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Amber Arthun Warburton papers, 1917-1976 and undated 35 Linear Feet — circa 31,400 Items

Teacher, librarian, specialist in economics, labor, and education; New Deal administrator. Correspondence, diaries, writings, interviews, drafts of studies and reports, scrapbooks, printed material, photographs, and other papers, relating to Warburton's leadership in the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY), 1947-1963; and to Affiliated Schools for Workers, Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (M.A., 1927), Institute of Social and Religious Research, Mount Holyoke College, Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Spelman College, U.S. Children's Bureau, U.S. Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture. Topics include the rural youth guidance movement, training programs for unemployed teachers in the 1930s, women workers in the 1920s, African Americans in the early 1930s, industrial home work in the Northeast in the late 1930s, migrant farm workers in the Southwest and Florida in the 1940s to 1950s, socioeconomic conditions in coal mining villages in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois in the late 1920s, and in Harlan County, Ky., and Green Sea, S.C., in the late 1940s, and the effects of the National Defense Education Act on guidance in rural high schools.

The Amber (Arthun) Warburton Papers consist of the personal and professional papers of Warburton from 1917 to 1976. The bulk of the material comes from the organizational files of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth during Warburton's tenure as executive secretary and director of research, 1947-1963. Other organizations and institutions represented include Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (where she received her M.A. in 1927), Mount Holyoke College, Spelman College, Institute of Social and Religious Research, Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Affiliated Schools for Workers, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. Children's Bureau.

The Warburton Papers contain correspondence, financial statements, writings, interviews, notes, drafts of studies and reports, newspaper clippings, newsletters, printed material, books, magazines, photographs, diaries, and scrapbooks. Most of the papers are printed material. Also includes her diploma from Columbia (1927), and an oversize photograph of the Three Fates Greek scuplture.

The papers are divided into the following thirteen series:

Missing Title
  1. Personal
  2. Brookwood Labor College
  3. Columbia University
  4. Mount Holyoke College
  5. Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry
  6. Institute of Social and Religious Research
  7. Spelman College and Atlanta University
  8. Federal Emergency Relief Administration
  9. Affiliated Schools for Workers
  10. U.S. Children's Bureau
  11. Fairfax County
  12. U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture
  13. Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth

Warburton's connection with these organizations and institutions is noted in the description of each series.

The largest series is the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth Series (AGRY). The series is arranged by subject, in keeping with the arrangement pattern of a 1949 office files index. There are three major subjects within the series: Harlan County (Kentucky), Green Sea (South Carolina), and the National Defense Education Act Study. Each subject contains correspondence, notes, drafts of reports and studies, reports and studies, newspaper clippings, and printed material.

There is overlap among series, especially within the AGRY series. For instance, Warburton might correspond with one person in Green Sea about the Green Sea Institute and later about an upcoming guidance convention. Each letter would probably be found in different subjects: the Green Sea letter under Green Sea Institute, and the convention letter under material about guidance conventions.

The Warburton Papers are a rich source of information on the growth and development of the youth guidance movement in America, especially guidance in rural areas. If combined with the Duke Library's collection of early AGRY papers, a researcher could follow the American rural youth guidance movement from inception to maturation. Furthermore, the numerous surveys conducted in Harlan County and Green Sea contain much material on the socio-economic status and attitudes of people in those communities in the 1940's and 1950's, which may be valuable to the sociologist or historian studying Appalachia or the rural South.

Other highlights include considerable information on the creation, growth, and management of workers' schools and federal training centers for unemployed teachers in the 1930's; in-depth studies of industrial home-work in the Northeast and migrant workers in Texas, Arkansas, and Florida; and excellent pictures of schools, houses, and people in Harlan County and Green Sea. There are also photographs in the Personal, Columbia University, Spelman College and Atlanta University, U.S. Children's Bureau, and Fairfax County series.

Specific subjects are discussed in more detail in the inventory.

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Belmont Mercer Farley papers, 1787-1965, 2015 27.0 Linear Feet — Approximately 19,767 Items

Educator from Washington, D.C. Professional papers concern academic freedom, educational television, reading and illiteracy, rural education, attacks on textbooks, federal aid to education, school construction, and strikes. Also discussed are the Ford Foundation, American anti-communist sentiment, peace and war, the U.S. military, and the atomic bomb. There is extensive material on the National Education Association, particularly on public relations and the advent of American educational broadcasting. Also included are Farley's articles, addresses, and radio program scripts, all of which regard U.S. public schools, and material pertaining to educational organization conventions that Farley attended. Personal papers chiefly consist of letters on family genealogy, with some information on public education in Missouri and California, and detailed notes and a self-published 381-page book on the family genealogy, which includes many other families in addition to the Farleys and Mercers.

