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Angela M. Jeannet papers, 1969-1983 4.5 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

Collection documents the activities of one of the earliest local women's liberation groups, started during the second wave of feminism, and co-founded by Jeannet. Included are clippings and a number of publications (volumes, pamphlets, newsletters, and other periodicals) relative to the movement, including newsletters from the Lancaster Women's Liberation Women's Center. Topics discussed include sexual harassment, the Equal Rights Amendment, the pro-choice movement, campus activism, women and work, and the National Organization for Women. Other materials document the inner workings and activities of Jeannet and the group, such as correspondence and meeting minutes. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Bobbye Ortiz was a social activist and Marxist feminist. The collection consists chiefly of personal correspondence; extensive subject files on international political and cultural movements; photographs and slides; ephemeral publication material such as grassroots newsletters, pamphlets, broadsides, and clippings; cultural artifacts, including buttons and T-shirts; and over 300 sound recordings of spoken voice and music (see separate catalog record for sound recordings). The collection documents the personal life and career of an international feminist, Marxist activist, and mother, who also served as editor of the magazine Monthly Review and was the founder of the organization WIRE (Women's International Resource Exchange). English.

The papers of feminist and social activist Bobbye Ortiz span from the years 1919 to 1993, with most of the papers being dated between 1950 and 1990. The papers consist chiefly of personal correspondence; extensive subject files on international political and cultural movements; photographs and slides; ephemeral publication material such as grassroots newsletters, pamphlets, broadsides, and clippings; cultural artifacts, including buttons and T-shirts; and over 300 sound recordings of spoken voice and music. The collection documents the personal life and career of an international feminist, Marxist activist, and mother, who also served as editor of the magazine Monthly Review and was the founder of the organization WIRE (Women's International Resource Exchange). Other personal documents and subject files concern the activities of Bobbye's daughter, Viki Ortiz, an activist in her own right. The materials in both women's files are especially rich in the history of the international women's liberation movement and other revolutionary movements in Europe, Latin America, and other countries during the sixties, seventies, and eighties. Many of these materials focus on politics and government in Cuba, China, and France. Other topics include Vietnam War protests; students' movements, particularly Paris, 1968; indigenous women's movements in Latin America; AIDS activism; sexual health; adoption rights; gay and lesbian parenting; and women's issues such as reproductive rights, economic status, and violence against women.

The Correspondence Series is almost completely CLOSED to research; see the inventory below for more information. Most materials in other series, however, are open for research.

The Personal Files Series focuses on Ortiz's formal education, particularly her coursework at New York University. Other highlights of the series include Ortiz's scrapbook from her tour of China, which is further documented by audio tapes and photographs in the collection. Writings folders include notes, short articles, and speeches written by Ortiz as well as a collection of poetry by Grace Goldin, a friend of Ortiz. Two folders contain photocopies of inscriptions from many authors found inside the volumes in her personal library (now in the Perkins Library stacks of Duke University). This series is partially CLOSED.

The Subject Files Series has been separated into two main subseries: one devoted to international women's liberation and one for general topics. In the International Women's Liberation Subseries, Ortiz maintained extensive files on the status of women and women's liberation campaigns around the world. The grassroots organizational publications (many of them ephemeral in nature), news clippings, and articles found in the international women's liberation subseries address such issues as women's economic status, their roles in the family, violence against women, reproductive rights and sexuality, and indigenous women's movements. The most extensive segments of the subseries deal with women's liberation in the 1970s and 1980s in Chile, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, and the United States. The subseries is organized alphabetically by country.

The General Files Subseries consists mainly of articles, notes, and periodicals from the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. Especially noteworthy are notes and other papers related to Ortiz's work as associate editor of the Monthly Review, though these provide only a limited glimpse into her decades of service there. The subseries also contains materials related to health, cancer, and the right-to-die movement; feminism, women's liberation, and the Women's International Resource Exchange (WIRE); and the political turmoil of Paris 1968. Together, Ortiz's subject files reflect the directions of her activism in the final decades of her life.

