletins of the WWP. Most of the latter were issued by Frank Baker in the 1970s and contain much detail about the content and style choices that were being made for various volumes. The General Files also contain materials that may relate to more than one unit of the Bicentennial Edition, as well as some Wesley publications not selected for inclusion, especially his Explanatory Notes Upon the Old Testament.