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Axel Leijonhufvud papers, 1953-1980 and undated 4.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 3,000 Items

Swedish economist, currently professor emeritus at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and professor at the University of Trento, Italy. The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud date from 1953-1980 and consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory, especially as it pertains to finance; instability and disequilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general. A few items are in Swedish.

The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory; instability and (dis)equilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general.

The Correspondence Series includes communications from notable individuals such as Armen Alchian, Robert W. Clower (co-author), Robert Dorfman, Alan G. Gowman, Bert Hoselitz, Erik Lundberg, Gunnar Myrdal, and Joan Robinson. A few items are in Swedish. The Writings and Research Series includes Leijonhufvud's master's thesis and notes, doctoral dissertation and related research, and a variety of graduate papers in addition to drafts and published pieces; there are six subseries - Axel Leijonhufvud Writings, Class Lecture Notes, Dissertation, Graduate Work, Research and Notes, and Writings by Others. Within the latter there is a sizeable amount of unpublished and later-published manuscripts by Joan Robinson, fellow economist and close colleague.

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Herbert Scarf papers, 1951-2015 33 Linear Feet — 22 boxes — .684 Megabytes — 3 floppy disks with 11 files (one disk unreadable)

Herbert Scarf (1930-2015) was an economist and mathematician, and worked as a professor of economics at Yale University and the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings, as well as his collaborations and professional affiliations across the fields of economics, mathematics, and operations research. Includes a small group of electronic files; computations and other technical data contained in these files may be available in the form of printouts in the collection's research files. Acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive at Duke University.

The Herbert Scarf Papers document his career as an economist and mathematician. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the computation of economic equilibrium and fixed points, stability of general equilibrium, the core of many-person games and its relation to general equilibrium, integer programming, and problems of production with indivisibilities. Much of Scarf's work serves as the basis for applied general equilibrium models, and as a precursor to modern computational and simulation approaches to economics.

The collection also documents Scarf's collaboration and communications with prominent economists and mathematicians such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, Ralph Gomory, Terje Hansen, Werner Hildenbrand, Tjalling Koopmans, Harold Kuhn, Lloyd Shapley, John Shoven, Martin Shubik, John Whalley, and many others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Scarf's leadership roles in the American Economic Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and other organizations; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions in the economics, operations research, and applied mathematics programs at Yale University.

Includes a small group of electronic files originally on floppy disks created in the 1980s, which have been migrated to a library server. Computations and other technical data contained in these files may be available in the form of printouts in the collection's research files.

Acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive at Duke University.

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Roy Radner papers, 1951-2014 36 Linear Feet — 0.0028 Gigabytes

Roy Radner (1927- ) is an economic theorist and professor who has researched and taught at University of California at Berkeley, the Cowles Commission, AT&T Bell Lab, and New York University. His archival collection includes his published writings, drafts, collaborations, correspondence, and teaching materials spanning the length of his career.

The Roy Radner Papers contain 6 series. The series "Writings" (1951-2013) includes Radner's published and unpublished papers, with various materials related to them (e.g., correspondence with editors and colleagues, multiple drafts with hand-written notes, hand-written sheets of mathematical developments etc.). The series "Correspondence" (1954-2014) includes his correspondence sorted by individuals' names. Files include correspondence with and about, or only about, the individual named on a given file. There is also a set of personal files. Due to the large number of recommendation letters and other personnel-related content of the Correspondence series, this portion of the collection is restricted until 2050. The series "Teaching" (1967-2012) contains materials related to his teaching activity (e.g., syllabus, reading lists and packets, exercises with solutions). The bulk of it is largely from the Stern School (New York University) from the late 1990s to the early 2010s. The series "Research Activities" (1962-2014) includes materials about activities such as seminars, workshops, study groups and the like. Finally, the series "Writings by Others" (1954-2006) contains materials written by other researchers, with or (in most cases) without notes from Radner. There are no specific connections among the series to be noted, except the fact that, by virtue of their thematic organizations, one can find academic and administrative letters in all the series, i.e., not only in "Correspondence."

Collection contains electronic records that must be requested and accessed in our reading room. Contact Research Services with questions.

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Lionel W. McKenzie papers, 1942-2004 and undated 22 Linear Feet — 16,500 Items

Lionel McKenzie (1919-2010) was an economist whose main areas of research were general equilbrium theory and turnpike theory. McKenzie began his career as an assistant professor at Duke University from 1948 to 1957 before becoming chairman of the Economics Department at the University of Rochester in 1957, where he taught until his retirement in 1989. McKenzie also served on a number of prominent international economic organizations, where he helped to further the discourse in the discipline. Collection contains correspondence, writings, research notes, and other written material from throughout McKenzie's career. The papers span the years 1942-2004 and document his work as an economic theorist and educator.