The Photographs and Slides Series contains portraits of individuals and groups, photographs taken during tours of countries and political events, and miscellaneous casual snapshots. There are very fine portraits of native peoples taken by well-known activist Gertrude Duby Blom. The largest segment of the series documents Ortiz's trips to China in 1974 and Latin America (ca. 1984). For related materials, see the Audio Tapes Series and the Personal Files Series. There are also audio cassettes recorded in Latin America and Nicaragua, which may correspond with slides in the Photographs and Slides Series. This series ends with photo negatives of an International Women's Day March in 1978. Note: This series is restricted. Use copies must be made of any cassettes without use copies already made. Please consult with reference staff.

Posters, buttons, and T-shirts bearing slogans and vivid images were vital components of the many social movements in which both Bobbye and Victoria Ortiz participated. The Cultural Artifacts Series captures the political use of popular culture in the late 20th century by preserving a representative sample of these cultural artifacts. The selections reflect Bobbye and Viki's participation in social movements concerned with issues such as U.S. imperialism in Latin America, international women's liberation, AIDS, and lesbian and gay rights. The series also contains original artwork done for Bobbye and Viki, as well as art posters from France. Several oversize posters are artifacts from the French worker/student strikes of 1968.

The majority of tapes in the Audio Tapes Series are cassette recordings of tours taken by Bobbye Ortiz during her travels in China and Latin America. Additional tapes include recordings of radio programs, interviews, and readings related to Bobbye's activism. Descriptive notes on many of the tapes listed below have been included as an appendix to this inventory. Note: This series is restricted. Use copies must be made of any cassettes without use copies already made. Please consult with reference staff. Related material about these trips may also be found in the Photographs and Slides Series and Personal Files Series.

The complete holdings of Bobbye Ortiz's library, which were donated as part of this collection and reside in Perkins Library at Duke University, are represented by the hand-written Index Card Catalog Series. The hundreds of Monthly Review Press publications in the library are one of the few records in the Ortiz Collection of her work for over twenty years as associate editor of the Monthly Review. The range of topics covered by her library -- women, Marxism and socialism, literature, Central America, Latin America, Asia, social sciences, humanities -- reveals the breadth of her intellectual interests and their intimate connections to her political concerns. The catalog is organized by topic, alphabetically by author therein.

The Phonograph Records Series features sound recordings on 33 1/3, 45, and 78 LPs collected by Bobbye Ortiz during her travels. Hundreds of folk music recordings, protest and labor song collections, and miscellaneous spoken word recordings date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Recording artists include many well-known musicians as well as hundreds of other musicians interested in folk, labor, and protest music; major languages represented include Spanish, French, and Italian. Many of these recordings are now out of print and difficult to find. This series is restricted: use copies must be made in order to access the recordings. For assistance, please contact the reference staff.

The addition (Acc.# 2003-0065) consists largely of photographs and negatives (approximately 550 prints, 120 negatives, and 1 slide, color and black-and-white), documenting Ortiz's travels to various locations including Cuba, Nicaragua, China, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, and Europe (1968-[1980s]). Also included are publication files related to WIRE (Women's International Resource Exchange), a few pieces of correspondence, and other miscellaneous personal items. Boxes 2 and 3, containing photographs, correspondence, and personal items, are CLOSED to research. Box 1 is open to research. No container list was created for this accession.

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Elizabeth Grosz papers, 1973-2016 13.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes

Professional papers of Elizabeth Grosz, professor in the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies Department at Duke University. Materials include her scholarly work, teaching files, and her students' work.

Professional papers of feminist philosopher, Elizabeth (Liz) Grosz: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Grosz. Materials encompass her scholarly work, including research files, manuscripts and typescripts of writings, publications, as well as student work, teaching files including syllabi, lecture notes, etc., and ephemera.

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Jill Over papers, 1966-2011 6.5 Linear Feet — 3500 Items

Feminist and social activist: involved in anti-war movement, abortion rights campaigns, youth and adolescent sex education, and pro-democracy movements in Latin America and Africa. Collection includes publications and research files related to human rights, social justice activism, and peace in Latin America and the United States; as well as ephemera, pamphlets, periodicals, and clippings related to youth liberation, sex education, reproductive health, and feminism, especially during the 1970s and 1980s. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Human Rights Archive (Duke University).

