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Alexander Proctor papers, 1837-1895 0.1 Linear Feet — 36 Items

African American family originally from Virginia and North Carolina. Legal papers and correspondence relating to the Alexander Proctor family, tracing their history beginning as freedmen in Virginia and North Carolina, their 1840s resettlement in Warren County, Ohio, their emigration to Haiti in 1861 as part of the Redpath movement, and their eventual return to Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1866. The correspondence dates principally from the 1870s, is chiefly written by A.W. Proctor, one of Alexander Proctor's sons, and S.S. Hutchins, friend of Proctor's son, Isaac, and relates to family affairs, business, and other matters. S.S. Hutchins is identified in the Gould's St. Louis Directory (1874), 449, as Chief Clerk in the U.S. Army Engineer's Office. One letter from a friend to a family member mentions seeing Frederick Douglass at Wilberforce College in 1893. The legal records document the free status of the Proctors, various labor agreements, and migration papers, and include receipts and letters of introduction.

One-folder collection of 19th century legal papers and correspondence concerning the migratory movements, legal status, life situations, and relationships of members of a free African American family. The correspondence dates principally from the 1870s, is chiefly written by A.W. Proctor, one of Alexander Proctor's sons, and S.S. Hutchins, friend of Proctor's son, Isaac, and relates to family affairs, business, and other matters. S.S. Hutchins is identified in the Gould's St. Louis Directory (1874), 449, as Chief Clerk in the U.S. Army Engineer's Office. One letter from a friend to a family member mentions seeing Frederick Douglass at Wilberforce College in 1893.

The legal records document the free status of the Proctors, various labor agreements, and migration papers, and include receipts and letters of introduction. Official documents from Haiti are written in French and include an 1865 order permitting the burial of Proctor at St. Marc, Haiti. In terms of the context relating to the family's emigration to Haiti, many people that emigrated by way of the Redpath Agency to Haiti, as was the case for the Proctors, either died or were untraceable by 1864, and few managed to return to the U.S.

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Black educator, journalist, and reformer from Raleigh, North Carolina. Correspondence, scrapbooks of clippings, print material such as articles and reports, and other papers, all dating from the Civil War into the first few decades of the 20th century. Includes a fourth edition of Lunsford Lane's slave narrative. The material discusses and illuminates the problems experienced by emancipated blacks during Reconstruction and into the early 20th century, encompassing agriculture, business, race relations, reconstruction, education, politics, voting rights, and economic improvement for African Americans. Other topics include Durham and Raleigh, N.C. history; the temperance movement, Hunter's personal matters and family finances, the North Carolina Industrial Association, and the N.C. Negro State Fair. Significant correspondents include Charles B. Aycock, Thomas W. Bickett, William E. Borah, Craig Locke, Josephus Daniels, W.E.B. Du Bois, Charles G. Dawes, John A. Logan, Lee S. Overman, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, Charles Sumner, Zebulon B. Vance, and Booker T. Washington. There is also correpondence from two early African American Congressmen, Henry P. Cheatham and George H. White. Also included is a draft of a speech given by Frederick Douglass in 1880 at the 2nd Negro State Fair.

The Charles N. Hunter Papers date from the 1850s to 1932 and consist of Hunter's personal and professional correspondence, scrapbooks of clippings, articles, reports, and memorabilia. Correspondence relates to personal and financial matters, as well as to Hunter's various activities to improve African American education and economic well-being, particularly in the South. Specific topics touched on throughout his papers include race relations, voting rights, creating an educational system for African Americans, the temperance movement, reconstruction, African American business and agriculture, the North Carolina Industrial Association, and the North Carolina Negro State Fair. The three correspondence subseries form almost half of the Personal and Professional Papers Series . The correspondence subseries are: Business/Community Incoming Correspondence, Personal Incoming Correspondence, and Outgoing Correspondence. Among the correspondents are several African American Congressional representatives such as George H. White and Henry P. Cheatham; major political figures like Franklin D. Roosevelt and John Alexander Logan; important African American scholars including W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington; and many North Carolina governors, in particular Zebulon B. Vance, Charles B. Aycock, Locke Craig, and Thomas Walter Bickett. Although these letters address professional and political issues, Hunter established friendships with many of the noteable correspondents. The incoming correspondence has been arranged into letters pertaining to Hunter's business or community activities and letters relating to Hunter's personal life. There are also numerous drafts and copies of outgoing correspondence that Hunter wrote.

In the Other Professional Papers Subseries, there is a variety of miscellaneous printed materials and papers that cover Hunter's career as a teacher and principal, involvement in the N.C. Industrial Association, and role in the N.C. Negro State Fair. Included in this subseries is an array of print materials that provide a view of African American life in the South. This includes commencement invitations from historically black colleges and universities, a fourth edition of Lunsford Lane's slave narrative, and newspaper clippings. The bulk of this subseries deals with the larger Raleigh area, though some items address national issues.

The Writings and Speeches Subseries includes addresses given by Hunter and others. Most noteable is a transcription of Frederick Douglass' speech given at the 2nd Annual N.C. Negro State Fair. Amongst Hunter's writings are several pieces intended for a local encyclopedia which detail historic locales and important North Carolina men. Writings cover topics such as African American voting rights and post-Reconstruction analysis. Overall, Hunter's writings provide historical sketches of important figures, events, and reprecussions with an emphasis on local history.