The Lionel W. McKenzie Papers span the years 1942 to 2004, with the bulk of the material dating from 1960 to 1990. Through correspondence, research notes, article drafts, teaching material, lectures, and published materials, the collection provides a broad overview of his professional career. McKenzie's greatest contribution to economics has been through his work in conjunction with Kenneth Arrow and Gerard Debreu on general equilibrium, and his writings on capital theory and turnpike theory, all of which are documented in a variety of forms throughout the collection. Significant correspondents include noted economists Paul Samuelson, Tjalling Koopmans, and Robert Solow. Other aspects of his career are documented, such as his involvement in a number of economic organizations, especially the Econometric Society and the Mathematical Social Sciences Board; his role as organizer of a number of academic conferences, such as the Value and Capital Conference of 1988; and his teaching career at Duke University from 1948 to 1957 and at the University of Rochester from 1957 to 1989. The papers are organized into the following series: Conferences; Correspondence; Course Materials; Organizations; Personal Files; and Research and Writings.

The Conferences Series includes material from conferences McKenzie attended and organized throughout his career and includes copies of programs, articles given, and other related documents. The Correspondence Series, the largest of the collection, contains largely official and routine correspondence, but also includes a sizeable number of letters on intellectual topics. The Research and Writings Series, the second largest, has various drafts and iterations of most of McKenzie's published work as well as some unpublished material. Many of the notes contain complicated mathematical notations documenting the theoretical foundations for his work. A small set of writings by others, chiefly on game theory and convex sets, conclude the series. The Course Materials Series houses syllabi and other materials from the seminars he taught, including many versions of the handwritten text for his general equilibrium seminar, documenting his teaching methods as well as the evolution in his thinking on the subject. In the Organizations Series, extensive documentation can be found of McKenzie's involvement with various economic organizations, including internal discussions on the workings of many of these groups. The smallest group of records, the Personal Files Series, contains curriculum vitae, personal correspondence, and other ephemera.

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Martin Shubik is Professor Emeritus of Economics and Seymour H. Knox Professor of Mathematical Institutional Economics at Yale University and the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. The Martin Shubik Papers span the years 1938 through 2017, and consist of his correspondence, research, writings, and his collaborations and professional affiliations.

The Martin Shubik Papers document his career as an economist. This collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on general equilibrium, game theory, the core, oligopoly and market structure, defense and war game analysis, nuclear deterrence, behavior and risk, financial institutions, and money.

The collection also documents his collaborations and communications with prominent economists, including Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, Milton Friedman, Oskar Morgenstern, John Nash, Paul Samuelson, Herbert Scarf, Lloyd Shapley, and others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Shubik's time at IBM, his consultancy work for the RAND Corporation, expert witness testimony, his role as a conference organizer and participant, and other professional activities; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Yale University.

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E. Roy Weintraub papers, 1930-2019 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — 1.1 Gigabytes

E. Roy Weintraub (b.1943) is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Duke University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings.

The E. Roy Weintraub Papers document his career as a historian of economics and mathematics, and professor at Duke University. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the history of economics, role in the community of history of economics scholars, and as a faculty member and administrator at Duke.

The collection also documents his communications with prominent economists as research subjects such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, and Lionel McKenzie. Included in Weintraub's communications are exchanges with prominent figures in the history of economics and related communities of scholars such as Roger Backhouse, Bradley Bateman, Anthony Brewer, Arjo Klamer, Mary Morgan, Deirdre McCloskey, and Philip Mirowski.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Weintraub's roles at in the History of Economics Society, at Duke University, and as an editor of History of Political Economy.

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Kenneth J. Arrow papers, 1921-2017 142 Linear Feet — 94 boxes — 13.2 Gigabytes

Kenneth Arrow (1921-2017) was a Nobel Prize-winning economist and a professor of economics at Stanford University and Harvard University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, and other materials documenting his political and personal interests, as well as his collaborations and professional affiliations across the fields of economics, mathematics, public policy, and international relations.