Collection includes publications and research files related to human rights, social justice activism, and peace in Latin America and the United States; as well as ephemera, pamphlets, periodicals, and clippings related to youth liberation, sex education, reproductive health, and feminism, primarily dating from the 1970s and 1980s.

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Julie LaValle Jones papers, 1970-1998 4.8 Linear Feet — 3600 items

Julie LaValle Jones was a feminist who worked to prevent domestic violence in the Washington, D.C. area. Accession (2008-0029) (3600 items; 4.8 lin. ft.; dated 1970-1998, bulk 1973-1982) includes speeches, essays, pamphlets and other feminist publications (e.g. newspapers and journals), administrative files of all the feminist organizations Jones founded or worked with, conference files, project files, subject files, correspondence, and ephemera (including four posters and two audiocassettes). Some of the organizations represented include the YWCA, My Sister's Place, the Women's Legal Defense Fund's Task Force on Abused Women, and the Feminist Alliance Against Rape. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2008-0029) (3600 items; 4.8 lin. ft.; dated 1970-1998, bulk 1973-1982) includes speeches, essays, pamphlets and other feminist publications (e.g. newspapers and journals), administrative files of all the feminist organizations Jones founded or worked with, conference files, project files, subject files, correspondence, and ephemera (including posters and audiocassettes). Some of the organizations represented include the YWCA, My Sister's Place, the Women's Legal Defense Fund's Task Force on Abused Women, and the Feminist Alliance Against Rape. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Nancy Blood papers, 1967-1977 1.5 Linear Feet — 750 items

Nancy Blood is a retired Durham County Public Libraries librarian and is also a feminist and LGBT rights activist. Accession (2009-0101) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1967-1977 and undated) consists of a subject file of printed materials discussing women's health, employment, art, feminism, academics, law, motherhood, etc. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0101) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1967-1977 and undated) consists of a subject file of printed materials discussing women's health, employment, art, feminism, academics, law, motherhood, etc. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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A non-profit organization, located in Durham, N.C., founded in 1977 for the purpose of providing support for women in ministry, persons of faith working for justice in the South, and religious organizations that address women's needs. The records are relevant to the study of the relationships among religion, politics, and society, particularly how women in ministry have confronted a number of social issues facing the South. Information pertaining to the Equal Rights Amendment, sexism, economic justice and poverty, gays and lesbians in the Church, feminism, abortion, racism, and rural ministry is included. Also includes materials on retreats and conferences, some organized by the Resource Center, which focused on many of the issues above and other concerns, including gender and language, spirituality, medical care, housing and homelessness, women in ministry, and women in the workplace.

The records of the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South span the years 1939 to 2018 with the bulk occurring from 1977 to 1990. The Resource Center's mission of working for justice in the South as well as its operations are reflected in the records, which primarily consist of printed material, correspondence, writings, clippings, account books, grant proposals, minutes, newsletters, photographs, audio tapes, filmstrips, and videocassette tapes.

The Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South Records are especially relevant to the study of the relationships among religion, politics and society. In particular they document how women, especially women in ministry, have confronted a number of social issues facing the South as well as the entire United States. Information pertaining to the Equal Rights Amendment, sexism, feminism, economic justice and poverty, gays and lesbians in the Church, Central America, child abuse, abortion and the abortion controversy, racism, and rural ministry is included in the records. Information on these issues as well as others is contained in the Alphabetical Files and Printed Material series. Retreats and conferences, some organized by the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South, which focus on many of the above issues as well as other concerns, including gender and language, spirituality, housing and homelessness, women in ministry, health and medical care, and women in the workplace are reflected in the Alphabetical Files, Audiovisual, and Pictures series. Many of these retreats and conferences were held in North Carolina and Virginia. In the Printed Material Series, are copies of South of the Garden, a newsletter published by the Resource Center, resource packets pertaining to sexism and ministries to women in crisis among other subjects, and a number of religious newsletters that focus on women in the Church.