The Scrapbooks Series is made up of seventeen scrapbooks assembled by Hunter which contain clippings and other items concerning race relations and other social, political, and economic affairs pertaining to African Americans. They are composed principally of newspaper clippings published in North Carolina, but their scope is national as well as local. The clippings have been copied and arranged chronologically; the originals are closed to use.

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Cronly Family papers, 1806-1944 28 Linear Feet — 1,962 items

The Cronly family included Michael Cronly, Sr., auctioneer and real estate broker of Wilmington, N.C. and his wife, Margaret McLaurin Cronly and their nine children. Collection includes correspondence, legal papers, financial papers, writings, account books, volumes, clippings and printed material. It ranges in date from 1806-1944.

Correspondence, financial records, legal and other papers of the Cronly family. Subjects include auctions and auctioneering, Wilmington social life, Civil War experiences, the Wilmington, Charlotte and Rutherford Railway Company, railroad bonds issued in North Carolina during Reconstruction, an earthquake that struck the Carolinas in 1886, the Democratic Party and politics in North Carolina, and blacks during Reconstruction. Includes information on the Beatty, McLaurin and Murphy families of North Carolina, and descriptions of Charleston, Atlantic City (N.J.), Denver, Genoa (Italy), and the Hudson Fulton Celebration in New York City (1909). Correspondents include Thomas Walter Bickett, Jr., Harley Lyman Clarke, Stephen William Cole, Newton Martin Curtis, William Darius Jamieson, Herbert Putnam, Don Carlos Seitz, William Nathan Harrell Smith, Waddy Thompson, and Platt Dickinson Walker. The collection ranges in date from 1806-1944.

Collection also contains numerous bound volumes, ledgers, and account books that have not been inventoried or described.

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Patrick H. Cain papers, 1783-1940 6 Linear Feet — Approx. 2,904 Items

Merchant, tobacco merchant, landowner, distiller, and State Representative, from Mocksville and Settle (Davie Co.), N.C. Personal, legal, business, and financial papers of Patrick H. Cain and the Cain family, from Davie County, N.C. Included are letters describing life and social customs in Georgia; the education of women; student life at Normal College (later Trinity College, then Duke University) and at the University of North Carolina; Western migration; prices of products and services, the value of slaves, and the wages of freedmen; and the life of Confederate soldiers and military actions at First Manassas and Gettysburg. Legal papers consist of land grants, deeds, mortgages, arrests and summonses for debts, promissory notes, and material relating to the administration of various estates. Financial records include tax receipts and accounts. There is one volume of patient accounts, 1906-1925, belonging to Dr. John Cain. Correspondents include George Burgess Anderson, Francis Asbury, Samuel Ashe, Kemp P. Battle, John Joseph Bruner, D. R. Bruton, Lyman Copeland Draper, David Moffatt Furches, William H. Hayes, William Hill, Hamilton C. Jones, Leonidas Polk, Zebulon Vance, and Jonathan Worth.

Personal, legal, business, and financial papers of the Cain family. Included are letters describing life and social customs in Georgia, 1824-1827; school life at girls' academies, 1843-1856, at Normal College (later Trinity College), 1855-1856, at a seminary, 1869, and at the University of North Carolina, 1871-1880; Western migration and Western lands; business methods; prices of products and services, the value of slaves, and wages and tenancy of freedmen; the life of Confederate soldiers, including accounts of military activities, especially First Manassas and Gettysburg, and comments on conditions in the army and on officers, Jefferson Davis, and Abraham Lincoln.

Legal papers consist of land grants, deeds, mortgages, arrests and summonses for debts, promissory notes, and material relating to the administration of various estates. There are broadsides concerning Jonathan Worth and W. W. Holden. Financial records consist of tax receipts; accounts, 1889-1895, kept in advertising booklets; and a ledger containing patient accounts, 1906-1925, belonging to Dr. John M. Cain, Patrick Cain's brother. There are many manuscript volumes in the collection, chiefly financial.

Correspondents include George Burgess Anderson, Francis Asbury, Samuel Ashe, Kemp P. Battle, John Joseph Bruner, D. R. Bruton, Lyman Copeland Draper, David Moffatt Furches, Will H. Hayes, William Hill, Hamilton C. Jones, Leonidas Polk, Zebulon Vance, and Jonathan Worth.

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Thomas Carroll papers, 1844-1914 0.4 Linear Feet — approximately 155 items

The papers of Thomas Carroll span the years 1844 to 1914 with the majority of the papers dating from 1844 to 1887. They consist primarily of correspondence and accounts relating to his plantation, general store, and guardianship of orphans.

Carroll was a planter during the antebellum, Civil War, and postwar periods. After the mid-1870's he lived in Virginia and elsewhere in North Carolina, renting his farm to tenants. The correspondence documents his plantation business, especially trade with commission merchants between Norfolk, Virginia, and New York City and in Liverpool, England. There are also references to slaves, freedmen, tenant farmers, the cotton trade, and the agricultural economy and Reconstruction in North Carolina and other Southern states where family members lived. The Account Book, 1844-1867, contains lists of slaves and transactions involving slave hiring, overseers, workers, wages, midwives, a Petersburg merchant, educational expenses, and goods and services for numerous persons including architect Jacob W. Holt. The financial papers also document slaves, slave hiring, overseers, and educational expenses.

Carroll was the guardian of several orphans who included children of Congressman Joel Holleman. Financial papers and the Account Book, 1844-1867, contain guardianship accounts.

Two volumes from Carroll's general store document his mercantile business before the Civil War. The ledger accounts include free blacks, a shoe shop, Jacob W. Holt, and many slaves. The other volume contains inventories of goods and debts.