The Kenneth Arrow Papers document his career as an economist, professor, and Nobel Laureate. The collection provides an overview of his many professional activities, along with his research, writings, and collected notes regarding topics such as microeconomics, contingent valuation, social choice theory, general equilibrium analysis, the economics of information, climate change, and endogenous-growth theories. The collection also documents his collaboration and communications with prominent economists such as Robert Aumann, Gerard Debreu, Frank Hahn, John Harsanyi, Leonid Hurwicz, Harold Hotelling, Tjalling Koopmans, Alain Lewis, Lionel McKenzie, Roy Radner, Martin Shubik, Herbert Simon, Robert Solow, and many others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Arrow's role as an expert witness during various legal cases involving anti-trust lawsuits, international trade, and public utilities; his professional consulting work for different groups and organizations; his political activism supporting different human rights organizations, including his involvement in agencies promoting peace in the Middle East, environmental regulation, arms reduction, and nuclear testing bans; his itineraries, lectures, and public engagements; administrative activities for various professional associations and conferences, including his leadership roles in the American Economic Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Beijer Institute, the Econometric Society, the International Economic Association, the Office of Naval Research, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Science, the National Bureau of Economic Research, and many more; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions in the Economics Departments of Stanford University, Harvard University, and the Santa Fe Institute. The collection also contains personal artifacts and documents from Arrow's childhood and early education; awards and honorary degrees, including the Clark Medal, the National Medal of Science, and materials from the Nobel Prize ceremony; assorted books from his personal library; various foreign editions of his published works, in multiple languages; and born-digital records with his email and other working documents.

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Robert W. Clower papers, 1920s-2000 and undated 20 Linear Feet — 11,250 items

The papers of economist Robert Clower consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999.

The Robert Clower Papers consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999. Clower's correspondence includes many prominent names of 20th century economics: Milton Friedman, John R. Hicks, Peter Howitt, Arjo Klamer, David Laidler, Axel Leijonhufvud, Don Patinkin, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, and others. Duke University faculty are represented in the Clower papers by Craufurd Goodwin, Neil DeMarchi, and Roy Weintraub. Also included are: Moses Abramowitz, Jess Benhabib, Clive Bull, David Colander, Paul Davidson, Frank Hahn, John Haltiwanger, Tom Hazlett, Roger Kormendi, Larry Kotlikoff, Robert Solow, and Sir Alan Walters. The Correspondence Series also includes a subseries of recommendation files. The collection also includes files of Clower's writings, ranging from notes and fragments to drafts and copies of published articles. Writings date from the 1950s through the 1990s. Topics covered in the collection include monetary theory, price theory, price determination, employment, banking, disequilibrium, stock-flow analysis, Keynesian economics/macroeconomics, Say's Law, and mathematical economics. The collection does not contain a complete set of drafts of Clower's writings. Many of the writings are untitled typescripts and fragments of notes.

The collection includes writings from Clower's father, F.W. (Fay Walter) Clower, also an economist; two copies of John Maynard Keynes's The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money, annotated by Clower; 5 cassette tapes with dictated letters; teaching materials from several economics classes taught by Clower throughout his career; and legal transcripts of 1979 court cases and hearings in which Clower testified.

The Robert Clower Papers consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999. Clower's correspondence includes many prominent names of 20th century economics: Milton Friedman, John R. Hicks, Peter Howitt, Arjo Klamer, David Laidler, Axel Leijonhufvud, Don Patinkin, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, and others. Duke University faculty are represented in the Clower papers by Craufurd Goodwin, Neil DeMarchi, and Roy Weintraub. Also included are: Moses Abramowitz, Jess Benhabib, Clive Bull, David Colander, Paul Davidson, Frank Hahn, John Haltiwanger, Tom Hazlett, Roger Kormendi, Larry Kotlikoff, Robert Solow, and Sir Alan Walters. The Correspondence Series also includes a subseries of recommendation files. The collection also includes files of Clower's writings, ranging from notes and fragments to drafts and copies of published articles. Writings date from the 1950s through the 1990s. Topics covered in the collection include monetary theory, price theory, price determination, employment, banking, disequilibrium, stock-flow analysis, Keynesian economics/macroeconomics, Say's Law, and mathematical economics. The collection does not contain a complete set of drafts of Clower's writings. Many of the writings are untitled typescripts and fragments of notes.

The collection includes writings from Clower's father, F.W. (Fay Walter) Clower, also an economist; two copies of John Maynard Keynes's The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money, annotated by Clower; 5 cassette tapes with dictated letters; teaching materials from several economics classes taught by Clower throughout his career; and legal transcripts of 1979 court cases and hearings in which Clower testified.