The records reflect the ecumenical vision of the Resource Center in that the major Protestant denominations are represented in the records. Within these denominations, women's organizations are the primary focus, including the Presbyterian Committee on Women's Concerns, the National Association of Presbyterian Clergy Women, and the United Church of Christ Clergywomen's Conference. Other religious bodies and organizations reflected in the records include the North Carolina Council of Churches - Committee for ERA, Religious Coalition for Abortion Rights, and programs for women at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Material pertaining to these organizations are primarily located in the Alphabetical Files; Financial Papers; Meetings, Conferences, and Workshops; and Printed Material series.

Significant individuals reflected in the records, primarily within the Audiovisual Series, include Rosemary Radford Ruether, Anne Wilson Schaef, Katie Cannon, and Carter Heyward. The correspondence, writings, sermons and addresses, and notes of Jeanette Stokes, Director of the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South, are chiefly contained in the Financial Papers; Meetings, Conferences, and Workshops; and Audiovisual series. Documents concerning the operations and history of the Resource Center, including account books, grant proposals, and incorporation materials are primarily located in the Financial Papers and Miscellaneous Series.

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Rosetta Reitz papers, 1929-2008 41 Linear Feet — 30,750 Items

Rosetta Reitz (1924-2008) was a business owner, stock broker, university lecturer, and writer on issues including food, feminism, women's health, and female jazz and blues musicians. She was also the founder and owner of Rosetta Records, a company most prominent in the 1980s that was dedicated to re-releasing historic recordings by female jazz and blues musicians. The Rosetta Reitz Papers address aspects of the entirety of Reitz's career, with the majority related to Rosetta Records and to Reitz's associated music research since the 1970s. The collection contains company documents, research notes, manuscripts, correspondence, newspaper clippings, photocopies, photographs, a variety of audio and moving image formats, as well as magazines and books.

The Rosetta Reitz Papers span the dates 1929-2008, with the bulk of the material covering the period of the late 1970s through the 2000s. While the collection addresses aspects of the entirety of her career, the vast majority is related to Rosetta Records and Reitz's related music research. The collection is divided into eight series: Biographical Information, Rosetta Records Business Files, Presentations, Writings, Photographs, Posters, Audio and Moving Images, and Reference Materials.

The Biographical Information Series contains published and unpublished writings, correspondence, resume materials, and scrapbooks by and about Rosetta Reitz.

The Rosetta Records Business Files Series contains materials related to the founding of Rosetta Records in 1979 and its daily operations in the decades that followed, which primarily focus on the design and production of the company's catalog releases. Also of note are the files related to Reitz's involvement with Greta Schiller and Andrea Weiss in creating a documentary film on the International Sweethearts of Rhythm.

Print materials related to the many concerts, lectures, presentations, and courses that Reitz produced and/or taught on jazz, the blues, and other topics are found in the Presentations Series. Of note are the files related to Reitz's numerous presentations of "Shouters and Wailers", which was an evolving film-based lecture that Reitz delivered throughout the U.S. as well as overseas, that focused on female jazz and blues musicians.

The Writings Series contains manuscript drafts, research notes, and other materials related to Reitz's written works on food, feminism and women's health, and female jazz and blues musicians, including writing related to her grassroots advocacy for the creation of a US postage stamp honoring Bessie Smith.

The Photographs Series primarily contains 8x10 publicity photographs of various jazz and blues musicians, along with other candid photographs from Reitz's life and career.

Oversize promotional materials, primarily related to Reitz's film-based "Shouters and Wailers" presentations, but also related to individual female jazz and blues musicians, are located in the Posters Series.

