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Belmont Mercer Farley papers, 1787-1965, 2015 27.0 Linear Feet — Approximately 19,767 Items

Educator from Washington, D.C. Professional papers concern academic freedom, educational television, reading and illiteracy, rural education, attacks on textbooks, federal aid to education, school construction, and strikes. Also discussed are the Ford Foundation, American anti-communist sentiment, peace and war, the U.S. military, and the atomic bomb. There is extensive material on the National Education Association, particularly on public relations and the advent of American educational broadcasting. Also included are Farley's articles, addresses, and radio program scripts, all of which regard U.S. public schools, and material pertaining to educational organization conventions that Farley attended. Personal papers chiefly consist of letters on family genealogy, with some information on public education in Missouri and California, and detailed notes and a self-published 381-page book on the family genealogy, which includes many other families in addition to the Farleys and Mercers.

Belmont Farley's professional papers span his career as an educator, author, and staff member with the National Education Association, and concern academic freedom, educational television, reading and illiteracy, rural education, attacks on textbooks, federal aid to education, school construction, and strikes. Also discussed are the Ford Foundation, American anti-communist sentiment, peace and war, the U.S. military, and the atomic bomb. There is extensive material on the National Education Association, particularly on public relations and the advent of American educational broadcasting. Also included are Farley's articles, addresses, and radio program scripts, all of which regard U.S. public schools, and material pertaining to educational organization conventions that Farley attended.

Personal papers chiefly consist of letters exchanged between Farley and family members on family genealogy, with some information on public education in Missouri and California. There are also detailed notes and a self-published 381-page genealogy of the Farley-Mercer families, which stretches from Pensylvania, Maryland, North Carolina, Missouri, and other states, and offers detailed information on the Musser, Metzgar, Gosser, Greenlee, Youngs, Guarco, Dyer, Spangler, Cleland, Carr (Kerr), and Dinsmore families. This book was published in 1932, and updated and republished by Farley's son Thomas Farley in 2015.

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Black educator, journalist, and reformer from Raleigh, North Carolina. Correspondence, scrapbooks of clippings, print material such as articles and reports, and other papers, all dating from the Civil War into the first few decades of the 20th century. Includes a fourth edition of Lunsford Lane's slave narrative. The material discusses and illuminates the problems experienced by emancipated blacks during Reconstruction and into the early 20th century, encompassing agriculture, business, race relations, reconstruction, education, politics, voting rights, and economic improvement for African Americans. Other topics include Durham and Raleigh, N.C. history; the temperance movement, Hunter's personal matters and family finances, the North Carolina Industrial Association, and the N.C. Negro State Fair. Significant correspondents include Charles B. Aycock, Thomas W. Bickett, William E. Borah, Craig Locke, Josephus Daniels, W.E.B. Du Bois, Charles G. Dawes, John A. Logan, Lee S. Overman, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, Charles Sumner, Zebulon B. Vance, and Booker T. Washington. There is also correpondence from two early African American Congressmen, Henry P. Cheatham and George H. White. Also included is a draft of a speech given by Frederick Douglass in 1880 at the 2nd Negro State Fair.

The Charles N. Hunter Papers date from the 1850s to 1932 and consist of Hunter's personal and professional correspondence, scrapbooks of clippings, articles, reports, and memorabilia. Correspondence relates to personal and financial matters, as well as to Hunter's various activities to improve African American education and economic well-being, particularly in the South. Specific topics touched on throughout his papers include race relations, voting rights, creating an educational system for African Americans, the temperance movement, reconstruction, African American business and agriculture, the North Carolina Industrial Association, and the North Carolina Negro State Fair. The three correspondence subseries form almost half of the Personal and Professional Papers Series . The correspondence subseries are: Business/Community Incoming Correspondence, Personal Incoming Correspondence, and Outgoing Correspondence. Among the correspondents are several African American Congressional representatives such as George H. White and Henry P. Cheatham; major political figures like Franklin D. Roosevelt and John Alexander Logan; important African American scholars including W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington; and many North Carolina governors, in particular Zebulon B. Vance, Charles B. Aycock, Locke Craig, and Thomas Walter Bickett. Although these letters address professional and political issues, Hunter established friendships with many of the noteable correspondents. The incoming correspondence has been arranged into letters pertaining to Hunter's business or community activities and letters relating to Hunter's personal life. There are also numerous drafts and copies of outgoing correspondence that Hunter wrote.

In the Other Professional Papers Subseries, there is a variety of miscellaneous printed materials and papers that cover Hunter's career as a teacher and principal, involvement in the N.C. Industrial Association, and role in the N.C. Negro State Fair. Included in this subseries is an array of print materials that provide a view of African American life in the South. This includes commencement invitations from historically black colleges and universities, a fourth edition of Lunsford Lane's slave narrative, and newspaper clippings. The bulk of this subseries deals with the larger Raleigh area, though some items address national issues.

The Writings and Speeches Subseries includes addresses given by Hunter and others. Most noteable is a transcription of Frederick Douglass' speech given at the 2nd Annual N.C. Negro State Fair. Amongst Hunter's writings are several pieces intended for a local encyclopedia which detail historic locales and important North Carolina men. Writings cover topics such as African American voting rights and post-Reconstruction analysis. Overall, Hunter's writings provide historical sketches of important figures, events, and reprecussions with an emphasis on local history.

The Scrapbooks Series is made up of seventeen scrapbooks assembled by Hunter which contain clippings and other items concerning race relations and other social, political, and economic affairs pertaining to African Americans. They are composed principally of newspaper clippings published in North Carolina, but their scope is national as well as local. The clippings have been copied and arranged chronologically; the originals are closed to use.

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Chiefly family and professional correspondence, but also printed material, writings and speeches, scrapbooks, diaries, clippings, and photographs. The collection primarily pertains to the Farrar family and to Preston C. Farrar. Much of the Correspondence Series (1801-1976, undated) consists of personal letters among family members, especially written to Preston C. Farrar; his wife Edna P. Farrar; brother Samuel Clark Farrar, Jr.; sister Josephine; father Samuel Clark Farrar; and mother Ettie Farrar. However, the series also documents the careers in education of Samuel Farrar, Sr., and Preston Farrar. Business letters from Samuel Farrar concern real estate investments in Pennsylvania and New York that father and son owned jointly.

The Diaries Series (1887-1927, undated) includes diaries Preston C. Farrar kept while attending Washington and Jefferson College (1887-1891). The Writings and Speeches Series (1890-1925, undated) includes writings by Preston C. Farrar on teaching literature, English, and education. The Printed Material Series (1878-1957) includes drama and opera programs for New York City theaters, collected by Edith P. Farrar (1899-1957). The Photographs Series contains pictures and photograph albums primarily of family and friends (1888-1938, undated). The Scrapbooks and Clippings Series (1879-1945, undated) contains items that pertain to educational law and school operation; family events; local Allegheny elections; and world news, especially World War I. The Genealogy Series (1740-1984, undated) contains primarily correspondence, notes, and transcripts of wills relating to the Cooke/Cook family.