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Leonid Hurwicz papers, 1911-2008 and undated 150 Linear Feet — Approx. 200,000 Items

Leonid Hurwicz (1917-2008) was Regents' Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Minnesota and recipient of the 2007 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science for his work on mechanism design. The bulk of the Leonid Hurwicz papers span the years 1930-2008, covering his entire career as an economist, from his early work in the 1940s and 1950s at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the University of Chicago, and the Cowles Commission, until his death in 2008. The collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials, Professional Service, Research and Writings (about 70% of the collection), and Teaching Materials. Though there are correspondence, legal, financial, and other papers relating to Hurwicz's forced migration to the United States, there have been no items discovered documenting his training as an economist at the University of Warsaw or at the London School of Economics in the 1930s. The majority of the collection focuses on Hurwicz's work after 1970, most notably his collaborations with Stanley Reiter, Kenneth Arrow, Don Saari, Thomas Marschak and Marcel Richter.

The bulk of the Leonid Hurwicz Papers span the years 1930-2008, covering his entire career as an economist in the United States, from his early work at MIT, the University of Chicago and the Cowles Commission until his death while Emeritus Professor at the University of Minnesota. The collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials, Professional Service Series, Research and Writings, and Teaching Materials. Though there are correspondence, legal, financial, and other papers documenting his migration to the United States, there have been no items discovered that document his training as an economist at the University of Warsaw or at the London School of Economics. The majority of the collection focuses on Hurwicz's work after 1970, most notably his collaborations with Stanley Reiter, Kenneth Arrow, Don Saari, Thomas Marschak and Marcel Richter.

Though there is a significant amount of personal and professional correspondence, the majority of the papers reside in the 142 boxes of the Research and Writings Series, which contains extensive files of Hurwicz's research notes, reprints, and revisions of working papers by Hurwicz and others with added annotations. The research files document important developments in postwar mathematical economics and Hurwicz's seminal contributions to this field of study.

Recurring subjects in Research and Writings include Cowles-style econometrics; the stability of general equilibrium; the integrability of demand functions; the study of monopolies and oligopolies, as well as socialized systems; decision-making under ambiguity; the second welfare theorem; the applications of game theory to economic, social and political issues; and the development of mechanism design, for which Hurwicz was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2007. With his theories on mechanism design (including the notion of incentive-compatibility), Hurwicz analyzed the functioning of institutions and communication systems such as banking, auctions, and privatized markets, and compared political systems such as socialism and capitalism.

In addition to documenting Hurwicz's work in theoretical economics, the collection also follows his professional activities at the University of Minnesota, both as a teacher and as an active member of the Economics Department, his participation on various committees, and his work with institutions such as the Cowles Commission, RAND corporation, the National Science Foundation, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Also in evidence is Hurwicz's interest in the development of foreign economies, with an emphasis on East Asia, Russia, and Eastern Europe. His numerous travels and presentations during his career as well as his continuous relations with European and Asian economists are documented chiefly in the Professional Service Series. Finally, the Printed Materials Series as well as the Research and Writings Series offer a significant amount of works by others documenting the development of recent economics. Many are heavily annotated by Hurwicz.

Electronic files which were readable have been transferred to the electronic records server. They consist chiefly of word processing documents containing drafts of Informational Efficiency, which Hurwicz co-authored with Reiter in the late 1990s. A use copy of original electronic files must be made before contents can be accessed; please contact Research Services before coming to use this material.

Detailed descriptions on the arrangement and content of each series can be found in the respective sections in this collection guide.

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Edward H. Chamberlin (1899-1967) was an economist and professor at Harvard University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, and items of a personal nature.

The Edward H. Chamberlin papers document his career as an economist and professor. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on topics such as monopolistic competition, market structure, pricing behavior, economies of scale, and collective bargaining, among others. The collection also documents his correspondence with prominent economists and individuals such as Marice Allais, Luigi Einaudi, Dwight Eisenhower, Howard S. Ellis, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Gottfried Haberler, Frank Hahn, Roy Harrod, Friedrich A. Hayek, Richard Kahn, Nicholas Kaldor, Frank Knight, Emil Lederer, Wassily Leontief, Abba Lerner, Gertrud Lovasy, Fritz Machlup, Hans Neisser, J. F. Normano, Francois Perroux, Dennis H. Robertson, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, Thomas Schelling, Robert Schuman, Joseph Schumpeter, Ben Seligman, George Stigler, Frank Taussig, Gerhard Tintner, Jaroslav Vanek, Jacob Viner, and many others.

Along with his scholarship and writings, the collection documents Chamberlin's roles in the American Economic Association, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Council of Economic Advisers, and the Rockefeller Foundation project to aid refugee scholars fleeing Europe during the 1930s; his editorship of the Quarterly Journal of Economics; his speaking engagements; expert testimony in legal proceedings and before houses of the United States Congress; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Harvard. The collection also contains personal artifacts documenting Chamberlin's service in the National Guard during World War 1, his service as a member of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War 2, as well as awards and honorary degrees.