The Audio and Moving Image Series contains all of the commercial releases by Rosetta Records in cassette, LP, and/or CD formats, including recordings featuring Ida Cox, Dorothy Donegan, Lil Green, the International Sweethearts of Rhythm, Valaida Snow, Rosetta Tharpe, Dinah Washington, Ethel Waters, Mae West, Georgia White, and others. It also contains audio recordings of the "Blues is a Woman" concerts, hosted by Carmen McRae, that Reitz produced for the Kool Jazz Festival and the Newport Jazz Festival in the early 1980s. Also a part of the series are VHS and 16mm film of musical performances by female jazz and blues musicians that originally aired on television and that Reitz compiled as a part of her ongoing research. Original audio and moving image materials are closed to listening and viewing. However, researchers can access the original artifacts for the purpose of reading liner notes and carrying out other text-based studies. Scanned images of all LP covers and liner notes are available in JPEG format on DVD 1 in Box 58. CD or DVD use copies, which are open to patron use, are available for some items and are noted below. Unless otherwise noted, use copies must be made for access to audio and moving image content.

The Reference Materials Series contains newspaper clippings, magazines, and books, primarily related to jazz and the blues, that Reitz drew upon in the course of her ongoing research and writing.

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Third Wave Foundation records, 1992-2011 3.5 Linear Feet — 2600 Items

Feminist activist organization that works nationally to support young women and transgender youth. Collection includes administrative files, fundraising materials, grant partner information, photographs, clippings, and conference materials. Also includes restricted electronic information. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes some administrative files, grant materials, research, fundraising, and conference files from the duration of Third Wave's existence, with the majority of files dating 1997-2006. Also includes photographs and clippings collected by Third Wave documenting various events and activities. Some materials are restricted, including board meeting minutes, electronic records, and audiovisual tapes. Please contact Research Services before visiting the library to use this collection.

Collection acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Victoria Ortiz papers, 1923-1999 and undated, bulk 1960-1990 12.2 Linear Feet — 19.0 linear feet; approx. 14,999 Items

The Victoria Ortiz Papers span the years 1923 to 1999, with the majority of the papers dating from 1960 to 1990. The main collection (2003-0204) comprises materials separated from the Bobbye S. Ortiz Papers and consists of one series; the accession number 2003-0204 was assigned to this grouping. Viki Ortiz's political and intellectual interests can be gleaned from the topics in the Victoria Ortiz Subject Files Series, which has been divided into seven subseries to facilitate its use. The first three subseries contain newspaper and magazine articles, organizational materials, photographs, pamphlets, speeches, and reports related to Cuba, Mexico, and Latin America. Scholars of U.S. anticommunism and student movements in the 1960s may find of interest materials related to Ortiz's 1963 trip to Cuba, taken with 58 other college students in defiance of U.S. policy. Each subseries is organized alphabetically by topic or title.

The parallels and differences between Viki's and Bobbye's political interests are reflected in their subject files. Both maintained extensive collections of materials on international women's liberation; like her mother, Viki was most interested in the status of women in Latin American nations. Yet while they shared similar social values and political beliefs, Viki's interests often diverged from her mother's. Viki's general files reflect her involvement in International Year of the Woman activities and her interest in population control, as well as her interest in such topics as reproductive rights, family structure, and economic justice.

Viki's great interest in adoption and parenting grew out of her own experiences as a single adoptive parent of a Mexican-born child. The subseries on adoption and parenting includes newsletters and publications of organizations for single parents; research for a book on single adoptive parenting; and miscellaneous clippings, notes, and other materials on issues such as adoptive parenting, international adoption, and gay/lesbian parenting. These materials are arranged alphabetically by topic or title.

The final subseries contains Viki's extensive notes and other materials related to literature. This subseries is organized into coursework, general literature, and Latin American literature, and is arranged alphabetically therein.

The addition (2003-0066) consists primarily of professional and subject files documenting Ortiz's law career, writings, and feminist and social activism. Her work on the literature and women's issues of Latin America are particularly well-represented. Portions of this addition are closed to use until 2050.

Addition (05-024) (3759 items, 7.7 lin. ft.; dated 1923-1997 and n.d) comprises research materials pertaining to gender, women, and the law; artist Elizabeth Catlett; and experimentation with LSD by the U.S. military. Includes family documents about Camilo, Ortiz's adopted son; teaching materials; files from CUNY law school; correspondence, appointment calendars; videotapes; travel diaries; photographs, printed material; and ephemera. This addition is closed to use until 2050.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.