Belmont Farley's professional papers span his career as an educator, author, and staff member with the National Education Association, and concern academic freedom, educational television, reading and illiteracy, rural education, attacks on textbooks, federal aid to education, school construction, and strikes. Also discussed are the Ford Foundation, American anti-communist sentiment, peace and war, the U.S. military, and the atomic bomb. There is extensive material on the National Education Association, particularly on public relations and the advent of American educational broadcasting. Also included are Farley's articles, addresses, and radio program scripts, all of which regard U.S. public schools, and material pertaining to educational organization conventions that Farley attended.

Personal papers chiefly consist of letters exchanged between Farley and family members on family genealogy, with some information on public education in Missouri and California. There are also detailed notes and a self-published 381-page genealogy of the Farley-Mercer families, which stretches from Pensylvania, Maryland, North Carolina, Missouri, and other states, and offers detailed information on the Musser, Metzgar, Gosser, Greenlee, Youngs, Guarco, Dyer, Spangler, Cleland, Carr (Kerr), and Dinsmore families. This book was published in 1932, and updated and republished by Farley's son Thomas Farley in 2015.

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George Adams Shuford papers, 1952-1959 45 Linear Feet — 36,000 Items

Shuford's papers consist of 89 boxes of correspondence, reports, speeches, and memoranda from his office in Washington, 1952-1959. The collection is divided into four main categories according to the filing system used in the Congressman's office. Subjects, persons, and places appear throughout all categories.

The Shuford Papers were in filing drawers when originally cataloged. Later the papers were transferred to many smaller archival boxes. Since it was no longer easy to survey the contents, an informal inventory of the files was compiled by a student assistant. The collection remains in its original folders with their informal and frequently inconsistent labeling.

The correspondence has two divisions. First, there are letters filed alphabetically by names of correspondents (Boxes 1-21). However, each letter of the alphabet also has one or more folders in which the correspondence is filed only according to the first letter of the name. Secondly, there are letters filed chronologically in folders marked "Letters. Legislation" (Boxes 22-23) and "Letters. General" (Boxes 24-28). There are also several folders of letters of congratulations, recommendations, references, and sympathy (Box 28).

Volumes of guest books and an inaugural invitation (1953) are in Box 28.

Speeches and speech material are in Boxes 29-30.

Subject categories occupy Boxes 31-89. The folders are labeled and are filed according to the words underlined on each label. The labeling system was not consistent, and researchers must survey the subject categories for a given subject as well as the correspondence and speeches. Subjects notable for the quantity of material about them are: agriculture, the armed services, atomic energy, elections, civil rights, civil service, Colorado River, commerce, the Constitution, the Democratic Party, education, electric power utilities, finance, fish and wildlife, foreign relations, highways, Indians, the House Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, irrigation and reclamation, labor (often under education and labor), the judiciary, mines and mining, politics in North Carolina (especially the 12th congressional district for which there are election records on the precinct level), the Post Office, public lands, refugees, small business, the House Ways and Means Committee, tariffs, taxation, TVA, tobacco, veterans affairs, the Territories Subcommittee (Alaska and Hawaii), and water resources.

The chronology within folders is frequently out of order. The letters are not entered in the Autograph File.

2,000 Items added, 1-3-68. This addition to the subject categories of the Shuford Papers is notable for files on the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Cherokee Indians, and the Hell's Canyon Legislation.

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John Bonsack papers, 1786-1929 2 Linear Feet — 4 Boxes, 2,034 items.

Collection contains personal and business correspondence, and accounts and genealogical records of the Bonsack and Plaine families, connected by marriage. Included are letters from family members in schools in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New York. Included also are letters concerning woolen factories in Good Intent, Va., 1862, and at Bonsack, Va., during the 1880s. There are also references to David H. Plaine's work as a churchman, teacher, and politician in and around Roanoke, Va.; accounts of Jacob Bonsack, a merchant in Good Intent, Va., and accounts of Harry E. Plaine, a hardware dealer in Broken Bow, Neb., during the 1880s. About fifty letters, 1786-1851, are written in German to the two John Bonsacks, father (1760-1795) and son (1781-1859).

This collection contains personal and business correspondence, and accounts and genealogical records of the Bonsack and Plaine families, connected by marriage. Included are school and college letters from Emory and Henry College, Virginia, 1851, Calvert College, New Windsor, Maryland, 1851-1852, State Normal School, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1881, Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia, 1882, and Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York, 1883.

Included also are letters concerning woolen factories in Good Intent, Virginia, 1862, and at Bonsack, Virginia, during the 1880s, references to David H. Plaine's work as a churchman, teacher, and a politician in and around Roanoke, Virginia, accounts of Jacob Bonsack (1819-1889), as a merchant in Good Intent, Virginia; and accounts of Harry E. Plaine as a hardware dealer in Broken Bow, Nebraska, during the 1880s.

About fifty letters, 1786-1851, are written in German to two John Bonsacks, father (1760-1795) and son (1781-1859). Included in these are several religious tracts, memorandum books, study notes, and short diaries. The diaries contain accounts of a trip in 1856 from Randolph County, Virginia, to Madison, Wisconsin, travels in the vicinity of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and a record kept by D. H. Plaine in 1857.