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Collection
The Equal Opportunity Office was created in 1972 by Chancellor John S. Blackburn to ensure University compliance with equal opportunity and affirmative action legislation. Collection contains material pertaining to the Office for Institutional Equity including Duke University's Affirmative Action plans, and promotional material as well as planning and committee material for the annual Martin Luther King Day Commemoration. Materials in the collection range in date from 1962-ongoing.

Collection contains material pertaining to the Office for Institutional Equity including Duke University's Affirmative Action plans, files relating to the Ivy League Plus Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity and Diversity Officers fall meeting held at Duke University, promotional material as well as planning and committee material for Martin Luther King Day Commemoration. Major subjects present include affirmation action, equal opportunity, Martin Luther King Jr., civil rights, minorities, and employment. Materials in the collection range in date from 1962-ongoing.

Collection

Robert M. Solow papers, 1951-2011 and undated 63.1 Linear Feet — 45,300 Items

Nobel Prize-winning economist and economics professor emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Robert M. Solow Papers span the years 1951-2011 and document the full scope of his professional, scholarly, and academic work. The majority of the collection consists of correspondence (1960-2011) with students, colleagues, and other economists, and it includes his reviews of papers by other scholars, referee reports, letters of recommendation, articles written for the public, professional correspondence as well as policy recommendations. The papers also contain lecture notes for courses Solow taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1972-1996); published papers by Solow on macroeconomics, growth theory, linear programming, and other topics (1950-2011); and files from economic, academic, and governmental organizations in which he served, including the American Economics Association and the Econometrics Society, and the Council of Economic Advisors to the White House. The collection is divided into the following series: Correspondence, Teaching Materials, Published Papers and Writings, Professional Service, and Audiovisual Materials.

The papers of Nobel Prize-winning economist Robert M. Solow span the years 1951-2011 and document his professional, scholarly, and academic work. The majority of the collection consists of voluminous files of correspondence (1960-2011) with students, colleagues, and other economists, and it includes his reviews of papers by other scholars, referee reports, letters of recommendation articles for the public, professional correspondence as well as policy recommendations. The papers also contain lecture notes for courses Solow taught at MIT (1972-1996); published papers by Solow on macroeconomics, growth theory, linear programming, and other topics (1950-2011); and files from economic, academic, and governmental organizations in which he served, including the American Economics Association, the National Bureau of Economic Research, and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. The published papers series also contains notes and rough drafts on topics such as econometrics, employment (specifically the theory of unemployment) and growth policies, macroeconomics, and the theory of capital. There is also some material on the Neo-classical Growth Model, also known as the Solow-Swan Growth Model (1956).

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series is subdivided into three groups: Chronological Correspondence, Alphabetical Correspondence, and Recommendations. The first two consist of correspondence from students, colleagues, and collaborators, with some responses from Solow included. The exchanges include economists such as Kenneth Arrow, Olivier Blanchard, Alan Blinder, Partha Dasgupta, Frank Hahn, Paul Samuelson, and James Tobin. The alphabetical correspondence dating from 1951-1976, is similar in content to the chronological correspondence but smaller in size; it also contains more pieces related to organizations and businesses. The Alphabetical Correspondence (Recommendations) dating from 1971-1986, is the smallest of the three and consists of requests for and the subsequent letters of recommendation from Solow for either students or professional economists.

The Teaching Materials Series houses the teaching materials generated from Solow's MIT economics courses (spanning an approximate 30 years of his 40 year MIT career) as well as the notes and materials used for lectures given at other forums and institutions. These materials consist of reading lists, syllabi, outlines, exams, problem sets and their solutions, homework, waivers, attendance rosters, assignments, spiral notebooks of economic equations, and personal preparatory notes handwritten by Solow.

Nearly all of Solow's major publications and co-publications (see bibliography for the few exceptions) are found in the Published Papers and Writings Series . These include his Ph.D. thesis, speeches, lectures, invited lectures, panel discussions, op-ed pieces, journal articles, brochures, pamphlets, reviews of his works and his responses to the reviews, Congressional testimony, and memorial tributes, as well as the rough drafts and notes for these documents.

The Professional Service Series includes varied documents associated with the groups Robert Solow was either a member of, held a position in, wrote pieces for, or supported. Files contain correspondence, meeting minutes, proposals, reports, publications, votes, elections, and financial reports. The largest organizations represented in this series are the American Economic Association and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.

Four videos featuring Solow are collected in the Audio Visual Series . Materials date from 2003 to 2009. Within the series, one item is recorded on a VHS cassette and the rest are in DVD format.

Collection

Robert W. Clower papers, 1920s-2000 and undated 20 Linear Feet — 11,250 items

The papers of economist Robert Clower consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999.

The Robert Clower Papers consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999. Clower's correspondence includes many prominent names of 20th century economics: Milton Friedman, John R. Hicks, Peter Howitt, Arjo Klamer, David Laidler, Axel Leijonhufvud, Don Patinkin, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, and others. Duke University faculty are represented in the Clower papers by Craufurd Goodwin, Neil DeMarchi, and Roy Weintraub. Also included are: Moses Abramowitz, Jess Benhabib, Clive Bull, David Colander, Paul Davidson, Frank Hahn, John Haltiwanger, Tom Hazlett, Roger Kormendi, Larry Kotlikoff, Robert Solow, and Sir Alan Walters. The Correspondence Series also includes a subseries of recommendation files. The collection also includes files of Clower's writings, ranging from notes and fragments to drafts and copies of published articles. Writings date from the 1950s through the 1990s. Topics covered in the collection include monetary theory, price theory, price determination, employment, banking, disequilibrium, stock-flow analysis, Keynesian economics/macroeconomics, Say's Law, and mathematical economics. The collection does not contain a complete set of drafts of Clower's writings. Many of the writings are untitled typescripts and fragments of notes.

The collection includes writings from Clower's father, F.W. (Fay Walter) Clower, also an economist; two copies of John Maynard Keynes's The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money, annotated by Clower; 5 cassette tapes with dictated letters; teaching materials from several economics classes taught by Clower throughout his career; and legal transcripts of 1979 court cases and hearings in which Clower testified.